More than just a monitor, Samsung's C27A750 27” LCD is a wireless station

Subject: Displays | July 26, 2011 - 02:58 PM |
Tagged: wireless, tn lcd, samsung C27A750, Samsung, 27

The Samsung C27A750 27” Central Station Wireless Monitor is a 27" 1080p TN LCD monitor which is intended to solve your wiring problems.  It sports HDMI and D-sub for video, along with a wireless USB 2.0 dongle but there are also a pair of USB 3.0 ports, a pair of USB 2.0 ports, a 3.5mm jack for speakers and a network port.  Essentially it mimics a multifunctional dock while also being a 27" monitor which can be connected wirelessly to a PC.  As positive as this multi-functional base sounds, Hardware Canucks were disappointed with its physical stability as the base is the same size as the 24" model.  Their testing revealed good points and bad points about the display and dock, perhaps the biggest being that you should not even consider gaming over the wireless connection.  As well, a 27" display at 1080p is not optimal but for use as a secondary display with a laptop, netbook or even smart phone the dock and wireless capabilities are impressive.

HWC_samsung_lcddock.jpg

"During this year's CES, Samsung debuted their Central Station technology which promised to combine an all in one connectivity and networking hub into a high performance monitor. This centralized approach will surely appeal to notebook, tablet and netbook users since it can expand screen real estate while eliminating the need to attach unwanted wires to an otherwise quick setup. One of the first products to feature Central Station technology is the C27A750 27” monitor."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

LG Unveils World's First Glasses-Free 3D LCD Display

Subject: Displays | July 16, 2011 - 10:54 AM |
Tagged: monitor, LG, lenticular display, 3d display, 3d

LG Electronics, maker of HD televisions, computer displays, and a myriad of consumer electronics devices unveiled a new glasses-free 3D monitor that claims to be the first display of its kind. Using a lenticular display and a built in webcam to automatically adjust the display by tracking eye movement in real time. Lenticular displays work by coating an otherwise 2D panel with an array of tiny lenses called lenticules that then direct light from the panel’s pixels into each eye. The brain then stitches the images together and interprets them as a 3D image. The passive 3D system (passive in the sense that active shutter glasses are not required) and eye tracking means that only one person will be able to experience the 3D effects at a time; however, that person will be able to view the image at a wider variety of viewing angles than otherwise possible without eye tracking.

D2000-500.jpg

The 20" inch panel has been dubbed the DX2000, and will retail in Korea this month for $1,200 USD according to a LG press release. A wider release to other markets are expected later in the year, and the display model will be known as the D2000.

Source: Cnet Asia

Still in the market for a 3D display? Samsung has a set for you

Subject: Displays | July 8, 2011 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, 3d display, tn lcd, 1080p

Since the 3D market is not confusing enough Samsung has decided to implement their own way of displaying 3D images using shutter glasses, which is incompatible with NVIDIA's glasses.  On the plus side, as long as you have Samsung's glasses you will be able to display 3D from any source with any semi-modern graphics card.  The SyncMaster SA950 is a 1080x1920 TN LCD with a very reflective finish and comes with stylish active shutter glasses powered by a single lithium disk battery.  X-bit Labs put on the goggles and tried the 3D experience from both 3D sources and using the onboard processor to make 3D visuals out of 2D sources, with mixed but fairly positive results.

xbt_SyncMaster_SA950.jpg

"This time we are going to talk about a new 27-inch 3D monitor from Samsung that uses its own proprietary technologies for 3D imaging that work without drivers or any other additional software."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: X-Bit Labs

D-Link releases WiDi adapter

Subject: General Tech, Displays | June 20, 2011 - 04:03 AM |
Tagged: widi, D-Link

There are a lot of benefits of having a home theatre PC but still one major drawback: having the PC by the TV. Intel has worked hard to find a solution and released the specification under the name “WiDi”, a wireless display specification that lets you share your monitor with an HDTV attached to a wireless receiver box. D-Link has just recently launched their WiDi receiver in the US with Canada coming next month; will WiDi start picking up market share with more capable devices?

DHD-131_front.png

Why do network appliances these days look like pillows?

(Image from D-Link)

The D-Link MainStage (known as DHD-131 to its friends) has only a power cable to its name apart from your choice of video and audio connection to your TV or sound system. For choice of connection you have two video options and three audio options: on the video side you have HDMI for your high-resolution viewing and standard RCA for your standard definition devices; on the audio side you have optical audio or HDMI for surround and white and red RCA for stereo. Apart from a power button and a reset button that is the whole of this unit.

DHD-131_back.jpg

Plastic case with on/off butty. Baby got back shots.

