Soft Machines' VISCy business

Subject: General Tech | October 8, 2015 - 12:49 PM |
Tagged: VISC, Soft Machines, Shasta

A year ago The Tech Report talked with a representative from a company called Soft Machines who were designing processors using their new VISC architecture.  We are all familiar with CISC and RISC based designs, this new Virtual Instruction Set Computing is a new architecture designed after multicore processors became the norm.  The architecture is designed from the ground up to take advantage of multiple cores and is able to virtualize both cores and threads across multiple physical cores.  That means a demanding process that is still only a single thread could be run on a virtual core across multiple hardware cores, increasing the speed at which that task can be completed. 

Their current design, named Shasta is fabbed on a 16nm FinFET process, uses a generic 256-bit interconnect bus for compatibility with a wide variety of infrastructures and currently runs at 2GHz.  The Tech Report doesn't have any benchmarks per se, but you can read more about how this new architecture works here.


"Soft Machines presented details about its intriguing VISC CPU architecture, along with a roadmap for VISC CPUs and SoCs, at the 2015 Linley Processor Conference today. We spoke with Soft Machines founder and CTO Mohammad Abdallah and the company's VP of marketing and business development, Mark Casey, to learn more about these chips."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Far Cry Primal will be released ... eventually

Subject: General Tech | October 7, 2015 - 02:15 PM |
Tagged: gaming, far cry primal, ubisoft

Far Cry Primal was announced and it is even more console-centric than the previous release, seeing as how the PC launch will be a month after its initial release.  We can only hope that Ubisoft does spend time making sure that high end PCs do have graphic features that take advantage of the power provided by new GPUs.  As for the gameplay it should be interesting as there will be no more machine guns and fancy pistols, you will be stabbing mammoths with pointy sticks and running for your life from sabretooth tigers.  It also sounds as though eating enough food and other features common to the plethora of survival sims will be included, making this very different from previous games.  Check out the trailer and screenshots at Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN if you haven't seen them yet.


"Ubisoft attempted to announce Far Cry Primal [official site] with a tantalising livestream, which was rather spoiled by a brief leak of the game’s name and basic details. Now we know more, including proper trailers, screenshots, and a release date… which will see the game land on PC the month after it’ll arrive on console."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:


On-die watercooling

Subject: General Tech | October 7, 2015 - 01:06 PM |
Tagged: watercooling, nifty

These researchers are skipping the waterblock altogether and have made channels in surface of the die its self for de-ionized water to flow through and cool the chip.  The 28-nanometer Altera FPGA they tested this cooling method on had numerous channels cut into it which were then sealed up with a layer of silicon.  With a flow rate of 147 ml/minute they kept the chip to a comfortable 24C, a mere 4C higher than the temperature of the water and significantly lower than the 60C the chip would run at using air cooling.  Neither Hack a Day nor PCPer encourage you to try to cut micron sized channels in your brand new processor, however we all hope to see this cooling technique incorporated into heatspreaders in future generations of processors.


"Researchers at Georgia Tech have been working on cutting fluid channels directly into the back of commercial silicon die (an Altera FPGA, to be exact). The tiny channels measure about 100 micron and are resealed with another layer of silicon. Water is pumped into the channels to cool the device efficiently."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hack a Day

MSI Releases GK-701 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard

Subject: General Tech | October 7, 2015 - 09:45 AM |
Tagged: msi, GK-701, gaming keyboard, cherry mx brown

MSI has a new mechanical gaming keyboard available, and the GK-701 features MSI’s black and red "Dragon" styling with red LED backlighting for each key, and uses Cherry MX Brown switches.


MSI is emphasizing the quality of their build with this new keyboard, stating that each key “is created with precision laser etching for extra resistance to wear and tear”, and the red LED backlight for each key is rated for “over 50 million key presses”. Additionally, the GK-701 offers a braided USB cable with a 18K gold plated connector, and there is a set of multimedia hotkeys and a game mode that disables the Windows Key. As this is a mechanical keyboard one of the biggest aspects is of course key switch selection, and the Cherry MX Brown switches MSI has chosen for the GK-701 offer a tactile “non-clicky” feel that some prefer.

