Verizon ALLSET Pre-Paid Plans Offer Rollover Mobile Data

Subject: Mobile | March 4, 2014 - 01:33 AM |
Tagged: verizon, rollover data, mobile data, data caps, allset

Verizon has taken the wraps off of a new pre-paid cell phone plan called “ALLSET.” The plans offer unlimited calling, unlimited texting, and 500MB of base data for $35/month for feature phones and $45 a month for smartphones. At first glance, they are pretty standard fare, and not the cheapest pre-paid option either. However, Verizon has added a bit of a twist to the pre-paid equation by allowing ALLSET users to add “Bridge Data” on top of the base plan’s 500MB cap that can be rolled over to future months if not used right away.

Verizon AllSet Plans.jpg

The ALLSET plans come with a 500MB (or 1GB if enrolled in Auto Pay) of cellular data each month that cannot be saved. From there, users can purchase up to two data packages that can be saved or rolled over to future months if not used right away. The Bridge Data packs work out to $5 for 500MB, $10 for 1GB, or $20 for 3GB. Users can save the $5 (500MB) pack for a month while the $10 (1GB) and $20 (3GB) packs can be saved or have the remaining bits rolled over for up to three months after purchase. The base data is used first, after which the first package is used completely before dipping into the second package (if purchased at all), which is important to consider in relation to the expiration dates.

In another bit of good news for ALLSET users, Verizon allows the mobile hotspot feature which is extremely rare for the cellphone industry (without charging an additional fee).

The system is not perfect due to the short expiration dates (at most 90 days) for rollover and the fact that base data cannot be saved (only the additional bridge data packs), but it is definitely a step in the right direction and a feature I have been wanting to see for years now. Hopefully this encourages other providers to consider rollover data plans, and the competition forces relaxed restrictions on the expiry of rollover data.

Phone companies branding tablets? What's next; dogs and cats living together ... mass hysteria ...

Subject: Mobile | February 25, 2014 - 07:49 PM |
Tagged: verizon, Ellipsis 7, 4g lte, phablet

Not content with selling phones and hotspots, Verizon combined both into a phablet called the Ellipsis 7 4G LTE tablet.  It features a 1280x800 7" HD IPS display and runs Android 4.2.2 on an quad-core ARM Cortex A7 @ 1.2GHz with 1GB of RAM.  At $120 with a 2 year contract, plus connectivity charges of course, it is not a bad price for an LTE capable tablet and even the $300 price tag without a contract beats the price of many phones on the market.  Of course price is not everything, which is why you should check out Legit Reviews full coverage of the tablet here.

verizon-ellipss-7-7-645x452.jpg

"The Verizon Ellipsis 7 Tablet is a new release from 'The Worlds Most Reliable Network'. The Ellipsis 7 is targeted at those looking for productivity on the go, as well as a touch of entertainment. A 7" tablet is small enough to toss into a jacket pocket or purse, but large enough to use for most tasks without an issue. The Verizon Ellipsis 7 Tablet isn't just a Wi-Fi tablet like many of the tablet out there, the Ellipsis 7 is connected to the Verizon 4G LTE network and has all the benefits that come with it. If you're interested in the Verizon Ellipsis 4G LTE tablet you can pick it up on Amazon.com for as little as $119.99 with a 2 year contract, or $299.99 without a contract. Read on to see how it performs!"

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

Mobile

But who gets the phone number 192.168.0.1?

Subject: General Tech | January 31, 2014 - 02:52 PM |
Tagged: voip, verizon, pots and pans, att

AT&T and Verizon are investigating this newfangled thing called VoIP and if it works as an alternative to switch based telephone systems.  The FCC has decided to allow them to do some limited testing on how the world would change if users were assigned IP addresses as opposed to telephone numbers.  Hopefully at some point they will realize this will have more to do with MAC addresses than static IP addresses but it is nice to know that they will at least do some research into the consequences of dumping switch based physical circuits.  The Inquirer's coverage mentions that the FCC will not regulate this testing which could be a good or bad thing; they are a bit technologically impaired but at the same time Ma Bell has never been good at respecting their customers rights.

photo-chicago-c-t-a-switchboard-operator-merchandise-mart-1957.jpg

"TELECOMS PROVIDERS in the US have been given a green light to explore the idea of replacing traditional telephone communications with Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP)."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Verizon Cloud Powered By AMD Seamicro SM15000 Servers

Subject: General Tech | October 9, 2013 - 01:59 AM |
Tagged: verizon, sm15000, seamicro, enterprise, cloud, amd

Verizon is launching its new public cloud later this year and offering both compute and storage to enterprise customers. The Verizon Cloud Compute and Cloud Storage products will be hosted on AMD SM15000 servers in a multi-rack cluster built by Verizon-owned Terremark.

The new cloud service is powered by AMD SM15000 servers with are 10U units with multiple microservers interconnected by SeaMicro's Freedom Fabric technology. Verizon is aiming the new cloud service at business users, from SMBs to fortune 500 companies. Specifically, Verizon is hoping to entice IT departments to offload internal company applications and services to the Verizon Cloud Compute and Cloud Storage offerings. Using the SeaMicro-built (now owned by AMD) servers, Verizon has a high density, efficient infrastructure that can allegedly provision and deploy virtual machines with fine tuned specifications and performance and reliability backed by enterprise-level SLAs while being compliant with PCI and DoD standards for data security.

