NVIDIA Announces G-Sync, Variable Refresh Rate Monitor Technology

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 18, 2013 - 07:52 AM |
Tagged: variable refresh rate, refresh rate, nvidia, gsync, geforce, g-sync

UPDATE: I have posted a more in-depth analysis of the new NVIDIA G-Sync technology: NVIDIA G-Sync: Death of the Refres Rate.  Thanks for reading!!

UPDATE 2: ASUS has announced the G-Sync enabled version of the VG248QE will be priced at $399.

During a gaming event being held in Montreal, NVIDIA unveield a new technology for GeForce gamers that the company is hoping will revolutionize the PC and displays.  Called NVIDIA G-Sync, this new feature will combine changes to the graphics driver as well as change to the monitor to alter the way refresh rates and Vsync have worked for decades.

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With standard LCD monitors gamers are forced to choose between a tear-free experience by enabling Vsync or playing a game with the substantial visual anomolies in order to get the best and most efficient frame rates.  G-Sync changes that by allowing a monitor to display refresh rates other than 60 Hz, 120 Hz or 144 Hz, etc. without the horizontal tearing normally associated with turning off Vsync.  Essentially, G-Sync allows a properly equiped monitor to run at a variable refresh rate which will improve the experience of gaming in interesting ways.

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This technology will be available soon on Kepler-based GeForce graphics cards but will require a monitor with support for G-Sync; not just any display will work.  The first launch monitor is a variation on the very popular 144 Hz ASUS VG248QE 1920x1080 display and as we saw with 3D Vision, supporting G-Sync will require licensing and hardware changes.  In fact, NVIDIA claims that the new logic inside the panels controller is NVIDIA's own design - so you can obviously expect this to only function with NVIDIA GPUs. 

DisplayPort is the only input option currently supported. 

It turns out NVIDIA will actually be offering retrofitting kits for current users of the VG248QE at some yet to be disclosed cost.  The first retail sales of G-Sync will ship as a monitor + retrofit kit as production was just a bit behind.

Using a monitor with a variable refresh rates allows the game to display 55 FPS on the panel at 55 Hz without any horizontal tearing.  It can also display 133 FPS at 133 Hz without tearing.  Anything below the 144 Hz maximum refresh rate of this monitor will be running at full speed without the tearing associated with the lack of vertical sync.

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The technology that NVIDIA is showing here is impressive when seen in person; and that is really the only way to understand the difference.  High speed cameras and captures will help but much like 3D Vision was, this is a feature that needs to be seen to be appreciated.  How users will react to that road block will have to be seen. 

Features like G-Sync show the gaming world that without the restrictions of console there is quite a bit of revolutionary steps that can be made to maintain the PC gaming advantage well into the future.  4K displays were a recent example and now NVIDIA G-Sync adds to the list. 

Be sure to stop back at PC Perspective on Monday, November 21st at 2pm ET / 11am PT as we will be joined in-studio by NVIDIA's Tom Petersen to discuss G-Sync, how it was developed and the various ramifications the technology will have in PC gaming.  You'll find it all on our PC Perspective Live! page on Monday but you can sign up for our "live stream mailing list" as well to get notified in advance!

NVIDIA G-Sync Live Stream

11am PT / 2pm ET - October 21st

PC Perspective Live! Page

Source: NVIDIA