The continuing Tech Report SSD torture test

Subject: Storage | November 4, 2013 - 02:53 PM |
Tagged: ssd, endurance

The Tech Report have hit the 200TB mark on their testing of ~250GB SSDs from Corsair, Intel, Samsung and Kingston and the drives are starting to feel it.  At the 100TB mark Intel and Samsung drives started to lose blocks of storage and at 200TB all but two drives have shown evidence of degradation.  The non-Pro Samsung 840 has suffered the most but its performance is very similar to what it was in the beginning while the Corsair and the Kingston drive receiving only compressed data report themselves in perfect health.  Check out the exact performance deltas in their article.

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"We're in the process of hammering six SSDs with an unrelenting torrent of writes to see what happens as the flash wears out. Today, we check in on the drives after 200TB of writes."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Toshiba hardens their flash storage

Subject: General Tech | November 1, 2013 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: toshiba, ssd

Toshiba made a quick announcement today covering a new line of drives they will be releasing which have much greater endurance than their previous models.  The limited lifespan of flash memory has been a concern for many and this drive should reassure users as it could survive 5 full drive writes per day for 5 years.  As the vast majority of users are unlikely to fully fill a drive 5 times that 5 year estimate is lower than most would see.  The drives will also be relatively speedy, The Register reports 130,000 random 4K read IOPS, 42,000 random write ones and 410 MiB/sec sequential write bandwidth.

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"This SSD is made from Tosh’s 24nm enterprise-class NAND (eNAND) and comes in 100GB, 200GB, 400GB and 800GB capacity points. The 30 drive writes/day stat applies to all models. It means that, for example, the 800GB product can have 43.8PB written to it during its 5-year warranted life."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

OCZ Introduces new 19nm Enterprise SATA III SSDs to Its Popular Deneva 2 Series

Subject: Storage | September 24, 2013 - 03:23 PM |
Tagged: ssd, ocz, enterprise ssd, deneva 2, 19nm

SAN JOSE, CA – September 24, 2013 - OCZ Technology Group, Inc. (Nasdaq:OCZ), a leading provider of high-performance solid-state drives (SSDs) for computing devices and systems, today announced the latest addition to the popular Deneva 2 Series which now utilizes 19 nanometer (nm) NAND flash. The new models are 2.5-inch, 6Gbps SATA III-based Multi-Level Cell (MLC) drives that implement the Deneva 2 SSD Series feature-set and are built around a smaller NAND flash process geometry. This cutting-edge drive solution also features a completely new power architecture that was designed from the ground up to optimize server back plane functionality, providing enhanced management of in-rush current and power fluctuation. The result is an advanced SSD series that delivers superior storage performance, enterprise-class endurance, reliability and quality, and excellent total cost of ownership for customers.

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“Our Deneva 2 has been a popular SSD series among IT professionals not only as an HDD replacement but to dramatically accelerate I/O access of such popular enterprise applications as OnLine Transaction Processing, database warehousing, read intensive data caching and server boot-ups,” said Daryl Lang, SVP of Product Management for OCZ Technology. “By implementing new features and the latest NAND flash process geometry we are able to deliver an optimal balance of I/O performance and cost-efficiency to our customers.”

The new Deneva 2 SSDs continue to utilize the proven and effective LSI SandForce® SF-2281 processor and delivers exceptional performance with 19nm toggle mode NAND flash. The performance specifications support read bandwidth up to 550 MB/s, write bandwidth up to 520 MB/s, random read throughput (4K blocks) over 45,000 input/output operations per second (IOPS), and random write throughput (4K blocks) over 34,000 IOPS. It provides consistent sustained performance over time so that users can achieve faster file transfers, boot-ups and benefit from a more responsive storage experience. With a priority on reliability and flash-optimized enterprise endurance, the new Deneva 2 includes advanced features such as data fail recovery, intelligent block management, wear leveling and robust error correction. Additionally, power consumption has also been lowered in the new models as well.

