CES 2013: The Verge Interviews Gave Newell for Steam Box. Valve's Director Hints Post-Kepler GPUs Can Be Virtualized!

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Graphics Cards, Networking, Systems, Shows and Expos | January 8, 2013 - 11:11 PM |
Tagged: valve, gaben, Gabe Newell, ces 2013, CES

So the internet has been in a roar about The Steam Box and it probably will eclipse Project Shield as topic of CES 2013. The Verge scored an interview to converse about the hardware future of the company and got more than he asked for.

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Now if only he would have discussed potential launch titles.

Wow! That *is* a beautiful knife collection.

The point which stuck with me most throughout the entire interview was directed at Valve’s opinion of gaming on connected screens. Gabe Newell responded,

The Steam Box will also be a server. Any PC can serve multiple monitors, so over time, the next-generation (post-Kepler) you can have one GPU that’s serving up eight simulateneous [sic] game calls. So you could have one PC and eight televisions and eight controllers and everybody getting great performance out of it. We’re used to having one monitor, or two monitors -- now we’re saying lets expand that a little bit.

This is pretty much confirmation, assuming no transcription errors on the part of The Verge, that Maxwell will support the virtualization features of GK110 and bring it mainstream. This also makes NVIDIA Grid make much more sense in the long term. Perhaps NVIDIA will provide some flavor of a Grid server for households directly?

The concept gets me particularly excited. One of the biggest wastes of money the tech industry has is purchasing redundant hardware. Consoles are a perfect example: not only is the system redundant to your other computational device which is usually at worst a $200 GPU away from a completely better experience, you pay for software to be reliant on that redundant platform which will eventually disappear along with said software. In fact, many have multiple redundant consoles because the list of software they desire is not localized to just one system so they need redundant redundancies. Oy!

A gaming server should help make the redundancy argument more obvious. If you need extra interfaces then you should only need to purchase the extra interfaces. Share the number crunching and only keep it up to date.

Also check out the rest of the interview over at The Verge. I decided just to cover a small point with potentially big ramifications.

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Source: The Verge
January 9, 2013 | 12:25 AM - Posted by Jingles (not verified)

F**K you Gabe, don't care about your shitty Steam box, just want HL 3 or HL EP3 whatever you want to call it FFS hurry up with it already!

January 9, 2013 | 03:38 PM - Posted by TheDruidsKeeper (not verified)

This is epic news! I glad to see Steam making this push. Cloud & virtualization is the future of all computation, including gaming. I can't wait to get a gaming server to throw on my rack!

January 10, 2013 | 05:43 PM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

GK104 and GK107 already has all the virtualization features.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14c6bPeCx4w

http://www.nvidia.com/object/grid-boards.html

"GRID boards feature NVIDIA Kepler-based GPUs that, for the first time, allow hardware virtualization of the GPU. This means multiple users can share a single GPU, improving user density while providing true PC performance and compatibility."

"GRID K1 4 x entry Kepler GPUs

GRID K2 2 x high-end Kepler GPUs"

November 7, 2013 | 05:26 AM - Posted by miriya (not verified)

I am looking forward for the Steam box to become commercially viable for the common man. I will certainly like to have one. Each of us can play a different game of our choice at the same time! That is so cool! visit

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