Verizon Cloud_SM15000 Servers in Racks.jpg

Verizon will be launching Cloud Compute and Cloud Storage as a public beta in Q4 of this year. Further, the company will be taking on beta customers later this month.

The AMD SM15000 is a high performance, high density server, and is an interesting product for cloud services thanks to the networking interconnects and power efficient compute cards. Verizon and AMD have been working together for the better part of two years on the cloud platform using the servers which were first launched to the public a little more than a year ago.

Verizon Cloud_SM15000 Storage.jpg

The SM15000 is a 10U server that is actually made up of multiple compute cards. AMD and SeaMicro also pack the server with a low latency and high bandwidth networking fabric to connect the servers to each other, multiple power supplies, and the ability to connect to a shared pool of storage that each compute card can access. Each compute card uses a small, cut down motherboard, processor, ram, and networking IO. The processors can be AMD Opteron, Intel Xeon, or Intel Atom with the future possibility of an AMD APU-based server (which is the configuration option that I am most interested in). In this case, Verizon appears to be using AMD Opteron chips, which means each compute card has a single eight core AMD Opteron CPU clocked at up to 2.8GHz, 64GB of system memory, and a 10Gbps networking link.

Verizon Cloud_AMD SM15000 Servers_Cloud Computing.jpg

In total, each SM15000 server is powered by 512 CPU cores, up to 4TB of RAM, ten 1,100W PSUs, and support for more than 5PB of shared storage. Considering Verizon is using multiple racks filled with SM15000 servers, there is a lot of hardware on offer to support a multitude of mission critical applications backed by SLAs (service level agreements, which are basically guarantees of uptime and/or performance).

I'm looking forward to seeing what sorts of things customers end up doing with the Verizon Cloud and how the SeaMicro-built servers hold up once the service is fully ramped up and utilized.

You can find more information on the SM15000 servers in my article on their initial debut. Also, the full press release on the Verizon Cloud is below.

Source: AMD

LG Launches Enact Smartphone With Physical Sliding Keyboard

Subject: General Tech | August 22, 2013 - 06:58 PM |
Tagged: verizon, smartphone, physical keyboard, LG, enact, Android

LG recently launched a new slider smartphone called the Enact on the US Verizon network. The new smartphone pairs low-to-midrange hardware with a physical keyboard and Android 4.1.2 Jelly Bean.

The LG Enact measures 4.37” x 2.06” x 0.62” and weighs 5.99 ounces. A black chassis surrounds a 4” touchscreen display with a resolution of 800 x 400 and front-facing VGA webcam. A physical keyboard slides out from the left side of the phone and a 5MP camera (with auto-focus) is located on the back of the smartphone along with a LED flash. The keyboard’s five row layout includes full qwerty and a top number row along with arrow keys in the bottom-right corner.

LG Enact Verizon Android Smartphone.jpg

Internal specifications include a Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 MSM8930 SoC, 8GB of internal storage, wireless radios, and a 2,460 mAH Li-ion battery. The MSM8930 SoC includes a dual core ARM CPU clocked at 1.2GHz and a Adreno 305 GPU. Wireless functionality includes 802.11n Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 4.0, and GPS. The smartphone runs Android 4.1.2.

The LG Enact has a full retail price of $349.99, and a subsidized price of $19.99 with a 2 year contract through the Verizon website. The smartphone has modest specifications and an older version of Google’s mobile operating system, but it does offer up a physical keyboard and is the latest in an increasingly rare product type.

Source: Verizon

Verizon To Upgrade FIOS To 300Mbps for $204.99 a Month

Subject: General Tech | June 3, 2012 - 04:23 AM |
Tagged: verizon, pricing, Internet, fios, fiber, 300mbps

According to sources that talked with The Verge, Verizon is planning on offering faster internet services for its FIOS customers, but the new tiers are going to cost a pretty penny.

Verizon will be upgrading many of its FIOS internet speeds, and the changes are set to go into effect on June 17th. The base 15/5Mbps (download/upload) plan will cost $10 more than the current price of $54.99 at $64.99 a month. The current 25/25Mbps will be upgraded to 50/25 and will not see a price increase–it will continue to cost $74.99. The current 50/20Mbps plan will see a significant speed bump to 150/65Mbps, and it will cost $94.99 a month (no price increase). A new 75/35 speed plan will become available and it will cost $84.99 a month. Finally, the service that readers will be drooling over–the 300Mbps plan–will feature speeds of 300Mbps downloads and 65Mbps uploads. It will cost a hefty $204.99 a month, a price that The Verge notes is a mere $5 more than the 150/35 speed tier that it replaces.

vz9100emcoax450_8e75.jpg

In typical Comcast telco fashion, Verizon has managed to tack on up to three fees including a $5 per month fee for those without a contract, a $5 fee for those that do not subscribe to FIOS phone service, and a $100 fee to install equipment for those that want the upper two speed tiers. Fortunately (sort of...), users can avoid the $100 fee if they are new customers or already subscribe to the company’s 150Mbps tier. Also on the less-than-stellar news front, Verizon will not be upgrading plans for those on VDSL plans (in buildings where Verizon delivers fiber to the premises and uses copper from there to homes–think older apartment buildings). Even worse, VDSL customers will still be subject to the increased pricing although they cannot take advantage of the upgraded speeds.

