Deep Cool's first watercooler, the Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 31, 2014 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool, Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240, LCS, water cooling

The Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240 has a unique look with its LED and bright red fans but also hides a pump with a closed impeller which is intended to increase the performance at the same time as it reduces vibrations.  As the name implies the radiator roughly 240mm in size, 274 x 120 x 27mm to be exact with 0.2mm high-density water micro channels.  HiTech Legion tested it against a variety of coolers and found the performance to be similar to the competitions, though unfortunately at a much higher price point.  However it was almost silent in operation and the fans could be run on low speed without effecting the performance so for those who have a strong desire for a silent system might be willing to pay the $106 MSRP.

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"Deep Cool has done this with their first liquid CPU cooler, the Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240 AIO Liquid Cooling. Do we see the force of a Maelstrom being represented? You be the judge. They use a unique pump with closed impeller to offer more power, less vibration, and lower noise as a result."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Cooler Master Announces Nepton 120XL and Nepton 240M All-In-One Liquid CPU Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 21, 2014 - 04:15 PM |
Tagged: Nepton 240M, Nepton 120XL, Nepton, cooler master, all in one

They are not quite available yet but Cooler Master have announced two new all in one watercoolers, the Nepton 120XL and 240M which incorporate a new Silencio fan which as you may expect offers good performance with low noise.  If the pricing follows the previous generation of Nepton you can expect to see the 120mm model retail for around $100 and the 240mm for around $120. 

Taipei, Taiwan — Oct 21st 2014 — Cooler Master, a leading creator, innovator, and manufacturer of desktop components and peripherals as well as mobile accessories today announced the Nepton 120XL and 240M, the latest additions to the Nepton all-in-one liquid cooling family. See full details on the Nepton 240M product page here.

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Keeping It Cool
Nepton 120XL and 240M are introducing a brand new Silencio fan from Cooler Master. This fan is designed with unique fan blades and technology in order to maximize air flow and static pressure with minimal noise output. The result of these fans and Nepton’s skived fin micro-channel technology brings Nepton 120XL and 240M to a whole new level of cool, mirroring the thermal success of the Nepton 140XL and 280L models.

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Maximum Compatibility
The Cooler Master Nepton series was introduced with the 140XL and 280L models, which sported 140mm and 280mm radiators respectively. The new Nepton 120XL is equipped with a 120mm radiator while the Nepton 240M is equipped with a 240mm radiator. These sizes allow more opportunity for builders and enthusiasts to get their hands on the incredible performance from the Nepton line.

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Sealing the Deal
Using Cooler Master’s exclusive design, the pump of the Nepton series pushed 120 Liters of liquid per hour through the flexible and robust FEP tubing to maximize thermal transfer. Topping the pump with a simple geometric design and illuminated Cooler Master logo, the Nepton series continues to turn heads. Backed by a 5-year warranty, Nepton 120XL and 240M will be cooling systems for years to come.

Availability
Nepton 120XL and 240M is now shipping to vendors in North America and will be available soon. Price and availability may vary based on region.

Corsair's HX1000i is good, but not quite great

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 21, 2014 - 02:26 PM |
Tagged: modular psu, HX1000i, Corsair Link, corsair, 80 Plus Platinum

Corsair have updated their high end and high powered PSU line with the HX1000i, developed once again with CWT and sporting an 80 PLUS Platinum rating and Corsair Link integration.  The documentation is a little confusing, referring to a single 12v rail rated at 83.3A or 1000W but also mentioning it can be toggled to multiple 12V rails, not to mention the small rounding error in their math.  The actual PSU is very well constructed and passed all of the tests that [H]ard|OCP's torture chamber required of it; just not to the same level that the older HX1000 unit managed.  That is a little disappointing as you would hope that the quality would improve over time but it is in line with the competition and certainly not a bad showing, merely not what [H] had hoped for.   It is still worth your consideration so make sure to read through the whole review to see if the HX1000i meets your needs.

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"Corsair's HX series represents its "second tier" line of enthusiast computer power supplies, but its new HX1000i does take the top spot when it comes to its ~1000 watt power supplies that are Platinum certified and fully modular. Let's see if this latest addition from Corsair represents its quality pedigree of days gone by. "

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

FanlessTech Shows Gigantic, Unreleased Heatsinks

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 19, 2014 - 04:52 PM |
Tagged:

There are many interesting ways to pull heat away from a processor. You can submerge your device in mineral oil or even phase-change fluid (such as "Novec"). You can push cool fluid up to the thing that you are trying to remove heat from and then pump it away through a radiator. If using air, you can make use of vapor chambers and the convection current formed as devices heat up. The goal is to abuse one or more interesting material properties to store energy and move it somewhere else.

