Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Samsung

Introduction

Samsung has certainly been pushing the envelope in the SSD field. For the past two years straight, they have launched class leading storage products, frequently showing outside-the-box thinking. Their 840 PRO series was an impressive MLC performer to say the least, but even more impressive was the 840 EVO, which combined cost-efficient TLC flash with a super-fast SLC cache. The generous SLC area, present on each die and distributed amongst all flash chips within the drive, enabled the EVO to maintain PRO-level performance for the majority of typical consumer (and even power user) usage scenarios. The main win for the EVO was the fact that it could be produced at a much lower cost, and since its release, we've seen the EVO spearheading the push to lower cost SSDs.

All of these innovations might make you wonder what could possibly be next. Today I have that answer:

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If you're going "Hey, they just changed the label from 840 to 850!", well, think again. This SSD might have the same MEX controller as its predecessor, but Samsung has done some significant overhauling of the flash memory itself. Allow me to demonstrate.

Here's standard (2D) flash memory, where the charge is stored on a horizontal plane:

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..and now for 3D:

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The charges (bits) are not stored at the top layer. They are stored within all of those smaller, thinner layers below it. You're still looking at a 2D plane (your display), so here's a better view:

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Read on as we dive even deeper into this awesome new 3D flash technology!

Where in the world is Allyn Malventano?

Subject: Storage | June 30, 2014 - 04:01 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, ssd, Summit, Global

Chicago?

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Tokyo?

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Seeking asylum at some random baggage claim area?

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Guess again. Here's a hint:

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More to follow, boys and girls. Stay tuned!

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: OCZ Storage Solutions

Introduction, Specifications and Packaging

Introduction:

OCZ's RevoDrive series has been around for quite some time. We reviewed the first of the series over four years ago, and they just kept coming after that initial launch

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The full line of (now legacy) Revo / Z-Drive series products.

With the recent acquisition by Toshiba, it was only a matter of time before OCZ revamped the RevoDrive line with their new flash. It just makes sense, as Toshiba can be obtained much more readily (and cheaply) since they are now an in-house source for OCZ. With the Vector 150 and Vertex 460 already driving 19nm Toshiba flash, we now have the RevoDrive 350:

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We suspected they might also count this as an update to the Revo line and not just a flash swap, so with a sample to test, let's see what's what!

Read on for our full review!

Corsair Force Series LX SSDs Now Available in 512GB Capacity

Subject: Storage | June 24, 2014 - 05:19 PM |
Tagged: corsair, Corsair Force Series, 512GB, ssd

They are not quite available yet but Corsair have just added a 512GB model to accompany the $80 128GB and $130 256GB Force Series LX SSDs.  You should expect to see the new larger model at it's MSRP of $260 in the very near future.

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FREMONT, California —June 24, 2014 — Corsair®, a worldwide designer of high-perform­­­­­­ance components to the PC hardware market, today announced the addition of a 512GB model to the recently announced Force Series LX line of solid-state drives (SSD). The new Force Series LX 512GB SSD brings the amazing performance benefits of high-capacity SSDs to a lower price point.

The faster performance and silent operation of solid-state drives have long attracted PC enthusiasts, but high prices may have put off some users from making the switch to this faster storage technology. In response to this, Corsair is bringing these SSD advantages to more budget-friendly price points. The Force Series LX are available in three capacities and price points—128GB for $79.99, 256GB for $129.99, and the 512GB at $259.99.

Powered by a Silicon Motion SSD controller, the Force Series LX SSDs offer fantastic performance up to 10 times faster than that of a conventional spinning-disk hard drive. The 512GB model and its SATA 3 interface delivers file transfer speeds of up to 560MB/sec read and 450MB/sec write which can deliver massive improvements in system performance. Operating system start-up and application load times accelerate to mere seconds, anti-virus scans complete far faster, and navigating your PC’s files feels much more responsive thanks to near-instant access times.

A slim-line 7mm aluminum housing makes it easy to install the Force LX into almost every desktop or notebook PC with a 2.5 inch drive bay – an ideal upgrade to breathe new life into an notebook, ultrabook or PC in need of a boost. Corsair’s bundled SSD Toolbox software utility is also included as a free download, allowing you to easily optimize your SSD’s performance, clone your existing hard drive, or securely erase all data on a drive. TRIM, NCQ and S.M.A.R.T. technologies automatically maintain drive performance for years to come, and Corsair tops off the package with a 3 year warranty and legendary customer service for total peace of mind.

Source: Corsair

Some good news on competition for a change; SSDs may be getting cheaper

Subject: General Tech | June 23, 2014 - 01:38 PM |
Tagged: ssd, kingston, Samsung, Intel, sandisk, rumour

If the information provided to DigiTimes is correct we may be in for a price war between SSD manufacturers.  We have seen price drops in flash memory, especially with the advent of TLC and asynchronous flash which have been heartily approved by most enthusiasts.  However there is a chance that in the coming months competition will start driving prices of SSDs down but may have the opposite impact on other products.  Micron is planning on reducing the amount of memory it sells to other companies in order to ramp up its stock of SSDs and SanDisk has jumped into the market with both feet.  You can also expect to see all the major manufacturers start putting out more M.2 drives as adoption of Intel's Z97 board grows.