$5 fee for those without FIOS phone, $100 fee for top two tier upgrade.
Single Family Home VDSL 1 VDSL 2 2 Year Contract Month-to-Month Rate
3/1 Mbps 3/1 Mbps 3/1 Mbps $54.99 $59.99
15/5 Mbps 10/2 Mbps 15/5 Mbps $64.99 $69.99
50/25 Mbps 20/5 Mbps 20/10 Mbps $74.99 $79.99
75/35 Mbps 30/5 Mbps 50/10 Mbps $84.99 $89.99
150/65 n/a n/a $94.99 $99.99
300/65 n/a n/a $204.99 $309.99

(Source: The Verge. The 150/65 plan doesn't seem like a bad deal actually, if only I had FIOS in my area!)

So this fiber internet upgrade announcement seems great at first does have a dark side. Some customers will be getting a great deal while others will be getting the short end of the stick. Here’s hoping that you are one of the lucky customers on the middle tiers who have FTTH that get a free speed upgrade! More information on the specifics of this upgrade should be coming later this month.

Source: The Verge

Verizon And Coinstar Backing New Subscription Redbox + Streaming Movie Service

Subject: General Tech | February 6, 2012 - 12:27 PM |
Tagged: verizon, subscription service, redbox, movies

Netflix has stood at the top of the hill for quite a while now as the streaming and disc subscription service of choice despite the price hikes and Warner Brothers' stupidity in regards to the 56 day waiting period to get a DVD (although it takes only an hour to pirate...).  They may have a new contender later this year; however, because, Verizon and Coinstar (the company behind Redbox) are teaming up to create a joint venture that will launch a new subscription service offering physical discs through the Redbox kiosks and streaming and download-able movies through Verizon.

verizon_redbox_movies.png

The new joint venture will launch the product portfolio in the second half of 2012, according to Verizon. Further, the joint venture will be a limited liability company with Verizion holding a 65% stake and Coinstar holding a 35% stake.  Neither company was willing to go into details on how much the subscription would cost or how exactly it would work at this time due to "competitive concerns."  They did dole out a few small bits of information about the service, however.  

Verizon's President of Consumer and Mass Business Markets Bob Mudge talked confidently about the new streaming service during a conference call to the press where he talked about putting Verizon's large Fiber to the Home (their FIOS service), DSL, and Wireless 4G LTE networks to work to deliver streaming services "to all consumers across the US" whenever they want and on the devices they want to use. Meanwhile, Coinstar will be using the thousands of Redbox kiosks in malls, grocery stores, Wal-Marts, Walgreens, and gas stations to deliver physical discs to consumers throughout the US. They are planning a single source, multi-platform, national product, and will be releasing more details as they get closer to the launch window.

It is certainly interesting, and the streaming subscription space could really use healthy competition and companies with enough weight to throw around to muscle the studios into entering the 21st century with increased streaming licenses and better contract deals. Redbox has recently revolted against Warner Brothers' 56 day waiting period in favor of obtaining the movies through other means, so the studios are not exactly friendly to renting discs much less streaming rights. Here's hoping that the new joint venture can become profitable and serve as further proof that providing a subscription service is a viable revenue stream to studios while being affordable to consumers. A commenter on another forum suggested that it would be a great idea for Verizon to incorporate the streaming service into its FIOS plans as a value add, which is a move that would certainly spread adoption and give the company a quick influx of users!

Do you think Verizon and Coinstar (Redbox) can take on Netflix?

Source: Verizon
Author:
Subject: Mobile
Manufacturer: Samsung

Introduction, Design and Ergonomics

charge1.jpg

Droid. When the brand launched, this was a name that stood for something. While the iPhone enthralled consumers with a friendly, easy, but ostensibly restrictive experience, Droid retaliated with the motto “Droid Does.” It was all about superior functionality, and in that regard it was a success. Today we’ll be looking at the Droid Charge, a phone coming by way of Samsung. 

The Droid Charge is the second 4G LTE phone to hit Verizon’s network, making it an obvious competitor to the HTC Thunderbolt (along with the recently released LG Revolution). Like the Thunderbolt, the Charge is a member of a breed of single-core flagship phone that is already in the process of becoming extinct. Let’s have a look at what else powers Samsung’s Droid. 

table.png

Many buyers are too quick to dismiss phones based of hardware specs, however – the single core tells us little about the Charge’s performance as a phone. As the first Droid to come from Samsung’s stable, this is actually quite an interesting device. Will the brand remain meaningful on a device from this manufacturer? Or is it being diluted?

Keep reading our review of the Samsung Droid Charge for all the info!!