Heard of the AMD VISION Engine?

Subject: Graphics Cards, Processors | November 15, 2011 - 02:22 PM |
Tagged: AMD VISION Engine, amd, fusion, APU, steady video

The AMD VISION Engine is the name that AMD is using to describe the new features they are offering for users of their GPUs, APUs and those with both.  One example is the AMD Steady Video feature that Ryan and Ken showed off in July.  That is not all, this encompasses the hybrid Crossfire that exists in Llano laptops with discrete GPUs straight through to support for 30bit colour depth (aka 10bit per channel, 10 bit per pixel) and the GPU accelerated Flash. 

If you are interested in getting more from your APU then head to the AMD VISION site to download their driver package, think of it as a Catalyst with benefits.

AMD VISION Engine.jpg

Source: AMD

Video Perspective: AMD Steady Video Technology on AMD A-Series APUs

Subject: Editorial, Graphics Cards | July 25, 2011 - 11:23 AM |
Tagged: amd, APU, llano, steady video, a8-3850, video

In our continuing coverage of the AMD Llano-based A-Series of APUs we have another short video that discusses and evaluates the performance of AMD's Steady Video technology publicly released to the world with the 11.6 driver revision this month.  Steady Video, as we described it in our initial AMD Llano A8-3850 review is:

Using a heterogeneous computing model AMD's driver will have the ability to stabilize "bouncy" video that is usually associated with consumer cameras and unsteady hands.

Basically, AMD is on the war path to show you that your GPU can be used for more than just gaming and video transcoding.  If the APU and heterogeneous computing is to thrive, unique and useful applications of the GPU cores found in Llano, Trinity and beyond must be realized.  Real-time video filtering and stabilization with Steady Video is such an example and is exclusive to AMD GPUs and APUs.

As you can see there are no benchmarks in that video, no numbers we can really quote or reference to tell you "how much" better the corrected videos are compared to the originals.  The examples we gave you there were NOT filtered or selected because they show off the technology better or worse than any others; instead we used it for what AMD said it should be used for - amateur video taken without tripods, etc.  

And since this feature works not only AMD A-Series APUs but also on recent Radeon GPUs, I encourage you all to give it a shot and let us know what you think in our comments here below - do you find the feature useful and effective?  Would you leave the option enabled full time or just turn on when you encounter a particularly bouncy video?

If you haven't seen our previous Video Perspectives focusing on AMD A-Series of APUs, you can catch them here: