CODE Keyboard Is Probably Pretty Good

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 2, 2013 - 02:12 AM |
Tagged: WASD Keyboards, mechanical keyboard, keyboard, CODE

... But if you read the blog post, you would think it is the one keyboard to rule them all.

The CODE is the product, literally, of a collaboration between Stack Overflow co-founder Jeff Atwood and Weyman Kwong of WASD Keyboards. I recognize the tongue-in-cheek humor and I acknowledge that the team are clearly (that was not a Cherry MX switch pun... that I would admit to) well suited to the challenge of designing a keyboard for programmers.

code-trio.jpg

Before we run through the opinion, its key touted perks are:

  • Cherry MX Clear switches
    • Similar to Cherry MX Brown with much more resistance. Hard to bottom out.
  • DIP switches to customize functionality without software.
  • White LED backlighting
  • Very stable rubberized ergonomic flaps and angled pads.
  • Detachable Micro USB cable

The thing is, WASD Keyboards already allows users to purchase customized keyboards. As far as I can tell, the CODE is just a variant of the existing WASD V2 104-key Custom Mechanical Keyboard with white backlighting. Both Keyboards are priced at $149.99. The CODE limits your choice but provides you with the illuminated keys and the MX Clear switches, normally a $10 upgrade, in exchange for just taking what you are offered without question. Okay, you can ask for a 104-Key or an 87-Key version, so one question is allowed. Still, the CODE is a good value; as I mentioned, you basically get free key lighting and a free upgrade to Cherry MX Clear.

code-v2-87-dip2.jpg

But it is still not an epiphany for mechanical keyboard lovers.

At one point, I hoped to take some time for a hobby and modify a mechanical keyboard to fit my specifications. I envisioned an aluminum body enclosing solidly built buckle-spring keys. I did not know about Cherry MX Green switches at the time. For keycaps, I imagined two pieces of glass sandwiching a translucent white plastic sheet masked with a black symbol for each letter. I figure the feel of glass would be more pleasing to the fingers than warm plastic. Each key would, of course, be let from underneath with a soft white (blue-doped-white) LED. Each translucent sheet would softly diffuse the light except for the shadow of whatever characters the key represents.

That would be a revolution... for me. I think I would like the feel of cool glass under my fingers.

So I guess I leave the post with a question for the viewers: What would your "perfect" keyboard be?

Source: CODE

Cooler Master Elite 130 Is A Mini ITX Case With Full Mesh Front Panel

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 29, 2013 - 09:21 PM |
Tagged: mini ITX, htpc, elite 130, cooler master

Cooler Master recently released the Elite 130 Mini ITX case, which is an update to the existing Elite 120. The Elite 130 measures 9.4” x 8.1” x 14.9” (240mm x 205mm x 377.5mm) and will be available for under $50.

Cooler Master Elite 130 Angled.jpg

The Elite 130 weighs 6.8 pounds and is constructed of a steel alloy body with a polymer mesh front panel. The all black chassis has a mesh front panel with IO on the left and a single 5.25” drive bay. There is an 80mm vent on the right panel and a vent (without a fan) on the left side panel. The rear of the case features two PCI slots and a single rubber grommet for water cooling or USB 3.0 pass through cables. The case supports standard ATX power supplies through the use of an extension bracket. The PSU sticks out slightly from the back of the case and a vent on the case’s top panel allows for the power supply to pull in cool air from the outside rather than from the case internals.

Cooler Master Elite 130 Mini ITX Case Rear IO.jpg

Front IO on the Cooler Master Elite 130 includes two USB 3.0 ports and two audio jacks.

Internally, the Elite 130 supports a single 5.25” drive, two 3.5” hard drives, and a single solid state drive mounted in a side bracket. Alternatively, users can forgo an optical drive in favor of having three total 3.5” drives or four total 2.5” drives.

Cooler Master Elite 130 Cooling.jpg

The case comes pre-installed with a 120mm intake fan and users can add a single 80x15mm fan on the right side panel. Users can swap out the front intake fan for water cooling radiator.

