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Subject: Systems
Manufacturer: Dell

The Dell All-in-One

 

Reviewers, at times, can be somewhat myopic.  I speak for myself in this particular instance.  My job as a writer is to test hardware on a daily basis, and as such I have a very keen understanding (or so I hope) of the intricacies of computer design.  If I need to build a machine, whether for test purposes or something that my wife can play Song Pop on, I have a near infinite variety of components that I can choose from to fit the needs of the project.  As such, we often forget that not everyone has that level of expertise.  Most people, in fact, just want to be able to buy something that not only fits their needs, but also simply just has to work.

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Dog is unimpressed with packaging.  UPS complained profusely though.

This is the reason why we have the Dells, HPs, and Lenovos of the world.  The vast majority of people out there are unwilling to build their own machine and support it themselves.  They neither have the time nor patience to dive in and learn the ins and outs of a modern PC and the software that runs them.  This is not a bad thing.  Just as I do not have the patience to learn how to sew, I still like wearing clothes.  At least during our podcasts.  For the most part.

We must also admit that we are moving well away from the typical beige box that dominated the 90s and early 2000s.  Manufacturers have a much better eye for not only functionality, but also aesthetics.  No longer do we have the hulking CRTs of yesteryear, and neither do we have the large boxes that are nearly indistinguishable from one or another.  Multiple form factors abound and these large manufacturers have design teams that pay very close attention to things like compatibility, power consumption, and thermal dissipation.  With these things in mind, they are able to create unique devices that not just serve the needs of consumers, but also just simply work.

Apple has been at the forefront of this type of design for quite some time.  This is a company that has prized fit, finish, and functionality far more than they have pursued cost cutting and homogenization.  This has lead to much higher margins for the company, and a nearly rabid following by the people buying their platforms.  We certainly can argue that they probably perfected the “all-in-one” machine back in the Macintosh days, and since that time they have not stood still.  The iMac was a further advancement in that field, but the introduction of relatively inexpensive and large LCD panels allowed them to further shrink the all-in-one.  It also allowed them to further sculpt the design into what we see today.

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Everything is nicely supported in the box.

Obviously people around the industry have noticed this trend, and noticed the devoted following of the Apple consumers.  It is hard to miss.  The world is a big place though, and surely there are people who crave the type of design that Apple pushes, but do not necessarily want to jump on that particular bandwagon.  Dell has recognized this and created their XPS One lineup of products.  Not everyone wants to run OSX and pay the Apple tax.  If this is the case for a reader, then this might be the product that catches their attention.

Continue reading our review of the new Dell XPS One 27-in PC!!

Dell Reimagines the All-in-One Computer for Consumers

Subject: Systems | May 29, 2012 - 02:46 PM |
Tagged: all-in-one, XPS One 27, xps, Ivy Bridge, Inspiron One 23, Inspiron One 20, inspiron, dell

The quick breakdown of Dell's new lineup is ...

The XPS One 27 all in one PC starts at price of $1,399  has a high end Ivy Bridge i5 or i7 with an optional GT640M, an impressive 27" 2560x1440 display, up to 16GB of DDR3 and ships with up to a 2TB HDD with an optional 32GB SSD for Intel SRT.

The Inspiron One 23 is $749 and will mostly contain mid-range i5s and i3s (an i7 is an option), an optional Radeon HD7650A, a 23" 1080p monitor, up to 8GB of RAM and up to a 2TB HDD, no SSD option on this one though.

Lastly the Inspiron One 20 has a low cost of $529 and will get you running with a SandyBride based Pentium G620T or an Ivy Bridge i3-2120T, the 20" 1600x900 will be powered by Intel's onboard graphics, 6GB of DDR3 and up to a 1TB HDD. 

Read on for the full details

 

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Dell is reimagining the all-in-one computer, with a new portfolio of solutions for consumers who desire beautifully designed systems for multimedia creation and entertainment. The new computers include the XPS One 27, Dell’s largest ever all-in-one and part of the premium XPS performance family, and the Inspiron One 23 and Inspiron One 20 all-in-one computers for families. The three desktop computers are slim and stylish and reflect Dell’s design aesthetic that places a premium on unique materials, form factors and experiences.

XPS One 27: Powerful Simplicity, Powerful Creativity
The XPS One 27 delivers a big-screen experience – from the diagonal to the resolution – with one of the most vibrant displays Dell has offered. The XPS One 27 is 27-inches of stunning 2560x1440 Full Quad HD clarity and color. The wide format 16:9 WLED display makes digital work, movies, games and photos appear crisp, colors vivid. It delivers optional high-performance graphics from NVIDIA and entertainment features such as Waves MaxxAudio 4 and Infinity-branded speakers, an optional slot load Blu-ray disc drive, and optional internal TV tuner, making it an entertainment and multimedia powerhouse.

The gorgeous design extends beyond the all-in-one PC’s vibrant display. The combination of a slim, space-saving metallic silver color housing, “clutter-free” one-cord design, and wireless keyboard and mouse, ensures the XPS One 27 is a beautiful addition from any angle to any room.

On the inside, Dell packs 3rd Generation Intel Quad Core processors with Intel Turbo Boost Technology, balancing quad core processing with efficient power use – even while running multiple programs at once. With an optional mSATA SSD drive and Intel Smart Response Technology, and four USB 3.0 ports, the XPS One 27 delivers a noticeable speed boost on start-up, resume and data transfer.

