Haswell to Reach 4.5W SDP in Limited Quantities

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Mobile | July 23, 2013 - 06:58 PM |
Tagged: SDP, haswell

Intel has just lowered their lowered thermal expectations for Haswell if, of course, you use SDP as your metric. Scenario Design Point (SDP), as opposed to Thermal Design Power (TDP), describes how much heat dissipation is required for the product at some, usually underclocked, performance target. SDP does not need to affect burst performance, however, as the chip can still up-clock given some extra headroom.

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While we don't know OEM partners, Intel could be green, with HP Envy?

It describes long-term cooling requirements, not instantaneous power draws.

In terms of SDP, Intel expected to ship 6W products based on their 4th generation core architecture. Today, Intel announced a limited stock will dip below that target, capable of just 4.5W in waste heat. OEMs who purchase from this limited binning will be able to include Haswell in even thinner active or passively cooled designs.

Intel has not described exact specifications, partners, or shipping dates.

Source: Intel

Intel is still playing coy when it comes to 7W SDPs

Subject: General Tech | January 15, 2013 - 04:10 PM |
Tagged: Intel, SDP, 7 watt, core i5, 3339Y, Ivy Bridge

One of the biggest controversies coming out of CES 2013 was Intel's redefining of TDP as SDP so that they could rate their new Ivy Bridge processor at 7W.  Scenario Design Power is a measurement of the power consumed in certain specific usage situations, which Intel refuses to disclose the specifics of.  From what The Inquirer found out, there will actually be a spectrum of SDPs which consumers can choose from, though again Intel is not saying much about the specifics of the workloads or of the chips themselves.  You can check out what little we know here, though until we have more details it is hard to decide if this will obfuscate the actual power draws of chips or become a new useful metric in the future.

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"CHIPMAKER Intel remains coy about the precise definition of the workload used to calculate its scenario design power (SDP) metric that it has applied to its Y series Core processors.

Intel quietly introduced the new SDP metric at CES where it revealed a 7W Ivy Bridge chip and received some criticism for relying on a new metric to hit its headline figure. When The INQUIRER asked Intel to define the scenario in which the Core i5 3339Y chip hits the 7W figure, the firm said it was "not prepared to talk about the workload at this time"."

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Source: The Inquirer