The Elite 130 supports Mini ITX motherboards, graphics cards up to 13.5,” CPU coolers up to 2.5” tall, and power supplies up to 180mm long.

According to Maximum PC, the Cooler Master Elite 130 is available from Amazon for $43.26. The Mini ITX case comes with a two year warranty.

Lian Li Shows Off Massive PC-A79 Full Tower

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 28, 2013 - 04:18 PM |
Tagged: Lian Li, Lian Li PC-A79, full tower, e-atx, XL-ATX, hptx, aluminum

Lian Li recently showed off a new full tower case -- clad in the company’s traditional brushed aluminum -- called the PC-A79. The PC-A79 measures 24.3” x 9” x 23.4” and offers up ample space for high end PC components.

Lian Li PC-A79 Full Tower Workstation Case.jpg

On the outside, the Lian Li PC-A79 is covered in dark brushed aluminum. It has two front case feet and two rear wheels to make transporting the system easier. The front of the case hosts 12 individually filtered mesh 5.25” bay covers. There are also two LEDs for power and HDD activity in the top right corner of the front panel. The bezel surrounding the bay covers can be removed with needing tools to allow for easy removal of the bay covers and hard drives (depending on which way you install the hard drive cages). The left side panel comes with two pre-installed 120mm fans. Interestingly, Lian Li has designed a connector and routed the fan wires such that the side panel can be removed without needing to worry about disconnecting the fans. Additionally, the top of the case has a filtered vent that can hold up to two 140mm fans (or a 280mm radiator). The fans get screwed into a bracket which in turn is screwed into the top panel, making installation a bit easier.

Front IO on the PC-A79 is hidden under a cover on the front edge of the top panel. IO options include two audio jacks, four USB 3.0 ports, and a single eSATA port.

Rear IO includes six water cooling grommets, a single 120mm exhaust fan, a bottom-mounted PSU, and 11 PCI slots. There is a filter for the bottom mounted power supply that can be removed from the side of the case which is a nice option to have.

Internally, the full tower supports motherboards up to HTPX, E-ATX and XL-ATX in size, graphics cards up to 350mm (13.78”) in length, and CPU coolers up to 165mm (5.7”) tall. The PC-A79 comes with three hard drive cages, each of which can hold three 3.5” hard drives and two 2.5” solid state drives. In addition to the drive cages, users can mount two 2.5” drives on the bottom of the case for a total of nine 3.5” drives and eight SSDs. The drives mount into the cages using brushed aluminum brackets that double as handles. The drives slide into the cages and are locked in place by a thumbscrew latch. The case features a removable motherboard tray with a large CPU cutout and eight rubber grommets that allow for routing cables behind the motherboard tray.

Lian Li PC-A79 Full Tower Workstation Case Internals.jpg

The case supports up to seven total fans (not counting the PSU fan), including:

  • 2 x 120mm side panel fans
  • 3 x 120mm front panel fans (mounted on hard drive cages)
  • 2 x 120 or 140mm fans on top panel

The massive full tower case will be available in September with an MSRP of $389. While PC gamers may opt for more sylish cases, the Lian Li PC-A79 would be a good fit for workstation builds.

Source: Lian Li

Seasonic seems to be competing against its self with the X-Series

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 27, 2013 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: X-650, Seasonic X-Series, PSU, modular psu

Seasonic's X-650 PSU is fully modular, allowing you to choose exactly what cables you use though the ATX power is mandatory.  It has four 6+2 PCIe power connectors and can deliver 648W @ 54A to the 12V rail making this a solid choice for a multi-GPU system.  The performance on [H]ard|OCP's test bench was excellent, the only complaint they've had is that Seasonic really hasn't changed much about their PSUs in quite a while.  That might be a little boring for reviewers but for enthusiasts, great performance at a variety of wattage is a good thing.

