Know CPUs were made of sand? Yes, but I like your video.

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Processors | May 30, 2012 - 06:42 PM |
Tagged: Intel, fab

Intel has released an animated video and supplementary PDF document to explain how Intel CPUs are manufactured. The video is more “cute” than anything else although the document is surprisingly really well explained for the average interested person. If you have ever wanted to know how a processor was physically produced then I highly recommend taking about a half of an hour to watch the video and read the text.

If you have ever wondered how CPUs came to be from raw sand -- prepare to get learned.

Intel has published a video and accompanied information document which explains their process almost step by step. The video itself will not teach you too much as it was designed to illustrate the information in the online pamphlet.

Not shown is the poor sandy bridges that got smelted for your enjoyment.

Rest in got

My background in education is a large part of the reason why I am excited by this video. The accompanied document is really well explained, goes into just the right amount of detail, and does so very honestly. The authors did not shy away from declaring that they do not produce their own wafers nor did they sugarcoat that each die even on the same wafer could perform differently or possibly not at all.

You should do yourself a favor and check it out.

Source: Intel (pdf)
May 30, 2012 | 08:28 PM - Posted by Nilbog

Did that video really have to be so Disney?
However the pdf was a good read, thank you. : )

May 31, 2012 | 05:47 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

Now show the bean counters at Intel ordering the cheep thermal compound! Perhaps a cartoon droopy at an old hand cranked adding machine would be apropo!

June 2, 2012 | 01:46 AM - Posted by cyow

that was just cool

would have been good to see areal one been made but hay still cool

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