The new Deneva 2 SSD Series are now available in three models supporting 120GB capacity (Model D2CSTK251M3T-0120), 240GB capacity (Model D2CSTK251M3T-0240) and 480GB capacity (Model D2CSTK251M3T-0480). For more information, visit www.ocz.com/enterprise.

22 Terabytes of hammering on the Anvil

Subject: Storage | September 6, 2013 - 02:25 PM |
Tagged: endurance, ssd, anvils storage utility

The Tech Report have seen some mixed results from their SSD endurance testing using Anvil's Storage Utility.  There has not been any mentionable performance degradation for any of the SSDs they have been testing but Kingston's drives have shown some unpredicted behaviour. The HyperX series displayed speed increases, a slight increase in sequential reads and writes as well as random writes and a large increase in random reads.   Tune in next time when they reach 100TB.

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"We're testing six SSDs to see how many writes they can take before burning out and what happens to performance as the flash degrades. Today, we check in on our subjects after 22TB of writes."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Kingspec Reveals 1TB PCI-E SSD Using Eight RAIDed mSATA SSDs

Subject: Storage | September 4, 2013 - 02:37 AM |
Tagged: ssd, PCIe SSD, msata, LSI, kingspec, jmicron

KingSpec recently started shipping a new PCI-E based SSD that achieves more than 2.5GB/s sequential read performance from multiple mSATA SSDs behind a 6Gbps LSI RAID controller. The KingSpec MC2J677M1T is a full height expansion card with a PCI-E 2.0 x8 interface.

The new KingSpec solid state drive is bootable and uses a 6Gbps LSI RAID controller that connects to eight 6Gbps mSATA slots. The drive comes in 1TB and 2TB total capacities and the eight 6Gbps mSATA slots are occupied by eight 128GB or 256GB mSATA SSDs. Each mSATA SSD is powered by a Jmircon SSD controller, NANYA-manufactured DRAM cache, and Intel MLC NAND flash. Further, the LSI RAID controller is actively cooled by a small fan.

KingSpec MC2J677M1T PCI-E SSD.png

As far as performance goes, the 1TB model is rated at 84,000 IOPS and approximately 2GB/s sequential read and write transfer speeds. The SSD Review received a sample of the new drive and provided some preliminary benchmark results in the form of an ATTO benchmark run. At a queue depth of 4, the KingSpec MC2J677M1T achieved 4K reads of 2567 MB/s and 4K writes of 1613 MB/s.

The 1TB KingSpec PCI-E SSD will be available later this year for between $2,000 and $3,000 USD.

When asked for his thoughts, PC Perspective storage editor Allyn Malventano noted that the eight JMicron-driven mSATA SSDs in RAID is just asking for trouble, and the 4K random IO offered by the drive is actually less than some single drive SATA SSDs on the market. Unfortunately, the LSI RAID controller is “a major bottleneck for SSD-level random access.”

A new way to kill your SSD

Subject: Storage | August 22, 2013 - 03:37 PM |
Tagged: ssd, endurance, anvils storage utility

The Tech Report is currently testing several SSDs to destruction, or at least trying to.  They are using a new tool called Anvil's Storage Utilities which includes a test designed to determine the longevity of the flash storage inside SSDs.  They started with factory fresh SSDs, never having a bit written to them before and are currently writing to every address on those drives with a goal of 22TB to be written before they test the speeds of the drives again.  Will some fare better than others?  Perhaps some will sacrifice capacity to keep their speed up?  Stay tuned, even with SATA 6Gbps it takes a while to write that much data!

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"We all know that flash memory has a limited tolerance for write cycling, but what does that mean for SSD endurance? We're testing six SSDs to failure to find out."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Podcast #265 - XSPC GTX 680 Waterblock, ASUS's DirectCU II Refresh, V-NAND SSDs and more!

