Cooler Master Announces Silent Pro M2 Power Supplies

Subject: General Tech | June 29, 2012 - 06:30 AM |
Tagged: silent pro m2, PSU, power supply, cooler master

Cooler Master, a company known for its computer cases and heat sinks has announced an update to its Silent Pro M-series power supplies with the Silent Pro M2 line. Coming in 620 watt, 720 watt, and 1500 watt models, the company has reportedly implemented improvements in every aspects of the PSUs. The 620W and 720W power supplies utilize a single 12V rail capable of delivering 50A and 58A respectively. The 1500W PSU further implements dual 12V rails pushing 70A on one rail and an additional 55A on the other.

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All three power supplies are modular, minus the ATX power cable which is permanent. The 620W and 720W models are 80 PLUS Bronze certified while the 1500W model is rated at 80 PLUS Silver. The Silent Pro M2 line is RoHS and ERP 2010 compliant, as well. Further, they have an improved 3.3V DC-to-DC converter and larger capacitors that enable hold-up times greater than 17ms. A 135mm fan with hydraulic bearing aims to keep the power supplies cool.

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While Cooler Master has not announced pricing, they are set to be available for purchase sometime in June 2012. You can find more information on the Silent Pro M2 PSUs on the company's product pages.

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June 29, 2012 | 08:01 AM - Posted by Branthog

I can't bring myself to buy a Cooler Master power supply after the garbage they've pulled in the past. They put out this "engineering" video intended to explain to people who other PSU manufacturers are shady, because they use tricks to fool people into thinking a power supply is more powerful than it is (so you'll sometimes see something sold as a 600W PSU when the math on the back of the label actually only adds up to 500 watts).

Only problem is, Cooler Master is/was guilty of the same thing. Even including the model of their own PSU that they used in the demo (which they've long since pulled down), which was supposed to be something like a 500W PSU that only really ran 450W. Then there are the tested Cooler Master PSUs that barely hit 500 watts, but were sold as 650 watts.

They do make some decent products. The Cosmos II I'm rocking right now isn't bad. Neither is the Cooler Master 212+ and 212+ EVO (as far as smaller and affordable HSFs go -- especially if you don't have the room or cash for a Noctua D14). But their PSUs? Nope. Seasonic, Enermax, Kingwin, and Corsair are at the top of that line (yes, I know Seasonic are behind most of the Corsair lines). No reason to go Cooler Master with their tainted spots when you can go with so many other known-great options.

http://www.hardocp.com/news/2011/07/12/psu_label_debate

June 29, 2012 | 08:17 AM - Posted by Tim Verry

I don't disagree with you, but they do seem to work in a pinch for budget builds that don't need much power. I have a Cooler Master in the PC that I built for my mom and it's been solid for the past two years or so. I do agree that Corsair is one of the best, especially considering where they are usually priced at, very competitively. The only other PSU that I've personally used was the Antec True Power Trio 650W that I've been using since 2007 in my main rig. That thing just keeps on ticking through multiple rig overhauls 0.0.  May have to switch it out for a Corsair unit eventually though, it's probably getting a bit too old and needs to be retired.

EDIT: Oh, and yeah that does certainly sound like shady marketing...

June 29, 2012 | 09:31 AM - Posted by Branthog

I totally had forgotten to include Antec in there (which make really great 1k+ PSU).

My current PSU is a Seasonic 1000W Platinum and I used to be an enormous fan of Power PC & Cooling, until OCZ bought them. Based on reviews, OCZ seems to make a lot of quality PSUs, but I'm not sure how they measure up to the original PCP&C brand, so last time around (before the Seasonic), I went with Corsair and had a pretty good experience. Granted, it involved a TX950 blowing up in a giant puff of black smoke, but the RMA process was painless. The other great thing about the (direct) Seasonics is the give and seven year warranties. It's great to know you have something that is going to be transplantable into several generations of machines, without question.

As you mention, however, it's damned hard to find a solid lower power PSU that still meets a lot of the efficiency and quality standards of bigger PSUs. Even from very reputable companies with great support. For the most part, it seems like everything below a certain power/price point is making a big quality sacrifice almost across the board.

When it comes to CM, I just feel they have a big chore ahead of them to re-establish themselves for a lot of people who saw the back and forth over their unintentional self-incriminating "expose". Frankly, I would normally refuse to buy anything from CM for awhile, because of it. But damn it, the CM 212 EVO is just such a nice HSF for the price and the Cosmos II is just so damned versatile for water and air, despite its price. :)

July 4, 2012 | 11:46 AM - Posted by Tim Verry

Yeah that's true, they do have sort of a bad rep/bad press surround them that they have to overcome. I haven't seen anyone recommend a Cooler Master PSU in a really long time, actually. Hopefully they can start to work towards even better products and get some good reviews out there to build up their brand again.

June 30, 2012 | 10:06 AM - Posted by Chaitanya Shukla (not verified)

I have a coolermaster PSUs in my PC for last 7 years and never had any issues with one. I am considering a shift to Seasonic/Antec as they seem to have some of the best quality and efficient psu on market.

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