GK-701 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard specs from MSI:

  • Cherry MX Brown switches
  • Red LED Backlight
  • Windows Key Lock
  • N-Key Rollover
  • Multimedia Hotkeys
  • Anti-slip Rubber Feet
  • Ergonomic Design
  • USB 2.0 connection
  • Braided wire and gold-plated connector
  • Switches lifetime: 50 Million Clicks
  • Dimensions: 450 x 165 x 38mm, 1200g weight


The MSI GK-701 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard is available now and currently selling on for $119.99.

Source: MSI

Quick! Win 1 of 20 Star Wars Battlefront Beta keys from Logitech G and LucasArts!

Subject: General Tech | October 6, 2015 - 10:53 PM |
Tagged: logitech g, logitech, gleam, giveaway, contest

Look, time is short, and we want to get you these keys SOON!

Sign up using the form below to enter to win 1 of 20 keys for the PC version of Star Wars Battlefront beta on-going RIGHT NOW. I played for a couple of hours today and I have to say the game is looking very impressive - both visually and in terms of fun gameplay.


Our thanks to Logitech G and LucasArts for the key for our readers!!

SW Battlefront Keys

StarCraft II 3.0 Patch Is Released

Subject: General Tech | October 6, 2015 - 08:20 PM |
Tagged: Starcraft II, starcraft, blizzard, pc gaming, legacy of the void

And oh boy is it a big one. Turning on the launcher automatically downloads about 14GB worth of StarCraft II code and content. The patch includes the new user interface that we reported on earlier, but it also opens the Whispers of Oblivion prequel campaign for Legacy of the Void to the masses, changes the file format of game content to CASC, which might explain the huge download, and gives the option of a 64-bit game executable, and more.


About the CASC format, it was introduced in Heroes of the Storm and Warlords of Draenor as a method of storing content. It should be faster, more error resistant, easier to patch, and easier to extend the functionality of. I'm not sure how this will affect modders, authorized or otherwise, but I'm guessing that Blizzard is happy to deprecate a 20 year-old format. I'm not sure if they're migrating the content from MPQ to CASC on the client machine, or just re-downloading the content in the new format, but a 14GB patch is doing something. Lastly, this new format and the 64-bit launcher might even allow for bigger games and mods. If anyone has any experience with modding Blizzard games, be sure to leave a note in the comments, even anonymously.

Legacy of the Void will arrive on November 10th.

Source: Blizzard

Google your local nuclear plants infrastructure? That's not terrifying at all.

Subject: General Tech | October 6, 2015 - 01:11 PM |
Tagged: nuclear, security

Stuxnet hit the news five years ago when it was discovered infecting the industrial Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition systems of factories all across the world, up to and including nuclear plants.  The breadth of the attack was a bit more than what Israeli intelligence and the NSA originally intended but they did succeed in severely damaging their actual target which was an Iranian uranium enrichment plant.  Unfortunately it seems the development of Stuxnet might have been somewhat of a waste of resources as they could probably have achieved the same results with a simple man in the middle attack. 

The  Chatham House recently released a report on the state of security in nuclear power plants and facilities across the globe and the results are horrifying to say the least.  From the overview that The Register provides the level of security present in many of these facilities is commensurate with your average high school.  The idea that these plants are air-gapped is a fallacy and the code for the control systems can be easily altered remotely without the need to design a complex virus to infect them.  Thankfully it is very difficult to cause a nuclear plant to go critical but these vulnerabilities can still cause damage to machinery and interfere with the plants ability to provide power to customers.  You may not want to read the whole story if you want to sleep well tonight.


"The report adds that search engines can "readily identify critical infrastructure components with" VPNs, some of which are power plants. It also adds that facility operators are "sometimes unaware of" them."

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Source: The Register

Star Wars Battlefront Shouldn't Have Microtransactions?

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2015 - 06:24 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, ea, battlefront

So I'm reading PC Gamer and I see an article that says, “Star Wars Battlefront Will Not Use Microtransactions”. Given the previous few Battlefield games, this surprised me. Granted, these titles weren't particularly egregious in their use of payments. Everything (apart from expansion packs of course) could be achieved through a reasonable amount of play. That said, it takes a lot of restraint for a developer to not just ratchet the requirements further and further to widen their net, so I can see the problem.