(Image from D-Link)

One thing that typically holds back other implementations of WiDi that I have seen, and I assume this is no exception, is latency. The slight lag when controlling a media program or browsing a website is acceptable however it would really hold back the use of a PC as a console replacement unless the video card is directly connected to the TV which is a definite shame but to be expected given the bandwidths over WiFi that we are talking about. If you happen to be interested in this solution, however, it retails for just under 130$.

Source: HotHardware

The Next Generation is 3D HD SMARTBoards

Subject: General Tech, Displays | June 12, 2011 - 05:56 PM |
Tagged: SMART, 3d

SMART has been making interactive whiteboards for quite some time now. An interactive whiteboard is essentially a giant writing tablet similar to a Wacom. This tablet is also a projector screen which is often wall mounted but could be mounted on a cart. SMART Boards attach to PCs by USB and could attach to video and audio out if you purchase one with an attached projector and speakers rather than use your own. Recently SMART announced and released their fifth generation product line complete with a projector supporting HDMI input and active 3D technology.

35-planetsLesson.jpg

IT’S LIKE I CAN TOUCH YOU!

(Image by SMART Technologies)

While I can see this useful for companies that are doing 3D technology during their company, investor, and vendor meetings it seems a little bit unlikely that active 3D will appear in the classroom. It seems quite difficult for me to imagine twenty to forty students each with their own active shutter 3D glasses atop the investment of the 3D interactive whiteboard itself. Also while it might be to support the 3D functionality of the projector it seems quite odd to include HDMI functionality and barely exceed 720p resolution (1280x800) in your highest-end projector.

If an interactive whiteboard is in your interest but were holding out until you can pop things out at your audience the new SMART boards were available since May 25th in North America and May 30th internationally. Prices range between $3000 and $4000 US, computer not included. If you already have a digital whiteboard but want a 3D projector upgrade that will cost just north of 2000$.
Source: SMART

Is the InFocus 55" a wall tablet? Do you want it anyway?

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Systems | June 11, 2011 - 03:31 AM |
Tagged: wall tablet, InFocus

InFocus is branding their 55-inch touch-screen TV with Windows 7 embedded as a “Wall Tablet”. The writers down at HotHardware seem to take offense to a 55-inch device being called a tablet and I must agree. My duration working in high schools and acquiring an education degree grew me well acquainted with SMART boards and this product definitely recalls those memories much more vividly than my experience playing around with tablet devices.

The problem with touch screens in schools is that every screen is treated like one thereafter.

(Video from BusinessWire)

It is quite obvious that InFocus spent quite a large amount of time developing their user interface to dress up Windows 7 as a more whiteboard friendly operating system. Their interface has a custom file browser with annotation capabilities, a custom web browser, a digital whiteboard application, and a video conferencing solution that can interface with open protocols such as Google Talk and more proprietary ones such as Cisco. The unit itself has a 720p video camera and a screen resolution of 1920x1080 with multiple touch recognition, something that most (but not all) SMART boards are incapable of.

It is highly unlikely that you will have one of these $6000 devices in your house unless you happen to require it for professional reasons. For those in the education, training, research, or corporate management fields: a device like this could make your life much easier particularly if you were already considering installing a mass of SMART boards for this purpose. They are expected to ship to interested customers in July.

Source: HotHardware

Swap your displays CCFL with LEDs

Subject: Displays | May 31, 2011 - 12:09 PM |
Tagged: hack, mod, ccfl, led, repair

Over at Hack a Day is a video and project log of an industrious fellow whose digital picture frame backlight bit the biscuit.  Instead of buying a new one he removed the dead CCFL and replaced it with a six dollar LED strip instead of an expensive inverter or lamp for the CCFL.  The project is not easy, especially if you wish to attempt this on a full sized monitor but there are tips and tricks that should help you on your way in the full post.

CCFL_repair.png

"[Fileark] had the backlight on his digital picture frame go out one day. These are generally Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamps which require an inverter to source the voltage necessary for proper operation. When they stop working, the inverter is usually to blame. Since that circuit is made up of pretty small surface mount circuitry, he decided to replace the backlight with LEDs rather than repair the inverter."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: Hack a Day

The Mobile Monitor Field Monitor Pro is a reverse tablet

Subject: Displays | May 19, 2011 - 02:40 PM |
Tagged: mobile monitor, field monitor

The Mobile Monitor Field Monitor Pro is a 15.4", 1280x800 monitor with a stand that sports a numpad.  Intended for use with a laptop via USB and DisplayPort it gives you extra viewing area when you are on the go, as well as the numpad that most laptops lack.  Tweaktown tried it out in a variety of ways, discovering that it is not really for gaming or movie watching but more for those working with their laptop who need more space for spreadsheets and other productivity software.  If a couple of extra pounds sounds like a cheap price to pay for more screen area

check out the full review.