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Image Credit: HT4U.net

Or you can just have an obscene, gigantic mass of metal with more fins than the NHL. According to FanlessTech, these are three heatsinks that are not yet available (and may never be). Two of them have three towers, connected to the base by heat pipes, and the last one has four.

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Image Credit: ExtraHardware.cz

Personally, I would be a bit uncomfortable about buying a PC like that unless I needed absolutely silent or top air cooling performance. The amount that it hangs over RAM or nuzzles against add-in boards seems sketchy to me, especially if you need to swap a DIMM or two at some point, but I always use stock coolers at reference voltage and frequency so what do I know?

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Image Credit: PConline.com.cn

Yes, that would be a regular, ATX motherboard.

When will these prototypes become available? Who knows if they even will. Still, if you have a need for cooling solutions that are a little over-the-top, you might be able to get your hands on these some day. There's nothing wrong with adding more mass and surface area, rather than doing something fancy. It works, and it probably works really well.

Source: FanlessTech

Did you know XFX makes enclosures too?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 16, 2014 - 06:48 PM |
Tagged: xfx, Series Bravo, Type-01

XFX has expanded into the enclosure market with a case priced to take on big names like Corsair and Thermaltake.  It is visually unique on the outside, especially with there watercooling grommets which are designed differently than you see on other cases.  The Type-01 is fairly large, 518 x 232 x 562mm (26.6 x 13 x 22.2") and can hold up to eleven 2.5/3.5" drives of which five can be reconfigure to only fit 2.5" drives which will increase the maximum allowable length of your GPU to 14" from a mere 12".  The Tech Report appreciated the design of the front power and reset buttons, as they are socketed you can remove the front panel without having wires still connecting it to the case.  There are many things to like about this case especially if you are using air cooling but there is one caveat, this case will not support 240mm radiators so be forewarned if that was your plan.  Check out the whole review to see the other features XFX added to this case.

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"The Type-01 Series Bravo Edition is XFX's first entry into the PC enclosure market. Priced at $129.99, this stylish enclosure faces some fierce competition, most notably from Corsair's Obsidian Series 450D. We've put the Bravo through its paces to see if it's a worthy contender."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Aerocool Launches Colorful and Practical Xpredator Cube Chassis

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 15, 2014 - 12:49 AM |
Tagged: SFF case, SFF, mini ITX, micro ATX, aerocool

A Taiwanese company called Aerocool Advanced Technologies (with a US disivision known as Aerocool US) recently unboxed a cube-shaped computer case that is both colorful and practical. The new Xpredator Cube joins the existing Xpredator lineup as a small form factor (micro ATX or mini ITX) option that comes in Red, Black, Orange, White, and Green color options for $125.90.

Measuring 280x418x412mm, the Xpredator Cube has a futuristic design with lots of sharp angles. Large “shell like” adjustable vents align along the top of the case along with a storage compartment and the front Io panel. The front of the case is dominated by a large mesh intake vent with angled sides and a single 5.25” bay. The left side features a side panel window that shows off the top half of the case (motherboard area).

Aerocool Xpredator Cube Green SFF Chassis.png

Front IO on the Xpredator Cube includes two USB 3.0 ports, two audio jacks, a power button, and two fan speed dials for the built in fan controller (maximum of 15W per channel).

The aesthetics are welcome, but the internals are where the small form factor cube shines. The new Xpredator series case is divided into two main compartments. A horizontal divider holds the horizontally mounted removable motherboard tray. The tray matches the external color of the case while the rest of the case internals (minus the tool-less drive rails) is black. It features a CPU cutout and multiple rubber grommets to facilitate cable routing. The case has four exposed PCI slots that can support graphics cards up to 320mm in length (or 345mm with the front case fan removed). The case can accommodate tower coolers up to 187mm tall or an internally mounted water cooling radiator up to 280mm (sans optical drive). Alternatively, the case has two water cooling grommets to support a larger external radiator.

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Bundled cooling include a 200mm front intake fan (800 RPM, 53.4 CFM, 26.5dBA) and a single 140mm exhaust fan (1200 RPM, 5948 CFM, 27.6 dBA). From there, users can add up three additional 140mm fans. The top of the case has angled vents that can be opened or closed with a slider on the left edge.