Regardless, by the third paragraph I notice that the representative never actually said that they won't (according to the snippets that PC Gamer quoted). The phrase is simply, “not part of the core design of how it works”. Granted, I would expect that EA would poke PC Gamer to correct them if they did intend to release a game in about six weeks, so I feel like their interpretation is correct.

That doesn't change that, according to the quotes, the only thing they promised is for the currency system to be fully accessible without payments. I'm not fully convinced that it will only be accessible without payments, though.

Source: PC Gamer

Linux turns 24 in time for the party in Dublin

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2015 - 01:14 PM |
Tagged: LinuxCon Europe, linux, open source

LinuxCon Europe has just kicked off and there are some interesting projects being discussed at the event.  ARM, Cisco, NexB, Qualcomm, SanDisk and Wind River have formed the Openchain workgroup to bring some standardization to Linux software development, such as exists in Debian, to ensure that multiple companies are not attempting design their own wheels simultaneously.  The Real-Time Linux Collaborative Project is developing software for application in robotics, telecom, and aviation and includes members such as Google, Texas Instruments, Intel, ARM and Altera.  They will be working towards developing Linux applications for those industries where shaving a few milliseconds off of transaction times can be worth millions of dollars.  The last major project announced at the convention will be FOSSology 3.0 which will enable you quickly and easily run licence and copyright scans, something near and dear to the heart of the Free and Open Source Software community.  Check out more at The Inquirer.


"Tim Zemlin, chief executive of the Foundation, said in his opening remarks that this year's opening day falls on the 24th anniversary of Linux itself and the 30th of the Free Software Foundation, giving credit to delegates for their part in the success of both."

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Tech Talk


Source: The Inquirer

Humble Bundle Launches Humble Monthly Bundle

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2015 - 08:31 AM |
Tagged: pc gaming, humble bundle

Humble Bundle is an organization that sells games for charity. It started with a service that let users pay pretty much whatever they want for DRM-free titles, and let them choose how much went to the developers, the organization, and the selected charities of the moment. They have branches out since then, sometimes with praise, sometimes with concerned murmors.

Humble Bundle mumble, if you will.


Now they have created a subscription service. Basically, on the first Friday of every month, subscribers will receive the game that is promoted. In other words, it is a service that acts similar to what we're used to, except that you don't know what you're getting ahead of time, you cannot select how much you pay for it, and you cannot choose the proceed distribution. Unless it leads to a unique palette of games that are decidedly better than the typical bundles, I cannot see how this is anything more than a restrictive subset for the sake of it.

Still, that doesn't mean said subset isn't worth your money (be careful of the double-negative). If it is, then you can subscribe now and pick up Legend of Grimrock 2. The title is apparently available on Steam for $24, so this would be a half-price deal if it was something that you were interesting in buying.

I guess that's a decent first impression.

Windows 10 IoT Core Starter Pack for the Pi 2 Released

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | October 5, 2015 - 08:01 AM |
Tagged: windows 10, microsoft, iot

Microsoft has released the Windows 10 IoT Core for the Raspberry Pi 2. It retails for 75$ without the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B, or $115$ with it. Apart from the optional Pi, it is basically a pack of electronic components and an SD card that's pre-loaded with Windows 10 IoT. It is available at the Adafruit store, although both packs are currently out of stock... because of course they are.


Beyond jumper wires, a case, breadboards, resistors, LEDs, switches, and sensors, the pack also comes with a WiFi module. Interestingly, Adafruit claims that this will be the only WiFi adapter for the Raspberry Pi 2 that's supported by Windows 10 IoT. This is weird, of course, because Windows is kind-of the go-to when it comes to driver support. It makes me wonder whether Microsoft changed anything under the hood that affects hardware compatibility and, if it did, whether Windows 10 IoT loses its major advantage over Linux and other OSes in this form factor.

The kit is currently sold up, but retails for $75, or $115 with a Raspberry Pi 2 Model B.