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"Seasonic's X-Series computer power supply comes to us boasting a patented fully modular design that minimizes voltage drops and impedance while greatly maximizing efficiency, cooling, and overall performance. Being a Seasonic unit, we can also count on it targeting the users looking for a quiet computing experience."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Lian Li Shows Off PC-Q33 Prototype Mini ITX Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 25, 2013 - 06:34 PM |
Tagged: PC-Q33, mini ITX, Lian Li, aluminum

Lian Li recently posted information about a new prototype chassis on the Xtreme Systems forum. The new case, called the PC-Q33 is a Mini ITX chassis with a unique hinged front panel that allows unfettered access to the internal hardware. Coming in bare aluminum or black brushed aluminum, the case supports Mini ITX or Mini DTX motherboards, 220mm long graphics cards, 200mm long power supplies, and 180mm tall CPU coolers. The PC-Q33 itself measures 229mm (W) x 330mm (H) x 248mm (D) which works out to approximately 9” x 13” x 10”.

Lian Li PC-Q33 Mini-ITX case_front.jpg

Silver case feet hold up the case which has mesh grills on the front and both side panels. There is a mesh vent for a 120mm fan on the back of the case along with a vent on the bottom of the case for the bottom mounted power supply. Lian Li has stated that a removable dust filter may be added to the case if there is enough interest. Users can unscrew the side panels to access the hardware or additionally unscrew two thumscrews to release the top and front panels which open on a hinge to make installing all of the components easier.

Lian Li PC-Q33 Mini-ITX case.jpg

Internally, the case supports three 2.5” drives and two 3.5” drives. Drives can be installed in a cage below the motherboard or on the inside of the front panel. The back of the case features two grommets for water cooling tubes (for external radiators) along with a removable PSU bracket and two expansion slots (ie for a graphics card).

Lian Li has asked enthuiasts to comment on the new prototype case, which you can do here.

Personally, I think the PC-Q33 looks great and I hope that it comes to fruition as a real product. The hinged front panel is a neat idea and should make it extremely easy to work on the PC. I could definitely see myself using a case like this for my next Mini-ITX build along with a card like the ASUS GTX 760 Direct CU Mini. I’m also interested to see what the modders and water cooling enthusiasts are able to do with the new case!

Cooler Master Shows Off Cosmos SE At GamesCom

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 24, 2013 - 02:17 PM |
Tagged: mid-tower, gamescom, cosmos se, cosmos, cooler master, aluminum

At GamesCom in Germany earlier this week, Cooler Master showed off an updated mid-tower version of its Cosmos S: the Cosmos SE. This new case was on display at the company's GamesCom booth and is an aluminum mid-tower clad in all black. The Cosmos SE shares a similar outward appearance and form factor to the existing (full tower) Cosmos S, except it is shorter and features a redesigned front bezel. The side panel window shape is the same on the two Cosmos S-series cases. The new Cosmos SE does keep the solid aluminum handles and raised legs, however. The front IO is located above the 5.25" bays on the top edge of the case and includes two USB 3.0, two USB 2.0, and two audio jacks.

Internally, the case can accommodate ATX motherboards, three 5.25" drives, and at least five 3.5" or 2.5" hard drives or SSDs. A bottom mounted power supply sits below the motherboard, but with enough room for two dual slot graphics cards.

Cooler Master Cosmos SE Mid-Tower PC Case.jpg

As far as cooling, the Cosmos SE can fit a 240mm radiator on the top of the case and a 360mm radiator with the front hard drive bays removed. Cable management has reportedly been tweaked as well.

The case looks nice but the ability to mount a 360mm rad (even at the cost of removing the 5.25" bays) to the top of the case would have been a welcome feature.

Unfortunately, beyond the photos coming out of GamesCom, details on the new case are scarce. Pricing and availability in particular are still unknown.

Are you excited for the Cosmos SE?