Subject: General Tech | August 22, 2013 - 02:54 PM |
Tagged: XSPC, video, V-NAND, ssd, Samsung, podcast, MXC, Intel, gtz 780, gtx 680, DirectCU II, asus, 670 mini

PC Perspective Podcast #265 - 08/22/2013

Join us this week as we discuss the XSPC GTX 680 Waterblock, ASUS's DirectCU II Refresh, V-NAND SSDs and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Program length: 1:17:41

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
    1. Jeremy: Logitech Z506 5.1 Surround Speaker System 75W on sale for Canucks or not quite as good for 'muricans
  4. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  5. Closing/outro

*Due to upload issues on YouTube's side today, the video may take substantially longer than usual to be available

Corsair Launches Force LS Line Of Budget SSDs

Subject: Storage | August 22, 2013 - 01:11 AM |
Tagged: corsair, force ls, ssd, phison, toshiba mlc

Corsair has launched a new line of budget solid state drives (SSDs) under the Force LS branding. The new SSDs come in up to 240GB capacities, and despite being budget drives, still manage to max out the SATA III 6Gbps interface.

The new Force LS SSDs use 19nm Toshiba MLC NAND flash and a Phison SSD controller. Traditionally, Corsair has used LSI SandForce controllers in its Force and Force GT solid state drives. The Force LS line includes 60GB, 120GB, and 240GB SSDs. The drives are 7mm thick 2.5” form factor drives.

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As far as performance, the drives support sequential write speeds of 535 MB/s and sequential read speeds of 555 MB/s. Information on IOPS have not been released, but expect it to be lower than the existing Force drives due to their budget nature.

There is no word on specific availability date(s), but the new Force LS drives will be priced at $70 for the 60GB, $110 for the 120GB, and $200 for the 240GB. At the top end, the drives are approximately 83 cents per Gigabyte ($0.83/GB). All Force LS drives come with three year warranties.

Source: Maximum PC

4k alignment from a free partitioning tool

Subject: Storage | August 12, 2013 - 05:37 PM |
Tagged: ssd, partition, MiniTool Partition Wizard Home Edition, 4k

SSDs and modern OSes no longer use the old 512 byte LBA alignment, or at least they don't need to and in the case of SSDs offer larger disk size and faster performance.  However many people are not aware of 4k alignment nor how to check if their SSD is aligned nor what to do even if they do know it is not aligned.  Hardware.Info put together a short article on the steps to verify if your SSD is aligned as well as covering a free partitioning tool called MiniTool Partition Wizard Home Edition which will help you align your SSD as well as other tasks common to partitioning software.  As with any major changes being made at this low a level, do realize that this could cause data loss, but aligning those sectors is a great IDEMA.

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"When you copy the contents of a hard disk from a PC or laptop to an SSD you have to make sure that the placement of the partitions corresponds to the underlying hardware structure. The same is true for the latest generation of hard disks. Today we'll discuss what this so-called '4k alignment' really means and what you can do in order to prevent a decrease in performance."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Silicon Motion introduces new SM2246EN SATA SSD controller, promises lower power for mobile devices

Subject: Storage | August 12, 2013 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: ssd, silicon motion, sata, controller

You may very well have never heard of Silicon Motion (SMI), a major priducer of flash memory controllers, even if you've followed the SSD industry for a while. This is primarily because the vast majority of their products have been tailored for the devices that folks tend to not crack open during review, namely USB memory sticks, eMMC devices, and SD / CF cards:

silicon motion controller history.png

Creating controllers in those arenas will tend to force a company to do a few things very well:

  • Handle a very limited number of flash channels with the greatest speed possible, due to packaging requirements for very small devices.
  • Operate at the lowest power draw possible as to meet the current draw limits of the host interface.

This has resulted in SMI developing a 6Gb/sec SSD controller, dubbed the SM2246EN, using the above techniques:

SM2246EN Block Diagram.jpg

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The block diagram shows what appears to be a fairly standard 4-channel configuration, though there are fewer steps in the pipeline as compared to SandForce and other controllers, which should help decrease latency and improve efficiency. There is also no compression engine, which means power consumption should be further reduced.

Read on for further details on specs and power consumption, followed by the full press blast.