Stealth Introduces WPC-525F Waterproof PC

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 5, 2012 - 09:57 PM |
Tagged: waterproof, stealth, PC, nettop, Intel, desktop, atom d525

Stealth has debuted a new rugged and waterproof computer called the WPC-525F. The nettop-like system is a ruggedized small form factor PC powered by Intel’s Atom D525 processor and ICH8M chipset. IP67/NEMA 6 rated, the company states that the WPC-525F is dust, rain, and splash resistant as well as, allegedly, being capable of being run over by a pickup truck and continuing to function.

Stealth WPC-525F_1.jpg

If only the tire tread came as a standard silkscreen option...

On the outside, the WPC-525F is a black box with covered ports on the rear, a VESA mount on the bottom, and a power button on the front. Simple enough. Dimensions are 10.15” (W) x 6.22” (D) x 2.04” (H) (258x158x52mm), and it weighs 5.1 pounds without cables. Interestingly, instead of typical ports, it has water resistant “Bayonet” connections with cables that lead away from the back of the PC to the devices. With all the cables connected, you get the following IO options:

4 x USB 2.0
2 x RJ45 LAN (Gigabit Ethernet)
1 x RS232 serial
1 x VGA
1 x Power

It can accept 6 to 36V DC input for power. According to Stealth, the entire system will consume 16W when idle and 19W under full load.

Stealth WPC-525F.jpg

The outside of the Stealth WPC-525F is impressive, but the internals are certainly not as flashy. It features an Intel Atom D525 dual core processor clocked at 1.8GHz (1MB cache), 4GB DDR3 RAM, and a 120GB MLC SSD. The board also includes two internal Mini-PCIe expansion slots. For video, the computer uses the onboard Intel GMA 3150. As implied by the ports listed above, there is no audio support on the WPC-525F, though you could add a USB sound card if it was really needed.

Stealth WPC-525F_2.jpg

The WPC-525F is fanless and uses the aluminum chassis to facilitate cooling. The ruggedized PC is available now with a starting price of $1595 USD. (Keep in mind that that is without an OS or AC power adapter.) You can find more photos and specifications on the product page.

 

Source: FanlessTech
Subject: Storage

ioSafe: Introduction and Internals

Introduction:

Cloud storage is all the talk these days, and our own Tim Verry has been hard at work detailing as much of it as he can keep up with. While all of us at PCPer currently use cloud based solutions for many of the day-to-day goings on, it's not for everyone, and it tends to not be for very large chunks of data, either. Sometimes local storage is just the way to go – especially when you want to be the one in absolute control of the reliability and integrity of your data.

The general rule for proper backups is to have your local copy, a local backup (RAID is *not* a backup), and an additional off-site backup to cover things like theft, fires or floods. So lets say you simply have too much sensitive data for your internet connection to support bulk transferring to an off-side / cloud storage location. Perhaps the cloud storage for that much space is simply cost prohibitive, or your data is sensitive enough that – despite encryption – you don't want it leaving your network and/or premesis? Perhaps you're just stubborn and want only one backup of your data? I think I might have the answer you've been looking for – behold the ioSafe SoloPRO:

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What is this thing, you may ask? On the inside it's one of the available 1, 2, 3, or even 4TB 3.5" hard drives. On the outside it's a very durable and solid steel enclosure. The hard drive is wrapped in a thermally conductive yet water resistant 'HydroSafe' foil that enables water resistance rated at a 10 ft depth for 3 days with no data loss. The bonus, however, is not the water resistance - that featuer is present primarily to battle the side effects of something much more drastic - the ioSafe is fire-proof. That feature comes from what sits between the steel casing and the shrink wrapped hard drive - something ioSafe calls a DataCast (pictured below):

Internals:

I'm going to break from my normal warranty voiding and show a photo from this past Storage Visions conference at the Consumer Electonics Show, where an ioSafe was already cracked open for our viewing pleasure:

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Read on for the full review!