NZXT's H630 is silent but very bright

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 19, 2013 - 01:42 PM |
Tagged: nzxt, H630 Silent, full tower

This case is not the cream colour that once graced the enclosures of computers everywhere but a very bright and clean white.  The default cooling system consists of 200mm fans which help to keep the noise generated by the system at a minimum but you can choose to use 120 or 140mm fans as well as to mount radiators if you choose watercooling.  At 245 x 547 x 567mm (9.6 x 21.5 x 22.3") you will be able to fit the tallest CPU coolers and longest GPUs without issue and the huge number of expansion bays should satisfy storage junkies.  Thanks to the wide variety of toolless installation adapters and living up to the name silent, [H]ard|OCP gave this case a Silver Award; it is worth checking out if you are shopping for a full tower.

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"NZXT leads its H630 charge with the key talking points of, "Clean. Modern. Silent." Surely we think these are thee things that many enthusiast look for when putting together a new system build. Its huge fan support, steel construction, and airflow qualities that are reported to be specifically engineered for silent high performance operation are reviewed here."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Keyboard and Mouse

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | August 14, 2013 - 08:46 PM |
Tagged: windows rt, mouse, microsoft, keyboard

I would normally begin a product announcement with some introduction but, this time, a quote from Mary Jo Foley seems a better fit:

These new peripherals work with Windows 7, Windows 8 and Windows RT, though only "basic functionality" is provided when used with Windows RT.

Problems with Windows RT, it is now obvious, go beyond Ethernet dongles and I would be shocked if Microsoft Hardware are the only ones suffering. We have already heard Plugable, an adapter and peripherals company, complain about Microsoft and their demand for Plugable to pull Surface RT drivers from their website. I cannot see this being a few localized issues.

microsoft_kbmnum_desktop_hero.jpg

These are the problems you will experience with a platform where the owner has complete control. Imagine how bad Windows RT will be if Microsoft slips behind, again, in Internet Explorer development; the only browsers allowed must be Internet Explorer reskins. But I digress.

The Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Desktop is a mouse, keyboard, and number pad with a unique appearance. Non-uniform keys pushing upward to a split should conform to the hand of a typical home row typist. WASD gamers might as well stop reading by this point. Microsoft is not known for mechanical switches so I would expect this keyboard to be typical membrane-based activation.

microsoft_kbmnum_side.jpg

Side-on shows off the depth better.

That said, most Microsoft peripherals I have used tends to keep up with mechanical in terms of durability and performance... except wired Xbox headsets. Those little turds snap within a matter of hours.

The mouse, on the other hand (literally), does not seem to include extra mouse buttons except for a dedicated Windows button. If you have not figured it out by now: gamers are not the target audience. It seems fairly standard otherwise, from a feature standpoint, although comfort and durability are the big deciding factors for many users which we are not in a position to give an honest opinion on.

Together, the devices are available within the week and retail for $129.95. The keyboard, separately, will be available in September for $80.95; the mouse, separately, will be available for $59.95. High price, but it might just be worth it for dedicated typists.

Source: Microsoft

NXZT's HALE90 series of PSUs is getting long in the teeth but still a contender

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 12, 2013 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: modular psu, PSU, NZXT HALE90, kilowatt, 80 Plus Gold

For $230 the NZXT HALE90 v2 1000W PSU needs to perform well to justify the price, especially as the 1200W model currently costs the same amount.  [H]ard|OCP has the tools to test this PSU to the limits and that is exactly what they did; the unit received a passing mark but no award as the quality of it's voltage regulation was right in the middle of the pack, no better nor worse than the competition.  It is a very efficient PSU if that is one of your prerequisites, it is rather attractive and offers a large selection of modular cabling.  Check out the full review for the exact specifications.

H-Hale90_1k.jpg

"The new NZXT HALE90 v2 1000 watt computer power supply has more than a few marketed points that talk it up like; clean currents, rock steady performance, eccentric design, and infused design elements. All that aside, we will put it through our brutal testing suite and find out if it is worth your hard earned cash."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Google TV versus Chromecast; is there a difference?