The bottom half of the case has space for a vertically mounted power supply and a tool-less hard drive bay that can hold three 3.5” or 2.5” drives. The case has a vent on the right side of the case for the power supply fan along with a removable magnetic dust filter. In addition to the hard drive bay, users can fit two 2.5” solid state drives under the 5.25” bay.

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Aerocool further includes rubber pads for the power supply and hard drives to reduce shock which is nice considering the LAN party readiness of this case.

The new case was not available for purchase at the time of writing, but it should be for sale soon with a MSRP of $125.90.

The Aerocool Xpredator Cube looks to be a nice looking, easy to build in case. I’m looking forward to the full reviews of course, but if it holds up to the specifications it should be a popular small form factor option! 

Source: Aerocool

Seasonic's Platinum 1050 beats everything but its predecessor

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 7, 2014 - 05:42 PM |
Tagged: seasonic, Platinum-1050, modular psu, kilowatt, hybrid silent fan, 80 Plus Platinum

Lee just wrapped up a review of Seasonic's 1050 and 1200W Platinum PSU's but why not revisit the powerful 1050W PSU in [H]ard|OCP's latest PSU review.  Their testing methodology differs from Lee's as does the hardware used to test it.  This way you get even more information about how this PSU functions under differing conditions and you will be more informed about your possible purchase.  Reading the whole review is the best way to fully understand this fully modular PSU's strengths but if you insist on skipping to the conclusion then this PSU is both better than the competition and less expensive.  The only constructive criticism that [H] could offer was that it does not really improve in any major way over Seasonic's previouslt released 1000W PSU.

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"Seasonic is one of our long-time favorites when it comes to truly high-end power supplies. The new PLATINUM-1050 PSU claims to deliver excellent power efficiency and does so with a fully modular design. Seasonic is often known designing products with excellent sound profiles. Does the PLATINUM-1050 fit the profile?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Thermaltake's Core V51 offers a lot of choice to the system builder

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 6, 2014 - 06:29 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Core V51, air cooling, water cooling

The Thermaltake Core V51 Mid-Tower does not have a flashy exterior but the simple aesthetics should appeal to certain segments of the population.  At 540 x 236 x 560mm (21 x 9 x 22") it is smaller than many of the cases we have seen released to the market but still has room for an eATX board inside as well as a Morry sized cooler.  The cooling design is quite flexible, in several places you can choose to mount multiple 120/140mm fans or a single monstrous 200mm if you possess one; those who prefer watercooling are able to place 420mm rads in two places or smaller ones in numerous other places.  [H]ard|OCP loved the performance and flexibilty of this case, as well as the $110 asking price, which together were enough to win a coveted Gold Award.

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"Thermaltake has some very lofty goals set for its new mid-tower case. Its primary goal is to deliver outstanding cooling performance which is always high on our priority list as well. Form and function both seem to be well served in this new Core V51 model as its performance profile is not hard on the eyes."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Cooler Master Hyper 612 Ver. 2 Heatsink Released

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 2, 2014 - 05:25 PM |
Tagged: hyper 612, heatsink, fanless, cooler master, cooler

The Cooler Master Hyper 612 Ver. 2 CPU cooler is a member of their "Hyper Series", upper-mainstream product lineup. It looks to be one of the (if not the) biggest offerings in that category. Its extreme dimensions are 139mm (5.47") in length by 102mm (4.02") wide, with a height of 160.4mm (6.32"). It has a 120mm fan which basically takes up a whole side and slowly blows air across it. Some sites claim that it can be used fanless with some (but not every) CPU.

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Cooler Master is particularly proud of their "Continuous Direct Contact" technology. In other words, the heat pipes are flattened into a contact with the CPU's heatspreader (or die guard for people like Morry). This eliminates a reservoir of heat before the copper pipes can carry it to the aluminum fins and out into the air.

The heatsink is now available, but no pricing information yet (I cannot find it online).

Need an extreme cooling fan?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 29, 2014 - 03:48 PM |
Tagged: noctua, water

The colours of the Noctua Industrial PPC family of fans are familiar but these 8 fans have some serious tricks up their sleeves.  While most fans focus on the amount of air they can move and how quietly they can manage that feat these fans are also rated on how harsh the conditions can be while they can maintain full functionality.  For instance the IP67 fans will operate perfectly even when submerged in water to a depth of 1m and provide complete protection against dust if used in air.  While it is unlikely your computer will function when submerged there are builds which could take advantage of the ability to move water around.  Generally these fans are intended for use cooling systems that reside in industrial plants and other harsh conditions but it is nice to know you can pick up fans specifically designed to operate in very dusty or wet environments.  Check out the review at Modders Inc if the idea of having a ruggedized cooling system appeals to you.

