AMD's new A-series processors; why didn't they tell anyone?

Subject: General Tech | December 21, 2011 - 12:39 PM |
Tagged: llano, APU, amd, a-series

From DigiTimes we have some news that AMD has been keeping a very tight lid on for some reason.   The secret was not a brand new product line or surprising advance that won't see the light of day for a long time to come, instead it was the arrival of updated A-series APUs to the market.  With absolutely no press build up or even a review of these processors in sight it came as a bit of a surprise, albeit a good one.  We have a pair of new A-8 and A-6 processors and a single A-4 on the desktop side, with an addional "K" in the name of two.  That "K", which you will remember from Intel processors, does indeed seem to replace the Black Edition name AMD previously used to identify unlocked processors.  For the notebooks are a few more chips, two of each of the A-8 and A-6, three A-4 processors and an E2 as well.  The naming scheme here is concerned with the TDP of the chip, an M part is 35W and the MX is 45W.  

Perhaps AMD let a few too many of their marketers go as they are not only not telling anyone about their new parts they had to borrow a naming scheme from the competition.  Catch all of DigiTimes coverage here.

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"AMD has updated its A-series lineup of desktop and notebook accelerated processing units (APUs), further improving its family of dual- and quad-core APUs. Along with speed and performance improvements, AMD Steady Video update make this unique feature more compelling. For desktop users, AMD extends its overclocking pedigree to the APU; for the first time users can tune both x86 and graphics settings in a single processor for boosted performance.

The updated AMD A-series APUs combine up to four x86 CPU cores with up to 400 Radeon cores, delivering powerful DirectX 11-capable, discrete-level graphics and dedicated HD video processing on a single chip. These new APUs increase performance and deliver a richer feature set than existing AMD A-series APUs. Plus, only AMD APUs offer AMD Dual Graphics for an up to 144% visual performance boost when a select APU is paired with a select AMD Radeon HD 6500 Series graphics card.

The AMD A-series family of APUs also features AMD Steady Video, designed to stabilize videos during playback. On select systems using AMD A-series APUs, Internet Explorer 9 will include an AMD Steady Video plugin, unlocking one-click control to simplify access to the premium AMD Steady Video feature for video stabilization.

All AMD A-series processors are powered by AMD VISION Engine Software, a suite of software that provides end-users with regular updates designed to improve system performance and stability, and can add new software enhancements."

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Source: DigiTimes
December 21, 2011 | 03:27 PM - Posted by Tim Verry

hehe, yeah I had not heard even a whisper about these things, you would think AMD would be marketing these things as they have been much more successful than Bulldozer 0.0

December 22, 2011 | 07:48 AM - Posted by Firekingdom (not verified)

What are the prices for each?

What are the specs for the notebook side, like graphics and cross fire video card.

If PCPER did a price to performance what is graphic based.
Discrete + apu in crossfire vs discrete graphics with prices points in mind. Budget under $600.

December 23, 2011 | 04:18 AM - Posted by Angry

I cant believe they add the "k" like Intel....
I like both AMD and Intel, but......seriously?

December 23, 2011 | 03:57 PM - Posted by annoyingmouse (not verified)

Since they harbor a pretense of gaming, I wonder why they pair the faster clocked dual core processors with the weakest graphics chips.

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