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Systems | August 9, 2013 - 01:34 PM |
Tagged: asus, asus cube, google, google tv, htpc

With the release of the Google Chromecast streaming USB stick it seems apropos to revisit Google's other foray into the HTPC business, Google TV.  Specifically it is the ASUS Cube up for review at Bjorn3D which will be offered as an example.  At less than 5" a side it is a tiny device with HDMI input and output, an pair of USB 2.0 connectors, an ethernet port and a connector for an IR sensor for the remote.  It does have wireless connectivity to help keep down on the clutter if you install it somewhere noticeable.  Inside you will find a 1.2 GHz Marvell Armada 1500 chip, 1GB of RAM and 2GB of user accessible storage.  There are a variety of apps to help you find streams to watch and is certainly easier to set up than a full HTPC.  At $125 is is more expensive than the Chromecast but it is also more powerful, see how in the review.

Bj3DAsus_Cube_07.jpg

"Asus Cube is the device that features latest Google TV OS that want to be part of your living room entertainment setup. With a good design, an unique remote, and $139 price tag, can it push Google TV further where others may have failed? Let’s find out."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Bjorn3D

CaseLabs shrinks down their modular case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 7, 2013 - 04:19 PM |
Tagged: CaseLabs, Merlin SM8

CaseLabs is not the most common of case manufacturers as their design is very open and modular and perhaps daunting for an inexperienced system builder but perfect for modders and watercoolers.  As you can see there is no drive rack, you install drives as needed directly to the chassis which leaves a lot of space for watercooling or lighting.  The cases dimensions of 22.44" x 11.18" x 22.38" are smaller than their previous families of cases but is still large enough for full ATX motherboards and oversized GPUs.  TechPowerUp installed a system in this case, opting for only a few of the available accessories as the base model is worth almost $400 before you start shopping for optional mounts.

TPU_install1.jpg

"CaseLabs is known for their modular cases because they allow for the most intricate water-cooling setup without compromising on quality. While their cases have been quite large in the past, the Merlin series offers smaller, more traditionally sized enclosures. We take the SM8 for a spin to see how it fares."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: TechPowerUp

Phanteks Enters PC Case Market With Enthoo Primo Full Tower Chassis

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 5, 2013 - 08:02 AM |
Tagged: phanteks, full tower, enthoo primo, eatx

Phanteks, a company known for its CPU coolers, has launched into a new market with a new full tower PC case called the Enthoo Primo. The case measures 650mm x 250mm x 600mm and is constructed from a steel frame and will aluminum panels. It is a full tower case that can accomodate motherboards up to EATX in size. The Enthoo Primo is all black with clean lines, controllable LEDs, and a side panel window.

Phanteks Enthoo Primo Full Tower EATX Case.jpg

The front of the case has a door that swings open to reveal the five 5.25" drive bays and front case IO. The IO includes:

  • 2 x USB 3.0
  • 2 x USB 2.0
  • 2 x Audio jacks

The Enthoo Primo also features a LED switch that can control the case's LEDs and user-added LED fans (or strips), and a PWM fan controller for up to 11 fans. As far as cooling options go, Phanteks bundles five 140mm PH-F140SP fans.

Phanteks Enthoo Primo Full Tower EATX Case_internals.jpg

In all, the Enthoo Primo supports up to 16 total fans or five water cooling radiators. The top and front case panels are removable and come equipped with dust filters. Water cooling radiator support includes:

  • Front: 1 x 240mm
  • Top: 1 x 480mm or 420mm
  • Side: 1 x 240mm without hard drives cages installed
  • Rear: 1 x 140mm or 120mm
  • Bottom: 1 x 240mm or 480mm

Internall features include eight PCI expansion slots, EATX motherboard support (with large CPU cutout), CPU coolers up to 207mm tall, five 5.25" drives, and six 3.5" HDDs or 12 2.5" SSDs. Phanteks has also placed mounting brackets for a water cooling reservoir and pump in the top and bottom of the case respectively. Cable management is enabled by grommets around the motherboard tray, routing space behind the motherboard tray, and two removeable hard drive cages that are covered from the window to present a clean aesthetic.

