Sandy Bridge-E Processors: Cooler Sold Separately

Subject: Processors | August 15, 2011 - 10:45 AM |
Tagged: sandy bridge-e, Intel, hsf, cooling

We reported a few days ago that AMD is considering bunding a sealed loop water cooling solution with it's high end FX processors.  In an interesting development, VR-Zone today stated that Intel will not be including any cooler at all with it's Sandy Bridge-E parts.

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Specifically, Intel will not be bundling any processor cooler with its Core i7 Sandy Bridge-E 3820, 3930, or 3960X CPUs.  These processors are rated at a 130 watt TDP; however, VR-Zone reports that the processors may in fact be drawing as much as 180 watts at stock speeds.  This massive jump in power compared to previous models, if true, would make Intel's move to not include a cooler a good thing, as enthusiasts will almost certainly want a quality third part air cooler at least, and a proper water loop if any overclocking is involved.  Enthusiasts especially have always opted to use an aftermarket cooler instead of the included Intel one as they have been notoriously noisy and mediocre in the performance department.  While they are decent for stock speeds, overclockers have always demanded more than the Intel coolers could provide.

The situation is made all the more interested when paired against AMD's announcement; Intel has opted to not include any heatsink at all while AMD has opted to ratchet up the cooling performance with a sealed water loop.  Personally, I find the two companies' reactions- because they are almost direct opposite solutions- very intersting and telling about the company mindset.  Which solution do you like more, would you like the chip makers to ratchet up their stock cooling performance, or do you prefer the hands-off approach where they allow you to grab the cooler of your choice by not bundling anything in the processor box?  Let us know in the comments!

Image Credit: Tim Verry.  Used With Permission.

Source: VR-Zone

Ivy Bridge and X79, it might not be great news but now you know

Subject: General Tech | August 1, 2011 - 01:53 PM |
Tagged: Ivy Bridge, x79, Waimea Bay, sandy bridge-e

It almost seems as if AMD is the only company managing to keep up to their schedules, though you could argue that they don't have a CEO cracking the whip and pushing forward release dates.  First NVIDIA's GPU woes and now thanks to VR-Zone we know that the X79 Waimea Bay chipset won't be made available until November, which significantly reduces the chances of it being under your Christmas Tree.  It should get them to major manufacturers in time for them to consider the platform when they release their 2012 lineup, but as system builders we can only hope that someone pushes out a product as quickly as possible, so we can pick it up and spend January dealing with the inevitable bugs you get from pushing something out early.

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But wait, that's not all ... how does an Ivy Bridge processor locked at a 100MHz base clock strike you?  It seems that is what Intel is planning on releasing with both Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge-E, with a less than useful exception.  Both chip architectures will be theoretically overclockable, but not in the single MHz steps that we have become used to.  Instead Ivy Bridge will offer you the ability to jump from 100MHz to 133MHz, no stops in between.  Sandy Bridge-E will offer higher stops but again it will limit you to only those frequency jumps, something the overclocking community is not going to appreciate. 

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"We don't like to be the bringers of bad news, but it's come to our attention that Intel has decided to change its high-end consumer Waimea Bay platform one more time before it launches. The only good news is that we've managed to pin-point which month the platform is expected to launch and that is November and there are several reasons behind this choice."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: VR-Zone

Intel Sandy Bridge-E Processors Just In Time For Christmas But With Some Features Removed

Subject: Processors | July 16, 2011 - 12:54 AM |
Tagged: sandy bridge-e, processor, Intel, cpu

It seems as though intl is running into a slew of snags as they attempt to push out their Sandy Bridge-E processors and their accompanying X79 chipset motherboards. While it was previously thought that the Sandy Bridge-E processors would not be available until at least Janruary 2012, VR-Zone is reporting that the CPUs may actually be out in time for Christmas this year; however, they will have a reduced feature set. The X79 chipset that powers the Sandy Bridge-E processors will also be released with a reduced feature set. While Intel may reintroduce the removed features in later iterations of the silicon, the first run components will have PCI-Express 3.0 and four SATA/SAS 6Gbps ports removed.  Further, Intel is waiting an extra CPU revision until it begins shipping the procesors out to board partners for their testing; the C-1 stepping instead of the C-0.

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In the case of PCI-E 3.0 support, Intel has had trouble testing their engineering silicon with PCI-E 3.0 cards and is not confident enough to integrate it into their production chips at this time. due to the lack of widely available PCI-E 3.0 add-in cards, support for the standard is not that large of a loss in the short twrm but will certainly affect the component's future proofing value. The removal of the SATA ports is due to issues with storage that have yet to be detailed.

While new technology is always welcome, one cant help but feel that delaying the new processors and motherboards until the silicon is ready (and containing the planned features) may be better for consumers. The board and investors likely do not agree, however. In any case, Sandy Bridge-E and X79 are coming, it is just a question of how they come.

Source: VR-Zone