Source: Microsoft

GOM eXP Shuts Down and Sells GSL to afreecaTV

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2015 - 07:32 AM |
Tagged: starcraft 2, starcraft, pc gaming, esports

I'm not really seeing anyone pick up this news in English outside of StarCraft II forums, so I'm not sure whether this news will be fresh, or completely irrelevant to anyone's interests. Either way, GOM eXP was one of the leading broadcasters of StarCraft tournaments in South Korea. They operated GSL, which was one of the three Blizzard-endorsed leagues for StarCraft II.


Image Credit: Wolf Shröder via Twitter

They have just shut down, but their GSL tournament will not.

afreecaTV, a video streaming service, has bought out the tournament. For viewers, this means that high quality, 1080p streams will be available for free. Previously, GOM was a bit strict about forcing Twitch subscriptions for anything other than Low quality. The quality was bad enough that you often couldn't even read the on-screen text, such as how many units or resources each player has.

Beyond hosting the 2016 GSL tournament, they will also have a couple of StarCraft II show matches and even a StarCraft: Brood War league. I wonder how the original StarCraft holds up for viewers after we have gotten used to the sequel's updated graphics. Hmm.

Source: TeamLiquid

Microsoft Buys Havok from Intel

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2015 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: physics, microsoft, Intel, Havok

Microsoft has just purchased Havok from Intel for an undisclosed price. This group develops one of the leading physics engines for video games and other software. It was used in every Halo title since Halo 2, including Halo Wars, and a fork of it drives the physics for Valve's Source Engine. It has been around since 2000, but didn't really take off until Max Payne 2 in 2003.

And the natural follow-up question for just about everything is “why?”


Hopefully this isn't bad taste...
Photo Credit: Havok via Game Developer Magazine (June 2013)

There are good reasons, though. First, Microsoft has been in the video game middleware and API business for decades. DirectX is the obvious example, but they have also created software like Games for Windows Live and Microsoft Gaming Zone. Better software drives sales for platforms, and developers can always use help accomplishing that.

Another reason could be Azure. Microsoft wants to bring cloud services to online titles, offloading some of the tasks that are insensitive to latency allows developers to lower system requirements or do more with what they have (which is especially true when consoles flatten huge install bases to a handful of specifications). If they plan to go forward with services that run on Azure or Xbox Live, then it would make sense to have middleware that's as drop-in as possible. Creating a physics engine from scratch is a bit of a hassle, but so is encouraging existing engines to use it.

It would be better to just buy someone that everyone is using. Currently, that's Havok, an open-source solution that is rarely used outside of other open-source systems, and something that's owned by NVIDIA (and probably won't leave their grip until their fingers are frigid and lifeless).

That's about all we know, though. The deal doesn't have a close date, value, or official purpose. Intel hasn't commented on the deal, only Microsoft has.

Source: Microsoft

StarCraft II v3.0 Gets Another New UI

Subject: General Tech | October 3, 2015 - 11:04 PM |
Tagged: Starcraft II, legacy of the void, blizzard

Third time's the charm, unless they plan another release at some point.

The StarCraft II interface isn't perfect. Even though it is interesting and visually appealing, some tasks are unnecessarily difficult and space is not used in the most efficient way. To see what I mean, try to revert the multiplayer mode to Wings of Liberty, or, worse, find your Character Code. Blizzard released a new UI with Heart of the Swarm back in 2013, and they're doing a new one for the release of Legacy of the Void on November 10th. Note that my two examples probably won't be fixed in this update, they are just examples of UX issues.

While the update aligns with the new expansion, Blizzard will patch the UI for all content levels, including the free Starter Edition. This honestly makes sense, because it's easier to patch a title when all variations share a common core. Then again, not every company patches five-year-old titles like Blizzard does, so the back-catalog support is appreciated.


The most heartwarming change for fans, if pointless otherwise, is in the campaign selection screen. As the StarCraft II trilogy will be completed with Legacy of the Void, the interface aligns them as three episodes in the same style as the original StarCraft did.

On the functional side, the interface has been made more compact (which I alluded to earlier). This was caused by the new chat design, which is bigger yet less disruptive than it was in Heart of the Swarm. The column of buttons on the side are now a top bar, which expands down for sub-menu items.