Phanteks Enthoo Primo Full Tower EATX Case_hard drive cages.jpg

It is a nice looking case for enthusiasts running high end hardware and cooling setups. Phanteks' Enthoo Primo is available now in the UK for £199.99 which works out to about $306 USD. However, according to Maximum PC, the new full tower case will be available in the US in September with an MSRP of $249.99.

Source: Phanteks

Cooler Master Launches CM 690 III ATX PC Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 30, 2013 - 08:26 AM |
Tagged: cooler master, cm 690 III, atx

Cooler Master has announced the CM 690 III, which is a redesigned full tower case in the same enthusiast vein as the original CM 690. Cooler Master has primarily redesigned the interior with a new hard drive mounting cage, tool-less drive bays, and additional cable management space behind the motherboard tray.

40_Product_45_system.jpg

The new Cooler Master CM 690 III measures 507mm x 230mm x 502mm (HxWxD) and weighs approximately 19 lbs (8.7kg). The case is all black with mesh front and top panels. The top of the case has a small storage compartment and front panel IO options including two USB 3.0, two USB 2.0, and two audio jacks. The front of the case has three externally-accessible 5.25” bays and space for a 200mm intake fan.

The CM 690 III comes in two SKUs, depending on whether you want a side panel case window or not. The model with a side window supports up to 7 fans while the model without a window supports up to 9 fans, and up to three 200mm fans. Also, cooling support further includes grommets on the rear of the case for external radiators, support for a 240mm water cooling radiator on both the top and front panel, and a 120mm raditor on the rear. Dust filters are located on the top, front, and PSU vents.

17_Product_45 degree.jpg

The CM 690 III supports graphics cards up to 423mm long and CPU coolers up to 171mm high. Users can install up to 7 3.5” hard drives or up to 10 2.5” SSDs (one behind the motherboard and one on the bottom of the case).

The updated CM 690 III will be available in August for an undisclosed price.

Cheap Cases for Gaming PCs, Rosewill Galaxy (-01, -02, -03)

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | July 28, 2013 - 10:39 PM |
Tagged: rosewill, atx case

Rosewill, no stranger to computer cases, expands their portfolio with three cheap and feature-filled ATX mid-towers. No more than a single external 3.25" bay, and aesthetics, seem to differentiate the models from one another. Every choice has: a healthy number of internal bays, some option for external 3.5", a spot for an SSD, USB 3.0, and an expected price of $50.

rosewill-galaxy-2-3.jpg

Galaxy-02 (top-left) and Galaxy-03 (top-right) allow up to three 5.25" devices to be installed, two if you convert a bay to an external 3.5" slot using the supplied adapter. Galaxy-01 (below) includes a permanently mounted external 3.5" bay. I never really understood the advantage compared to an internal, but still easily accessible, mounting point; a toaster-like dock, attached internally to SATA, would get my attention.

rosewill-galaxy-1.jpg

Each case contains three 120mm fans with options of mounting either a fourth fan, 120mm or 140mm form factors, to the side panel. For those curious, power supplies are mounted on the bottom and draw cool air from a dust-shielded opening.

All three cases are currently available for $49.99.

Source: Rosewill

Argon from SilverStone, inexpensive cooling for three sizes of system

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 22, 2013 - 04:44 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, heatsink, AR02, AR01

SilverStone have released three new Argon branded coolers, the mid-sized AR01, the small AR02 and the extra large AR03, of which [H]ard|OCP reviewed the first two models.  The AR01 is 120mm x 50mm x 159mm and uses three heatpipes to move the heat up to where it can be dispersed by the 120mm fan.  The AR02 is 92mm x 50mm x 134mm which makes it great for smaller systems though the 92mm is an odd size and could be hard to replace if you so desired.  Both coolers are under $35 to pick up, so while not the best performing heatsinks on the market they do very well when you look at the price to performance ratio.  You can see the full review here.

