Podcast #312 - Thecus N2560 NAS, ASUS STRIX GTX 780, Flash Media Summit News and more

Subject: General Tech | August 7, 2014 - 10:37 AM |
Tagged: podcast, video, Thecus, n2560, asus, strix, strix 780, flash media summit, Samsung, tlc, vnand, Marvell, gtx 880, x99s sli plus

PC Perspective Podcast #312 - 08/07/2014

Join us this week as we discuss the Thecus N2560 NAS, ASUS STRIX GTX 780, Flash Media Summit News and more!

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Hosts: Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Scott Michaud, and Morry Tietelman

Program length: 1:00:33
 

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FMS 2014: Samsung announces 3D TLC VNAND, Storage Intelligence initiative

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | August 5, 2014 - 01:19 PM |
Tagged: FMS, vnand, tlc, ssd, Samsung, FMS 2014, Flash Memory Summit

Just minutes ago at the Flash Memory Summit, Samsung announced the production of 32-layer TLC VNAND:

DSC03974.JPG

This is the key to production of a soon-to-be-released 850 EVO, which should bring the excellent performance of the 850 Pro, with the reduced cost benefit we saw with the previous generation 840 EVO. Here's what the progression to 3D VNAND looks like:

progression slide.png

3D TLC VNAND will look identical to the right most image in the above slide, but the difference will be that the charge stored has more variability. Given that Samsung's VNAND tech has more volume to store electrons when compared to competing 2D planar flash technology, it's a safe bet that this new TLC will come with higher endurance ratings than those other technologies. There is much more information on Samsung's VNAND technology on page 1 of our 850 Pro review. Be sure to check that out if you haven't already!

Another announcement made was more of an initiative, but a very interesting one at that. SSDs are generally dumb when it comes to coordinating with the host - in that there is virtually no coordination. An SSD has no idea which pieces of files were meant to be grouped together, etc (top half of this slide):

DSC04016.JPG

Stuff comes into the SSD and it puts it where it can based on its best guess as to how it should optimize those writes. What you'd want to have, ideally, is a more intelligent method of coordination between the host system and the SSD (more like the bottom half of the above slide). Samsung has been dabbling in the possibilities here and has seen some demonstrable gains to be made. In a system where they made the host software aware of the SSD flash space, and vice versa, they were able to significantly reduce write latency during high IOPS activity.

DSC04014.JPG

The key is that if the host / host software has more control over where and how data is stored on the SSD, the end result is a much more optimized write pattern, which ultimately boosts overall throughput and IOPS. We are still in the experimentation stage on Storage Intelligence, with more to follow as standards are developed and the industry pushes forward.

It might be a while before we see Storage Intelligence go mainstream, but I'm definitely eager to see 3D TLC VNAND hit the market, and now we know it's coming! More to follow in the coming days as we continue our live coverage of the Flash Memory Summit!

Samsung Launches First V-NAND SSD For Enterprise Market

Subject: Storage | August 14, 2013 - 07:11 AM |
Tagged: Samsung, charge trap flash, vertical nand, vnand, 128Gb, enterprise ssd

Last week, Samsung announced that it had started producing a new stackable NAND flash memory called V-NAND, or vertical NAND. The new 3D V-NAND would initially be available in 128Gb (Gigabit) chips, but could eventually scale into as much as 1 Tb (Terabit) per chip by stacking additional dies vertically. Doing so allows Samsung some flexibility in scaling to higher capacities without going to increasingly expensive and difficult to manufacturer smaller manufacturing processes, which has been the traditional method of attaining denser flash.

The company has now announced the V-NAND SSD, which is its first Solid State Drive to use the Vertical NAND technology. Aimed at the enterprise server market, the V-NAND SSD will come in 480GB and 960GB capacities. The 2.5” form factor drives are 7mm thick and come equipped with a SATA III 6Gbps controller. On the high end, the 960GB model uses 64 MLC 3D V-NAND 128Gb dies for a total physical capacity of 1TB. However, user-accessible capacity will be only 960GB. Unfortunately, Samsung did not reveal how many physical chips the drives use, so its hard to say how those 64 128Gb dies are distributed (4 high in 16 chips or 8 high in 8 chips, etc).

Samsung VNAND Enterprise SSD.jpg

The 960GB Samsung V-NAND SSD spotted by Engadget.

Samsung claims that the V-NAND SSD offers up to 20% increased performance and a 40% reduction in power consumption versus previous SSDs. Further, the 3D NAND using Samsung’s Charge Trap Flash technology is rated at 35K program erase cycles. Samsung rates the V-NAND memory itself as being twice as fast in writes and between two and ten times as reliable versus traditional 19nm floating gate NAND (the alternative to CTF NAND).

Samsung's 128Gb V-NAND die.

Samsung stated in a press release that it started production of the V-NAND SSD earlier this month. While it is introducing V-NAND into enterprise drives first, the technology will eventually trickle down into consumer drives. I’m interested to see this drive benchmarked for performance and write endurance to see if the 3D flash lives up to its potential.

Source: Engadget

Samsung Mass Producing Vertical NAND With Higher Performance and Reliability

Subject: General Tech | August 5, 2013 - 10:56 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, vnand, vertical nand, charge trap flash, 128Gb, nand

Today, Samsung announced that it has begun mass production of a new kind of 3D NAND flash memory that offers up higher reliability and write performance versus traditional 2d “planar” technologies. The so-called VNAND (Vertical NAND) is currently being used in 128Gb (Gigabit) flash chips (matching current 2D flash chips), but the technology has the potential to go much further in terms of capacity.

The VNAND combines an updated version of Samsung’s Charge Trap Flash (CTF) technology (originally developed in 2006) with a vertical stacking and interconnect technology that uses special etching techniques to punch holes and electrical connections down from the top of the highest die to the bottom die.

Samsung VNAND Chip 128Gb.jpg

Samsung claims that its proprietary interconnect technology is (currently) able to support up to 24 layers of flash memory. The resulting VNAND offers up to twice the write performance and between 2-times and 10-times higher reliability versus traditional 19nm floating gate NAND (the alternative to CTF NAND) developed on planar processes.

With traditional NAND flash, as flash density increases (such as the move from 25nm to 19nm NAND flash), inter-cell interference also increases due to thinner walls and increased leakage. Samsung is hoping to solve that problem with its vertically-stacked NAND by allowing density to increase without dealing with shrinking the individual layers. Further, each layer is separated by a dielectric (electric insulator) that is currently 50nm and constructed of Silicon Nitride (SiN). The company notes that there is a limit to the height at which flash can be stacked before it becomes un-economical, but that is still a ways off compared to where NAND flash is now as far as densities seen in the wild.

Samsung’s new 128Gb VNAND chip is expected to scale to at least 1Tb depending on consumer demand. The technology is aimed at both embedded NAND and SSDs, but the former is likely to make use of 3D vertical NAND first. Standard 2.5" SSDs could also benefit but modern SSDs are already bottle-necked by the SATA III 6Gbps bus much less by faster write speed potential. Mobile devices, however, could benefit from faster single-chip VNAND packages immediately with faster write speeds and higher reliability (and potentially, density) versus 2D NAND chips.

It is definitely a technology with potential that is worth keeping an eye on.

The full press release can be found over at Engadget.

Source: Engadget