While there are several things that I don't mention, a final note for this post is that Arcade will now focus on open lobbies. Players can look for the specific game they want, but the initial screen will show lobbies that are waiting to fill. The hope seems to be that players waiting for a game will spend less time. This raises two questions. First, Arcade games tend to have a steep learning curve, so I wonder if this feature will slump off after people try a few rounds before realizing that they should stick with a handful of games. Second, I wonder what this means for player numbers in general -- this sounds like a feature that is added during player declines, which Blizzard seems to hint is not occuring.

I'm not sure when the update will land, but it will probably be around the launch of Legacy of the Void on November 10th.

Source: Blizzard

Android to iPhone Day 6: Battery Life and Home Screens

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | October 1, 2015 - 02:45 PM |
Tagged: iphone 6s, iphone, ios, google, apple, Android

PC Perspective’s Android to iPhone series explores the opinions, views and experiences of the site’s Editor in Chief, Ryan Shrout, as he moves from the Android smartphone ecosystem to the world of the iPhone and iOS. Having been entrenched in the Android smartphone market for 7+ years, the editorial series is less of a review of the new iPhone 6s as it is an exploration on how the current smartphone market compares to what each sides’ expectations are.

Full Story Listing:


Day 4

It probably won’t come as a shock to the millions of iPhone users around the globe, but the more days I keep the 6s in my pocket, the more accepting I am becoming with the platform. The phone has been fast and reliable – I have yet to come across any instability or application crashes despite my incessant installations of new ones. And while I think it’s fair to say that even new Android-based phones feel snappy to user interactions out of the box, the iPhone is just about a week in without me ever thinking about performance – which is exactly what you want from a device like this.

There are some quirks and features missing from the iPhone 6s that I had on my Droid Turbo that I wish I could implement in settings or through third-party applications. I fell in love with the ability to do a double wrist rotation with the Droid as a shortcut to opening up the camera. It helped me capture quite a few photos when I only had access to a single hand and without having to unlock the phone, find an icon, etc. The best the iPhone has is a “drag up from the bottom” motion from the lock screen but I find myself taking several thumb swipes on it before successfully activating it when only using one hand. Trying to use the home button to access the lock screen, and thus the camera shortcut, is actually hindered because the Touch ID feature is TOO FAST, taking me to a home screen (that may not have the camera app icon on it) where I need to navigate around.

I have been a user of the Pebble Time since it was released earlier this year and I really enjoy the extended battery life (measured in days not hours) when compared to Android Wear devices or the Apple Watch. However, the capabilities of the Pebble Time are more limited with the iPhone 6s than they are with Android – I can no longer use voice dictation to reply to text messages or emails and the ability to reply with easy templates (yes, no, I’ll be there soon, etc.) is no longer available. Apple does not allow the same level of access to the necessary APIs as Android does and thus my Time has effectively become a read-only device.


Finally, my concern about missing widgets continues to stir within me; it is something that I think the iPhone 6s could benefit from greatly. I also don’t understand the inability to arrange the icons on the home screens in an arbitrary fashion. Apple will not let me move icons to the bottom of the page without first filling up every other spot on the screen – there can be no empty spaces!! So while my organizational style would like to have a group of three icons in the bottom right hand corner of the screen with some empty space around it, Apple doesn’t allow me to do that. If I want those icons in that location I need to fill up every empty space on the screen to do so. Very odd.

Continue reading my latest update on my Android to iPhone journey!!

Podcast #369 - Fable Legends DX12 Benchmark, Apple A9 SoC, Intel P3608 SSD, and more!

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 02:17 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, fable legends, dx12, apple, A9, TSMC, Samsung, 14nm, 16nm, Intel, P3608, NVMe, logitech, g410, TKL, nvidia, geforce now, qualcomm, snapdragon 820

PC Perspective Podcast #369 - 10/01/2015

Join us this week as we discuss the Fable Legends DX12 Benchmark, Apple A9 SoC, Intel P3608 SSD, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom, and Allyn Malventano

Program length: 1:42:35

  1. Week in Review:
  2. 0:54:10 This episode of PC Perspective is brought to you by…Zumper, the quick and easy way to find your next apartment or home rental. To get started and to find your new home go to
  3. News item of interest:
  4. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
  5. Closing/outro

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

The headphones of choice on Aiur; Corsair's VOID

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: corsair, VOID Wireless, gaming headset, 7.1 headset

On paper these headphones are impressive, wireless performance out to 40' with 16 hours of charge, frequency response of 20Hz to 20kHz on the 50mm drivers and 7.1 surround sound.  There have been many previous software emulated 7.1 directional gaming headsets which have disappointed users but in this case Benchmark Reviews quite liked the performance of the VOID while gaming and listening to music.  The noise cancelling microphone, dubbed an “InfoMic” as it has LED lights which can be illuminated in different ways depending on your preferences and even the game you happen to be playing.  You can also sync the lights with other Corsair RGB devices using the Cue software if you are so inclined.  Check out the full reivew right here.


"In the world of computer peripherals and hardware, most of us are well aware of Corsair’s existence. This is an organization that has well-earned reputation for producing quality components; components that are going to be high-performing, intelligently designed, and very likely to provide its owners with years of service."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner


You thought Stagefright was just taking a bow? Surprise! It's an encore.

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2015 - 12:44 PM |
Tagged: stagefright, security, Android

Assuming you have a carrier with a sense of responsibility and a reasonably modern phone the chances are you are patched against the original Stagefright vulnerability.  This is not the case for the recently reported vulnerabilities dubbed Stagefright 2.0.  If you open a specially and nefariously modified MP3 or MP4 file in Stagefright on Android 5.0+ it has been confirmed that those files can trigger remote code execution via libstagefright.  If you are on an older model then the vulnerability lies in libutils and can be used for the same purpose, gaining access to the data stored on your device.  From the security company reports that The Register has linked, it sounds like we can expect many repeat performances as the Stagefright library was poorly written and contains many mistakes; worse is the fact that it is not sandboxed in any way and has significantly higher access than an application for playing media files should ever have.


"Joshua Drake from the security outfit Zimperium zLabs introduced us to StageFright earlier this summer, and he is now back with a similar warning and a brace of problems, according to a post on the Kaspersky Threatpost news site."

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Tech Talk


Source: The Register

This mouse goes to 12000! The ROCCAT Nyth

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 04:05 PM |
Tagged: roccat, Nyth, gaming mouse, input

That is no typo, the Twin-Tech Laser Sensor R1 on the Nyth really does go all the way up to 12000 DPI and it also has an adjustable lift-off distance.  There are also 18 buttons, with the shift key function they can all be assigned a second function as well.  The Swarm software used to program the mouse is rather impressive, not only can you assign profiles to games you can program a light show into your mouse if you so desire.  It will set you back $120 but if the price tag does not scare you off you can see how it performs in MadShrimps' review.


"ROCCAT Nyth is like a breath of fresh air in the already crowded gaming mice market which sports quite a modular design with replaceable right side panel, no less than four different sets of buttons, a smooth durable plastic texture, catchy LED light effects and a comfortable shape for lengthy gaming sessions."

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Tech Talk

Source: Mad Shrimps

It won't take skill to play Fallout 4

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2015 - 02:31 PM |
Tagged: gaming, fallout 4

Fallout 4 is sounding less and less like a Fallout game and more like a game which happens to bear the name Fallout.  Apparently the skill system which has been a core of Fallout is confusing people, although how is unclear and the example given is rather poor “What’s better, the Charisma SPECIAL, or the Speech Skill" considering you can't have more than a 10 Charisma.  Perhaps it is too early to be negative, there will be 70 perks, 10 level for each SPECIAL stat and each perk with five levels to increase their effectiveness.  Your perks are limited by the stat, if you have a Perception of 7 then you will never be able to gain the perks associated with levels 8 and higher, then again if you have a stat of 10 at level 1 nothing is stopping you from starting with a level 10 perk.

There are going to be a lot of differences apparent in Fallout 4 and it will be interesting to see how they effect gameplay.  Excitiment is waning for some long time fans but perhaps for gamers new to the series who are in love with crafting, base management and are easily confused by numbers this will be a perfect introduction to the wasteland.  Follow the link to RPS to see the video explaining the new system.


"Here’s the big news: as many suspected, Skills are indeed gone, with their effects rolled into a bounteous system of perks with levels of their own. I’ll explain."

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