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"SilverStone comes to us today with a new series of air cooler for your AMD or Intel branded processor. The Argon series is pointed squarely at the lower cost end of its product stack. So how do these 6mm heatpipe units with "Direct Export Technology" stand up to testing in a world of great air coolers with much higher prices?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

New Intel PCN Addresses NUC Overheating Issues

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | July 20, 2013 - 03:29 AM |
Tagged: Intel, dccp847dye, nuc, SFF, pcn, wi-fi

Intel recently posted a Product Change Notification (PCN, number 112432-00) regarding one of its first NUC bare-bones systems, model number BOXDCCP847DYE. The PCN seeks to address the overheating issues that several hardware review sites encountered when performing large file copies across the network using the built-in Wi-Fi card. Intel has reportedly found a solution by adding a 9.5mm thermal pad to the underside of the top cover. The thermal pad will make contact with the mSATA SSD and facilitate heat transfer from the drive into the metal chassis.

Intel PNC Upgrade to Bottom NUC cover aids cooling.jpg

The overheating problems spotted by PC Perspective (in our review) and other tech sites lead to system freezes and restarts. When transferring large amounts of data across the network, the built-in mPCI-E Wi-Fi card would heat up, and because the SSD is mounted just above the Wi-Fi card, the system would lock up or crash when the SSD overheated. Thus, Intel’s workaround is to improve the cooling of the SSD such that it (hopefully) will no longer overheat and users will not have to resort to buying a USB Wi-Fi dongle or running an Ethernet cable to the switch.

According to the PCN, the solution works and system retailers should expect shipments of the BOXDCCP847DYE with upgraded cover to arrive as early as August 1st. Notably, Intel is planning to ship out all pre-modification inventory before moving onto shipping updated bare-bones systems. It may be some time before consumers can be sure they are getting the updated model. In the meantime, users can always opt to use one of the many third party NUC cases that take full advantage of passive cooling techniques.

Source: Intel (PDF)

Cooler Master Unveils Massive V8 GTS CPU Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 20, 2013 - 02:03 AM |
Tagged: v8 gts, Intel, hsf, cpu cooler, cooler master, amd

Cooler Master has unveiled a massive CPU cooler called the V8 GTS. The new high end air cooler measures 154 x 140 x 153.5mm and weighs 1.9 pounds. It combines a horizontal vapor chamber, eight heat pipes, triple aluminum fin stacks, and two shrouded PWM fans with red LEDs.

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The V8 GTS is compatible with both Intel and AMD CPU sockets, including LGA 775, 1150 1155, 1156, 1366, and 2011 on the Intel side and AM2, AM3, AM3+, FM1, and FM2 on the AMD side. A horizontal vapor chamber is used for the CPU baseplate to effectively move heat away from the processor an into the heatpipes.

20_Product_V8 GTS_bottom.jpg

Eight 6mm heat pipes further transfer heat to three total aluminum fin stacks. Further, two 140mm PWM-controlled fans move cool air across the fins to facilitate cooling high end and overclocked processors. The fans can spin between 600 and 1,600 RPM and are rated for between approximately 28 and 82 CFM respectively.

14_Product_V8 GTS_side.jpg

Other features of the Cooler Master V8 GTS include red LEDs and a black shroud. The cooler is designed to allow plenty of room for clearance around the RAM area to allow for memory with heatspreaders to be used. It is rated to be able to cool up to 250W. It may be rather heavy and may or may not be a hemi, but it certainly looks cool (heh)!

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The CM V8 GTS is model number RR-V8VC-1GPR-R1 and comes with a 2 year warranty. Cooler Master has not yet detailed pricing or availability. In the meantime, Hardware Secrets managed to get their hands on the massive cooler to put its performance to the test.