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"The SSD industry is heading for fierce price competition as major suppliers, including Micron Technology, Intel, Kingston Technology, SanDisk and Samsung Electronics, are gearing up efforts to outperform others, according to industry sources."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Now on Amazon: 1TB Samsung 840 EVO SSD for $399, ASUS PB287Q 4K for $649

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Storage | June 19, 2014 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, ssd, 840 evo, 1TB, amazon, pb287q, asus, 4k

A couple of really nice Amazon picks hit my email box today and I thought they were worth posting for our readers as well.

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1TB Samsung 840 EVO for $399

First, and clearly the most exciting: the 1TB version of the Samsung 840 EVO SSD is now selling for just $399. That comes in at $0.399/GB, which is actually better than the cost per GB of the Crucial MX100 that launched this month. If you haven't picked up an SSD that is big enough to hold all your games, this is the perfect opportunity!

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ASUS PB287Q 4K 28-in monitor for $649

Also, after our review went up at the end of May, the 4K ASUS PB287Q 28-in monitor is finally up for sale on Amazon for $649 with a shipping date of July 1st. If you think you might be interested in the universe of gaming at 4K, now is a great time to jump in.

Thanks for supporting PC Perspective!

Tech Report's SSD Endurance: The Petabyte Club

Subject: General Tech, Storage | June 17, 2014 - 01:38 AM |
Tagged: ssd, Samsung 840, Samsung, kingston hyper x, kingston, endurance, corsair neutron gtx, corsair

In The Tech Report's ongoing SSD endurance challenge, three SSDs are soldiering forward. We have reached the thousand-terabyte mark, which is at least five times more than any of the survivors are rated for. These survivors: The Corsair Neutron GTX, the Samsung 840 Pro, and the Kingston HyperX 3K. Technically, the HyperX was able to reach 1PB of written data with performing only 716TB of actual writes, due to compression.

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Image Credit: The Tech Report

Of course, each of the drives are less-than prestine. The Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB was slowly decreasing in its "life" attribute since the beginning, claiming to be somewhere between 75% and 80% with a fairly linear decline. If this trend continues, the drive will reach "zero" at around 4-5PB of writes. That said, its read speed has substantially dropped from the time between 900TB and 1000TB of total writes, from 500MB/s to just under 400MB/s. Also, this "life" could drop substantially if the drive encounters reallocated sectors (which this model has apparently yet to do).

The other two drives are a similar, remarkably successful story.

The Kingston HyperX drive is reporting itself to be substantially worse off, within the last 10% of its life. That said, even though it claims to be pining for the fjords, it is still working and has only reported a couple of reallocated sectors, those occurring in the last 100TB of writes.

The Samsung 840 Pro seems to still be going strong, although it had more zero or "a couple" of reallocated sectors -- every hundred terabytes yields about 500 reallocations.

As always, this is just our brief discussion of what The Tech Report found out. Be sure to check out their full article for many more benchmarks, tests, and conclusions.

Source: Tech Report
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Plextor

Introduction, Specifications and Packaging

Introduction:

You might not expect it from who was originally an optical drive company, but Plextor has been cranking out SSDs for a while now. We will be taking a look at the recent wave of releases from Plextor, starting with the M6M:

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This SSD contains the same Marvell 88SS9188 controller seen in the Crucial M550, MX100, and ADATA SP920 SSDs, but with additional firmware tweaks claimed by Plextor.

Let's dive right in. Read on for our full review!

You still haven't bought a Crucial MX100?

Subject: Storage | June 10, 2014 - 07:00 PM |
Tagged: ssd, 16nm, crucial, mx100

For a mere $100 you can pick up the 256GB model or for $200 you can double that to 512GB.  That certainly makes the drives attractive but the performance is there as well, often beating its predecessor the MX500 series.  If reliability is a concern the onboard RAIN feature guards against writes to bad flash, there are onboard capacitors to allow writes to finish in the case of power outages and a 3 year warranty.  Check out the full review at The Tech Report if you need a second opinion after Allyn's review.

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"The Crucial MX100 is the first solid-state drive to use Micron's 16-nm MLC NAND. It's also one of the most affordable SSDs around, with the 256GB version priced at $109.99 and the 512GB at $224.99. We take a closer look at how the two stack up against a range of competitors, and the results might surprise you."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Kingston Sees Sales Growth in PC Hardware

Subject: General Tech, Memory, Storage | June 9, 2014 - 11:08 PM |
Tagged: kingston, ssd, hyperx

Kingston, known primarily for RAM, flash drives, and SSDs, discussed the health of their company. VR-Zone reported on the interview and highlighted the company's sentiments about the PC industry. Long story short, Kingston sees growth in sales of PC gaming hardware -- apparently 20% year-over-year. The company expects that this growth comes primarily from SSD upgrades, either from rotating media or, they claim, replacing years-old, entry-level SSDs with more modern (probably in both speed and size) options.

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Nathan Su, APAC (Asia-Pacific) director of Kingston, believes that "many users" have experienced low-tier SSDs and, it seems, would be willing to invest in the full thing. He does not clarify what he means, whether he is talking about SSD caching, or just a really small (or slow) SSDs from drive generations past.

There is a bit of a concern that SSD prices will continue to fall, with some drives reaching under 40c/GB in recent sales. As a consumer, I (selfishly) hope that prices continue to drop, while still remaining profitably sustainable for the manufacturers. Hopefully Kingston is accounting for this and will continue to see growth at the same time.

Source: VR-Zone