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"The Noctua Industrial PPC line packaging is similarly Spartan like the new Noctua Redux line, packed without extras such as adapters, splitters and alternate mounting options but comes with a 4-piece screw mounting kit."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Modders Inc

EVGA Live Stream! Learn about Maxwell, X99 and Win Prizes!!

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Motherboards, Cases and Cooling | September 28, 2014 - 12:25 AM |
Tagged: X99, video, maxwell, live, GTX 980, GTX 970, evga

UPDATE: If you missed the live stream with myself and Jacob, you can catch the entire event in the video below. You won't want to miss out on seeing the first ever GTX 980 water block as well as announcements on new Torq mice!

EVGA has been a busy company recently. It has continued to innovate with new coolers for the recent GTX 980 and GTX 970 card releases, newer power supplies offer unique features and improved quality and power output, a new line of X99 chipset motherboards including a Micro ATX variant and hey, the company even released a line of high-performance mice this year! PC Perspective has covered basically all of these releases (and will continue to do so with pending GPU and MB reviews) but there is a lot that needs explaining.

To help out, an industry and community favorite will be stopping by from EVGA to the PC Perspective offices: Jacob Freeman. You might know him as @EVGA_JacobF on Twitter or have seen him on countless forums, but he will making an in-person appearance on Friday, September 26th on PC Perspective Live! We plan on discussing the brand new ACX 2.0 cooler on the Maxwell GPUs released last week, go over some of highlights of the new X99 motherboards and even touch on power supplies and the Torq mice line as well.

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EVGA GTX 980/970, X99, PSU and Torq Live Stream featuring Jacob Freeman

3pm ET / 12pm PT - September 26th

PC Perspective Live! Page

EVGA has been a supporter of PC Perspective for a long time and we asked them to give back to our community during this live stream - and they have stepped up! Look at this prize list:

How can you participate and win these awesome pieces of hardware? Just be here at 3pm ET / 12pm PT on http://www.pcper.com/live and we'll be announcing winners as we go for those that tune in. It really couldn't be more simple!

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If you have questions you want to ask Jacob about EVGA, or any of its line of products, please leave them in the comments section below and we'll start compiling a list to address on the live stream Friday. Who knows, we may even save some prizes for some of our favorite questions!

To make sure you don't miss our live stream events, be sure you sign up for our spam-free PC Perspective Live! Mailing List. We email that group a couple hours before each event gets started.

Fanless, SFF or heavy weights, check out the best in quiet coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 23, 2014 - 03:45 PM |
Tagged: heatsink, air cooling, water cooling, quiet

Silent PC Review has just done a major update to their lists of the best Big, Small and Fanless coolers, both air and water.  The Big list requires a fair sized case in which to contain the cooler and consists of those coolers which operate at 20 dBA or less from 1m away with no more than 45°C rise over ambient.  The graph starts with the loudest 20dBA and grows more quiet with the measured temperature appearing at the noise level they tested, those with multiple values have adjustable speeds.  The Small list has the same setup but consists of coolers that should fit in most SFF cases and the fanless lacks noise ratings for obvious reasons.  Check them all out here.

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"Recommended Heatsinks lists SPCR-reviewed top cooling devices for CPUs, VGA and other hot computer parts, ordered by cooling performance and low noise. Major update on 16 Sept 2014."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Microsoft's Universal Mobile Keyboard Is Coming Soon

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | September 17, 2014 - 06:57 PM |
Tagged: windows, mobile, microsoft, keyboard, ios, Android

Let me share a story. There was a time, around the first Surface launch, that I worked in an electronics retail store (and the several years prior -- but I digress). At around that time, Microsoft was airing ads with people dancing around, clicking keyboards to the Surface tablet with its magnetic click or snap. One day, a customer came in looking for the keyboard from the TV spots for their iPad. I thought about it for a few seconds and realized how terrible Microsoft's branding actually was.

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Without already knowing the existence of their Windows 8 and RT tablets, which the ads were supposed to convey, it really did look like an accessory for an iPad.

Doing Microsoft's job for them, I explained the Surface Pro and Surface RT tablets along with its keyboard-cover accessories. Eventually, I told them that it was a Microsoft product for their own tablet brand and would not see an iPad release. The company felt threatened by these mobile, touch devices and was directly competing with them.

...