TT_field_monitor_pro.jpg

"With the introduction of the laptop, the mobile office was created. You could take your show on the road and get some serious work done. Of course, you still had some limitations. Even today you have limitations; unless you want to carry around a laptop that weighs 10-15 pounds you are stuck with a small screen size.

Fortunately, you do not have to buy a gigantic laptop or one with an extended screen that will cost you an arm and a leg. Mobile Monitor Technologies has something that can help to overcome this limitation; the Field Monitor Pro."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Source: Tweaktown

Can you really stream uncompressed 1080p wirelessly with the brite-View Air SyncHD

Subject: Displays | May 2, 2011 - 06:46 PM |
Tagged: widi, wireless, hd, 1080p, stream

Wireless video streaming is nothing new to PC Perspective, in 2010 we saw Intel's WiDi technology and Ryan was streaming 1080p Iron Man using the Galaxy GeForce GTX 460 WHDI card (aka Little Cthulhu).  A new way to achieve the same results is with the brite-View Air SyncHD which Missing Remote just reviewed.  Read on to see if this is worth ~$230 of your hard earned money.

MR_airsynch.png

"If wirelessly transmitting a Blu-ray stream (which tops out around 50mbps) is questionable, transmitting uncompressed 1080p/60 video seems downright impossible. Yet, that is exactly what brite-View claims to do with their Air SyncHD transmission kit. In a nutshell, the brite-View Air SyncHD transmission kit promises to wirelessly bridge an HDMI source device and HDMI receiving device, freeing you to place the devices anywhere within the system’s wireless range. Further, the system manages to send 1080p/60 video, audio and infrared (IR) with less than one millisecond latency up to 66 feet. It sounds great on paper, but can it deliver?"

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

CAT6 could beat DisplayPort at its own game

Subject: General Tech, Displays | May 2, 2011 - 11:43 AM |
Tagged: hdcp, cat6, gefen

Gefen is not a famous company but they are one with an interesting idea that they've just made real.  They will sell you a box that can extend a HDCP compliant signal along CAT6 cable of up to 1920x 1200  resolution as far as 200'.  It can send a 2560 x 1600 using a pair of CAT 6 cables, though that signal does not seem to be HDCP compliant.  The only down side is the price, at $1300 this is not something you buy because it is neat, but because you really need it.

GefenDVIDLCAT6.jpg

"CHATSWORTH, CA – The leader in digital connectivity announced the release of its new extender for professional computer systems using dual link DVI graphics. The DVI DL CAT-6 Extender offers a plug and play method of signal extension that guarantees a lossless video transmission with zero signal dropouts.

The next generation DVI DL CAT-6 Extender delivers uncompressed high resolution video to any remote display up to 200 feet (60m) in distance over two industry-standard CAT-6 cables. This is a substantial advantage over previous solutions, which required an add-on booster using more expensive cabling to handle distances beyond five meters. "

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Gefen

The ASUS PA246Q, professional quality without the price

Subject: Displays | April 11, 2011 - 06:22 PM |
Tagged:

If you decide on a IPS LCD as opposed to the more common TN variety, you obviously care more about proper colour replication that you do your bank account.  ASUS seems to have aimed for a middle ground with their 24" 1920x1200 PA246Q ProArt IPS LCD which you can get for under $500.  Could ASUS pull off the low price without sacrificing quality? 

Find out at Hardware Canucks.

 

 

"For many discerning users, the current crop of inexpensive 24" monitors sporting TN technology don't even come close to offering the quality they are looking for. Unfortunately, stepping up to an IPS-totting panel meant shelling out well over $600 but ASUS is now offering another route. Their ProArt 24" monitor seems to offer the impossible: an IPS panel, factory calibrated settings and good response times for under $500. Is this too good to be true?"

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

  Displays

A reasonably priced 27" gaming panel; the HP 2711x

Subject: Displays | March 31, 2011 - 01:54 PM |
Tagged:

At $350 the 27" 1920 x 1080 Hewlett Packard Pavilion 2711Xwill get you gaming on a big screen without the bill that a 30" monster will cost you.  Like most TN+ panels this HP display looks gorgeous, as long as you are head on to the monitor, TN+ panels sacrifice viewing angle for price.  TechReviewSource were quite impressed overall, however they warn those who are only interested in grayscale performance and multimedia features might want to look elsewhere.

"Whether you're working with multi-page documents and spreadsheets or fragging your way to glory in the latest first person shooter, it's almost always better on a big screen. Enter the HP 2711x, a slender, 27-inch monitor that delivers good color and motion performance and is eco- friendly as well. However, you don't get many extras with this model, and it has grayscale and viewing angle issues."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

  Displays

One pair of 3D glasses to rule them all?