Seasonic's high quality 400W PSU, the X-400FL Platinum

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 17, 2013 - 04:48 PM |
Tagged: PSU, seasonic, X-400FL Platinum 400W, 80 Plus Platinum, modular psu

A 400W PSU seems a little under-powered when compared to the kilowatt PSUs that are commonly reviewed but there are not many systems that actually need that amount of power.  Seasonic has designed their X-400FL Platinum 400W to provide great power, efficiency and extra features in lieu of providing huge amounts of power.  The PSU is fully modular and is able to provide an impressive 33A combined from it's four 12V rails, with an absolute minimum of ripple even during the most intense parts of [H]ard|OCP's testingAt $120 it is a little more expensive than other similar PSUs but with the outstanding build quality of the PSU it is worth it.

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"This new Seasonic PSU touts Platinum efficiency, a fully modular design, and a host of other enthusiast-worthy hardware features that will ring true with those looking for a what might be "the best" 400 watt PSU on the market. For those of you looking to build that truly powerful HTPC, this PSU also offers silent operation."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

PCPer Live! Learn about power supplies with Ryan and Lee! Win EVGA PSUs!

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | July 16, 2013 - 08:16 PM |
Tagged: video, PSU, power suppy, pcper live, live

Missed the live stream?  You fool!  But here is the reply of the event and quite honestly it turned out better than I expected.  If you don't learn something about power supplies by watching this, I'll eat my shoe.

Countless readers ask us for advice on power supplies.  What makes power supplies different, how do you calculate how big of a PSU you need, are single rail units the best?  That is just a sample of the inquiries that find their way to us.

After months of scheduling, I was finally able to wrangle in our resident power supply expert, Lee Garbutt, responsible for basically all of the power supply testing on PC Perspective since the beginning, for a LIVE stream to talk all about power supplies!

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Learn about Power Supplies with Ryan and Lee - Live Stream

10am PT / 1pm ET - July 17th

PC Perspective Live! Page

What can you expect to learn during our live stream?  Here is a sample of the topics we are going to cover:

Why are PC power supplies called switchers or switching power supplies?

What qualities characterize a good PSU?

What is Power Factor Correction and is it the same thing as Efficiency?

What’s all the hype about single versus multi rail output? Which is better? And what’s a rail anyway?

Let’s look inside a PSU and show me what the main components are?

Let’s talk about how you test a PSU. What tests do you perform? What equipment do you use, etc.?

We'll be monitoring the chat room in our PC Perspective Live! page for more questions during the stream of course but if you have any pressing issues you want to be sure are addressed, please leave a note in our comments below!  For those of you that CAN join us live, we have another reason to attend...PRIZES!!

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EVGA was kind enough to donate a EVGA SuperNOVA 1000 G2 PSU and a SuperNOVA NEX750G Gold power supply!  What do have to do to enter?  Just be in the live stream and pay attention - we'll have the details there during the LIVE stream!

Again, that's July 17th at 1pm ET / 10am PT for an informative discussion about the power supplies that make all of our PC gaming goodness possible!

EVGA Announces 500B Haswell-Ready Power Supply

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | July 12, 2013 - 04:13 AM |
Tagged: PSU, Intel, haswell, evga, c7, c6, 80 Plus Bronze

EVGA recently launched a new 500W power supply called the 500B. The new ATX PSU is haswell ready and supports the advanced low-wattage C6 and C7 sleep states. The 500B, as the name suggests, is a 500W unit rated 80 PLUS Bronze for 85% efficiency under typical workloads.

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Although it is not modular, it has several other enthusiast friendly features. It supports 40 Amps on the single +12V rail and has over-current and over-voltage protection.  Further, it has two 6+2-pin PCI-E power connectors, a single 8-pin CPU power, and a 24-pin ATX connector along with a couple molex and SATA power for good measure. Also, the PSU fan automatically adjusts speed for low noise.

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The EVGA 500B (model number 100-BR-0500-KR) comes with a 3 year warranty. Pricing and availability have not been announced. It looks to be a decent option for budget builds, and should be priced competitively. More information and additional photos can be found on this EVGA product page.

Source: EVGA