So Microsoft is announcing a keyboard for Windows, Android, and iOS. Sure, it is very different from the Type and Touch Covers; for instance, it does not attach to these devices magnetically. Microsoft has also been known to develop hardware, software, and services for competing platforms. While it is not unsurprising that Microsoft keyboards would work on competing devices, it does feel weird for their keyboard to have features that are specialized for these competing platforms.

There are three things interesting about this keyboard: it has a built-in stand, it has special keys for Android and iOS that are not present in Windows, and it has a built-in rechargeable battery that lasts up to 6 months. The peripheral pairs wirelessly with all of these devices through Bluetooth.

The Microsoft Universal Mobile Keyboard is coming soon for $79.95 (MSRP).

Source: Microsoft

Microsoft Announces Wired Xbox One Controller for Windows

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | September 17, 2014 - 03:55 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, xbox, xbone, xbox one, controller, gamepad

A few months ago, Microsoft released 32- and 64-bit drivers for their Xbox One controller on Windows 7 and Windows 8. This was for wireless controllers attached by micro-USB to a PC. Now, Microsoft announced a new controller for Windows: the same controller, only bundled with the required cable. In fact, it can still connect wirelessly... to an Xbox One, not a PC.

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The bundle will cost $59.95 (MSRP) and be available starting in November. As far as I can tell, the PC cannot update the Xbox One Controller's firmware; for that, you apparently need an Xbox One handy. It is possible that Microsoft will implement this, or already has and no-one is talking about it, but you might want to hold off until we know for a fact. One update adjusts analog stick sensitivity; this could be important, especially if you have multiple controllers at different patch levels. Yes, some PC games allow local multiplayer.

Corsair's quiet HX1000i PSU could be with you for a long time

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 17, 2014 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: PSU, corsair, HXi Series, HX1000i, kilowatt, 80 Plus Platinum, Corsair Link

Before even delving into the specifications there are two very attractive features about the Corsair HX1000i modular PSU, it has an 80 Plus Platinum rating and a 7 year warranty.  The 12V rail is capable of delivering 999.6W @ 83.3A and once a small bug in Corsair Link is solved you can actually program the PSU to either provide a single 12V rail or multiple rails.  With eight 6+2 PCIe power connectors you can power even the most demanding of video cards and the dozen SATA power connectors also make it perfect for those with a storage fetish.  At $230 it is not that expensive for a PSU of this power and one of TechPowerUp's favourite things about the PSU was the quiet performance even under load.  Check out the review to get the full picture.

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"Corsair just introduced the new HXi series, comprised of members with Platinum efficiency and full compatibility with the Corsair Link software. Today, we will take a look at the second-strongest unit of the line with 1 kW capacity, ideal for a power-hungry system with up to four VGAs."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: techPowerUp

Logitech G910 Orion Spark RGB Mechanical Keyboard Announced for November at $179.99

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | September 17, 2014 - 04:04 AM |
Tagged: mechanical keyboard, logitech, g910 orion spark rgb, g910

The newly announced Logitech G910 Orion Spark RGB mechanical keyboard is based on their own mechanical switch, developed in partnership with Omron, dubbed "Romer-G". It supports 16.8 million colors in the backlight under each individual key. Logitech will provide software to control this lighting and an SDK for developers to integrate custom functionality into their game. It includes nine macro buttons with three profiles.

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The Romer-G switch is (at least currently) exclusive to this keyboard. It is designed with a very small actuation point, 1.5mm from the top of the key. This means that you finger will need to travel less distance, and thus take less time, before the action is registered. From a feeling standpoint, they have a soft spring and a tactile bump at the point of actuation, but no click. Logitech did not comment on whether the G910 contains o-rings to further dampen the sound.

The switches are designed for high durability as well, with an expected lifespan of 70 million keystrokes (compared to 50 million advertised by Cherry and 60 million for Razer). That said, mechanical switches are designed to be put in industrial and medical devices and left unmaintained for decades, so I am not sure how practical that advantage will be.

Their partner, Omron, also collaborates with Logitech on mechanical switches for mice.

The Logitech G910 Orion Spark RGB in planned to be released this November for $179.99.

Source: Logitech G

AMD R9 390X Is Rumored Liquid Cooled

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Cases and Cooling | September 15, 2014 - 05:50 PM |
Tagged: amd, R9, r9 390x, liquid cooler, liquid cooling, liquid cooling system, asetek

Less than a year after the launch of AMD's R9 290X, we are beginning to hear rumors of a follow-up. What is being called the R9 390X, because if it is called anything else, then that was a very short-lived branding scheme, might be liquid cooled. This would be the first single-processor, reference graphics card to have an integrated water cooler. That said, the public evidence is not as firm as I would normally like.

