Intel Haswell-E De-Lidded: Solder Is Its Thermal Interface

Subject: General Tech, Processors | August 24, 2014 - 03:33 AM |
Tagged: Intel, Haswell-E, Ivy Bridge-E, haswell, solder, thermal paste

Sorry for being about a month late to this news. Apparently, someone got their hands on an Intel Core i7-5960X and they wanted to see its eight cores. Removing the lid, they found that it was soldered directly onto the die with an epoxy, rather than coated with a thermal paste. While Haswell-E will still need to contend with the limitations of 22nm, and how difficult it becomes to exceed various clockspeed ceilings, the better ability to dump heat is always welcome.

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Image Credit: OCDrift

While Devil's Canyon (Core i7 4970K) used better thermal paste, the method used with Haswell-E will be event better. I should note that Ivy Bridge-E, released last year, also contained a form of solder under its lid and its overclocking results were still limited. This is not an easy path to ultimate gigahertz. Even so, it is nice that Intel, at least on their enthusiast line, is spending that little bit extra to not introduce artificial barriers.

Source: OCDrift

Battle the bane of bulging caps, bring back life to your monitor

Subject: General Tech | July 29, 2011 - 11:22 AM |
Tagged: lcd, solder, capacitor, DIY

Over at The Tech Report you will find a handy guide on restoring a monitor with busted caps to working condition, for not much money nor effort. A bit effort is all that you need to track down a dead capacitor on the circuit board, identified by the bulge which will be apparent at the top of the cap.  Once you've found it you just need to desolder it and swap in a new one and your once broken monitor will be working again.  Even better, this procedure can resurrect any peice of equipment you have which is suffering from failed capacitors.  If you've never used a soldering iron to fix something, this would be a great place to start.

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"In his latest blog post, our own David Morgan shows how to bring a monitor back from the dead with a simple capacitor transplant."

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