Inspiron One 23 and Inspiron One 20: Big Value, Minimal Space
Featuring a simple, single cord set-up, the new space-saving Inspiron all-in-one computers make life easy and deliver powerful entertainment for the whole family. The latest Intel processors and optional powerful discrete graphics allow parents and kids to stay connected to each other and to enjoy the things they love, such as music, movies and casual gaming.

A result of direct customer feedback, the Inspiron One 23 now features a new sleek pedestal stand that supports a Full HD 1080p WLED 23-inch display. With an optional Blu-ray disc drive and optional internal TV tuner, as well as ample storage for music, movies and photos, the Inspiron One 23 is an attractive addition to the family living room.

The Inspiron One 20 delivers everyday connectivity and computing in a clean and simple design, making it a smart investment at a competitive price. The all-in-one PC provides a clutter-free work area with full desktop-equivalent performance, allowing customers to stay organized and efficient and keep up with family and friends.

“As part of the reimagining of our entire XPS and Inspiron portfolio, we are likewise reimagining our all-in-ones as stunning systems that are the centerpiece of any room. They deliver a captivating user experience that will inspire our customers to create their best work and consume all the content they love,” said Sam Burd, vice president and general manager of product development for Dell. “The XPS One 27, Inspiron One 23 and Inspiron One 20 deliver phenomenal value and offer our customers compelling choices that meet their unique needs.”

Pricing and Availability: The XPS One 27 (starting at $1,399), Inspiron One 23 (starting at $749) and Inspiron One 20 (starting at $529) all-in-one computers are available today in select countries in Asia and will be available in the United States and additional countries in the coming weeks.

Click for the full list of specs ...

Source: Dell

Hands-on With the Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook

Subject: Mobile | January 11, 2012 - 02:00 PM |
Tagged: xps, ultrabook, dell, CES

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There are many ultrabooks, but not all of them are given a specific introduction by Intel’s CEO, Paul Otellini. That honor was reserved for Dell’s new XPS 13 during Tuesday's Intel keynote. So what’s so special about it?

To find out, we meet with Dell representatives packing not only the new XPS 13 but also a number of competing ultrabooks. One of the main points that Dell made during the Intel keynote was that the XPS 13’s Gorilla Glass display allows for thin bezels, in turn reducing overall display size and allowing for a reduction in the laptop’s dimensions. Though it has a 13” display, it is much smaller than many other thin laptops such as the MacBook Air and the ASUS UX31.

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The use of Gorilla Glass combined with the XPS 13’s machined aluminum lid creates a rigid structure. Some ultrabooks available today have problems with display flex, as Dell demonstrated with a Toshiba Protégé ultrabook they brought along. Another smart decision is the XPS 13’s display hinge, which is nearly as wide as the chassis. A large hinge such as this reduces display wobble, a problem that can occur when typing on some ultrabooks.

The bottom of the XPS 13 is made of carbon fiber covered with soft-touch paint. I asked Dell’s representatives if the entire bottom of the chassis was carbon fiber, something I doubted due to reasons of cost. They insisted that it was. 

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Using carbon fiber of course saves weight, but in this case it isn’t used to provide an ultrabook that is lighter than anything else on the market. At about 3 pounds, the XPS 13 is only on par with the competition. Instead, the weight savings appears to have been re-invested in the use of sturdier materials, such as the wide hinge that I mentioned earlier.

Open the XPS 13 and you’ll be introduced to a black interior coated in soft touch paint identical the bottom of the chassis. The contrast between the interior and the silver aluminum creates a complimentary aesthetic that reminds me of a tuxedo. Using the soft touch paint also gives the laptop a warmer, more inviting feel. I am a little worried that the paint will end up absorbing oils from your hands over time, but it looks and feels great when new. 

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As for the keyboard, well – it’s average. It uses plastic keys with a semi-touch coat in the typical island style, creating the laptop’s least attractive feature. Mind you, key feel is okay and there’s nothing functionally wrong, but I do think flatter keys with a completely matte finish would have been more appropriate. Backlighting is standard and turns on automatically when the webcam detects a low-light environment. Quality was a bit hard to judge during my time with the device because we were in a brightly lit area. 

Touchpad quality struck me as excellent. It’s large and integrates the left/right buttons into the touchpad itself. Materials match the surrounding palmrest in color. I had only a few chances to try multi-touch scrolling, but it seemed to work well.

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Standard equipment includes a Core i5 low-voltage processor and a 128GB solid state drive. As a result, the laptop boots within about 10 seconds and can resume in between 1 and 2 seconds. These are not Dell’s official claims, but rather what I observed personally. Display resolution is the standard 1366x768. I can’t say much about quality as I didn’t have the chance to view test images. 

Dell has included a 47Wh battery in the XPS 13, which should provide up to 9 hours of battery life. This claim is made during testing with WiFi off and should be viewed as a best-case scenario. I anticipate that we’ll see about 6 hours of life during standard usage with WiFi on. If the XPS 13 can manage that, it will be above average for the category. 

Pricing starts at $999, which is less than I expected given the quality of this device. Because ultrabooks all have extremely similar hardware it is traits like design and battery life that will distinguish the winners from the losers. From my brief time with the XPS 13, it seems Dell may have one of the winners. I will be looking to grab a review unit over the next few weeks so the laptop can be tested in full.

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Dell