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Image Credit: Baidu Forums

According to Tom's Hardware, Asetek is working on a liquid-cooled design for "an undisclosed OEM". The product is expected to ship during the first half of 2015 and the press release claims that it will "continue Asetek's success in the growing liquid cooling market". Technically, this could be a collaboration with an AIB partner, not necessarily a GPU developer. That said, the leaked photograph looks like a reference card.

We don't really know anything more than this. I would expect that it will be a refresh based on Hawaii, but that is pure speculation. I have no evidence to support that.

Personally, I would hope that a standalone air-cooled model would be available. While I have no experience with liquid cooling, it seems like a bit extra of a burden that not all purchasers of a top-of-the-line single GPU add-in board would want to bare. Specifically, placing the radiator if their case even supports it. That said, having a high-performing reference card will probably make the initial benchmarks look extra impressive, which could be a win in itself.

Corsair's big and beautiful Graphite Series 780T

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 12, 2014 - 05:10 PM |
Tagged: xl atx, Graphite Series 780T, corsair

Corsair's Graphite Series 780T is a large case at 602 x 288 x 637mm (23.7 x 11.3 x 25.1") capable of fitting even XL ATX boards.  That gives you a total of 9 drive bays though only 6 can support a full sized 3.5" drive.  It comes with three 140mm fans but is also capable of fitting several radiators of up to 360mm in some positions.  While the size makes it appropriate for use as a small server the looks and layout also make it perfect for a high end enthusiast system with multiple GPUs.  [H]ard|OCP were so impressed with the performance and feature set of this case that they gave it a Gold Award so you know this case is worthy of the Graphite name.

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"Today we review a case from Corsair that will fit many more enthusiasts' needs, the Graphite Series 780T chassis with room for huge motherboards. This full tower comes with lots and lots of water cooling in mind, a built in fan controller, smartly designed hard drive and solid state drive housing, and has a Companion Cube-ish look."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Intel Loves Exponential Trends: Shrinking Mini-PCs

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Systems, Shows and Expos | September 12, 2014 - 02:20 PM |
Tagged: idf, idf 2014, nuc, Intel, SFF, small form factor

A few years ago, Intel introduced the NUC line of small form factor PCs. At this year's IDF, they have announced plans to make even smaller, and cheaper, specifications that are intended for OEMs to install Windows, Linux, Android, and Chrome OS on. This initiative is not yet named, but will consist of mostly soldered components, leaving basically just the wireless adapters user-replaceable, rather than the more user-serviceable NUC.

intel-idf-mini-pc.jpg

Image Credit: Liliputing

Being the owner of Moore's Law, they just couldn't help but fit it to some type of exponential curve. While it is with respect to generation, not time, Intel expects the new, currently unnamed form factor to halve both the volume (size) and bill of material (BOM) cost of the NUC. They then said that another generation after ("Future SFF") will halve the BOM cost again, to a quarter of the NUC.

What do our readers think? Would you be willing to give up socketed components for smaller and cheaper devices in this category or does this just become indistinguishable from mobile devices (which we already know can be cheap and packed into small spaces)?

Source: Liliputing

Fanless Noctua NH-D15 Keeps 150W Xeon E5-2687W Cool

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | September 12, 2014 - 01:56 PM |
Tagged: fanless, passive cooling, noctua, NH-D15

Sure, humans may disagree that 67C (153F) is cool, but it is for a semiconductor. More impressive, it was the temperature recorded on a CPU with a 150W TDP attached to a fanless Noctua NH-D15. Does that mean it was noiseless? Nope. The test kept each of the case fans maxed out at 12V input DC (100%).

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This, without the fans.

Hardwareluxx does not specify how much air gets blown across the passive cooler. Their claim is that the case fans just ensure that the ambient temperature is as low as possible. That seems fair, but I could also, for instance, blow cool air through a 3-inch drier hose attached to a bathroom suction fan stuck out the window. That would certainly keep passive coolers chilled while only being technically fanless.

Theoretically, of course. I'm not saying it's something I did in high school or anything...

Depending on how long of a hose is used, it could even be noise in a different location (rather than case fans in the same PC). Still, cooling 150W is a feat in itself. Then again, with over two pounds of heat fins, it makes sense.

Source: Hardwareluxx