Somebody got a dual E5-2600 system

Subject: Processors | March 6, 2012 - 03:54 PM |
Tagged: xeon E5-2600, Sandy Bridge-EP, Romley, Grizzly Pass, Bighorn Peak

Somehow SemiAccurate got their hands on an Intel R2000 Romley system, featuring a pair of E5-2600 running on a S2600GZ 2S board, in a 2U rackmount case.   The performance impressed them as they had to create artificial loads to even try to stress the machine.  That wasn't all that is impressive about this new platform; as it is designed as a server platform energy savings during low usage times is a key factor for administrators.  Romley goes far beyond reducing frequency and power consumption when idle and actually has 16 power savings profiles which offers control far beyond what has been possible previously.  As well there are large benefits to moving the PCIe controller onto the die, which you can read all about at SemiAccurate.

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"To give you an idea on how good it is, SemiAccurate spent the last few weeks testing the Intel R2000 (Bighorn Peak) 2U platform based on the S2600GZ (Grizzly Pass) 2S Romley board, and it quickly became obvious we could not stress it with any real workload, only artificial workloads would make this beast sweat. I could not find a way to stress both the memory subsystem and the CPUs at once. To make matters worse, none of this touched the most important modern bottleneck, the network and I/O. Tests didn’t stress the platform evenly, what used to be system tests became subsystem tests, and were obviously the compute equivalent of makework."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

 

Source: SemiAccurate

Ya Rly. Intel releasing new CPUs for servers

Subject: General Tech, Processors | July 28, 2011 - 06:50 PM |
Tagged: Sandy Bridge-EP, Intel

Since we got back together with Sandy B we have played a few games, made a couple home movies together, and went around travelling. Now that our extended vacation is over Sandy decided it is time to get a job. Sandy B was working part-time as a server and apparently like her job because Intel brought her to a job opening in Jaketown. Intel has apparently released details on their server product, Sandy Bridge-EP “Jaketown” that will debut in Q4, to replace the current server line of up-clocked desktop parts with disabled GPUs.

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NO WAI!!!!!

According to Real World Tech, Intel’s server component will contain up to 8 cores and sport PCI-Express 3.0 and Quick Path Interconnect 1.1. Rumors state that the highest-clocked component will run at up to 3GHz with the lowest estimated to be 2.66GHz. The main components of the CPU will be tied together with a ring bus, although unlike the original Sandy Bridge architecture the Sandy Bridge-EP ring will be bi-directional. Clock rates of the internal ring are not known but the bidirectional nature should decrease travelling distance of data by half on average. The L3 cache size is not known but is designed to be fast and low latency.

Intel looks to be really focusing this SKU down to be very efficient for the kinds of processes that servers require. There is no mention of the Sandy Bridge-EP containing a GPU, for instance, which should leave more options for highly effective x86 performance; at some point the GPU will become more relevant in the server market but Intel does not seem to think that today is that day. Check out the analysis at Real World Tech for more in-depth information.