Subject: Displays | March 16, 2011 - 05:27 PM |
Tagged:

As their name implies the XPAND X103 Universal 3D Glasses are intended to work with any active shutter 3D displays, saving you from purchasing multiple pairs.  MissingRemote couldn't pass up the chance to test this, especially as they have access to several 3D enabled displays from different vendors.  Seeing as the price of the glasses is in line with other single use styles, if the compatibility claims are correct you will save yourself some money down the road.  As it turns out, with a little calibration work, they do indeed live up to their name.

"This wouldn’t be so bad if the glasses were inexpensive, but with glasses costing over $100 each, not too many consumers are going to be stockpiling glasses for a rare group viewing. Furthermore, those 3D glasses might be worthless if a 2nd 3D display or replacement 3D display is purchased from another manufacturer. This is where XPAND steps in and attempts to alleviate the problem with their line of universal 3D glasses. Today, we’ll be taking a look at the XPAND X103 universal 3D glasses."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

  Displays

The new 30" king - NEC's PA301w LCD

Subject: Displays | March 1, 2011 - 02:19 PM |
Tagged:

The NEC PA301w is a new choice for those looking to game on a 30" screen at 2560 x 1600 with a 10-bit P-IPS type LCD. 
While it does have some unique features like inbuilt support for the X-Rite i1D2 colorimeter and a built-in KVM USB switch but it lacks other features you might expect such as an HDMI in.  In the end AnandTech proclaimed it "the best 30-inch display - heck, monitor in general - that I've tested yet. If you can stomach the $2,300 price tag."

Source: AnandTech

From CRT to LED and MDA to UXGA

Subject: Displays | January 24, 2011 - 02:29 PM |
Tagged:

Ars Technica looks back at the technology that has affected users experiences the most over the years, the display.  From the old monochrome screens with your choice of black and orange, black and green or black and white, to the new displays capable of 1600x1200 and over 4 billion colours.  More than just the pixel count and response rate have changed over the years.

Source: Ars Technica

The HP HP ZR30w ... lots of monitor with not many features

Subject: Displays | January 12, 2011 - 06:19 PM |
Tagged:

Hewlett-Packard's ZR30w 30" widescreen LCD has a lot of screen real estate but when it comes to features some might find it a bit lacking.  There are no analog connections whatsoever, only DisplayPort and DVI, not even HDMI.  As well as the lack of inputs, you may find the lack of any sort of OSD even more disappointing.  You have only basic controls for your brightness but nothing for colour temperature or any other variables you might wish to use.&n

A bargain on a 42"+ LCD ... from Vizio?!

Subject: Displays | December 9, 2010 - 01:16 PM |
Tagged:

Gizmodo noticed a bit of a trend from reviewers of the new XVT series from Vizio, a company that does not tend to be viewed in a positive light.  However with this new series the reviewers are actually liking it, not as the perfect HDTV but as being better than average at everything, with a good price for a 42"+ HD TV.  Check it out for yourself; if you are embarrassed by the brand you could always cover it with electrical tape.

Source: Gizmodo

Dreaming of a multi-monitor Christmas?

Subject: Displays | November 26, 2010 - 11:58 AM |
Tagged:

If you have on your wish list a GPU capable of multiple monitor gaming, be it EyeFinity or nVIDIA Surround and a two or three pack of monitors, you might have forgotten one wee thing will detract from your joy.  Lining up all those monitors on a desk and trying to keep them from moving or being of a slightly different height is not particularly easy; unless you pick up a multi-monitor stand.  Barring those with the skills to weld one together themselves, you might want to cons

Source: Phoronix

Now three choices to wirelessly stream HD audio and video to your TV

Subject: Displays | October 26, 2010 - 01:32 PM |
Tagged:

The Warpia Wireless USB PC to TV A/V Display Adaptor is another new way to stream content to your TV wirelessly,
added to a variety of ways including one from Intel and one that major display manufacturers are developing.  There are two adaptors, one is USB for your laptop and the other sports VGA and HDMI

ASUS assembles a 3D TV kit

Subject: Displays | October 13, 2010 - 04:02 PM |
Tagged:

The ASUS VG236H 120Hz LCD Monitor 3D-Vision set includes the aforementioned monitor as well as an nVIDIA 3D Vision gaming kit including your active 3D glasses and IR transmitter.  At $500 it will set you back roughly the same amount as picking up the nVIDIA 3D kit and a 23" 120MHz display separately,
this just adds some convenience to the purchase.  Benchmark reviews tried out this kit on both a single display as well as a triple display setup, powered by a