Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Our Legacys Influence

We are often creatures of habit.  Change is hard. And often times legacy systems that have been in place for a very long time can shift and determine the angle at which we attack new problems.  This happens in the world of computer technology but also outside the walls of silicon and the results can be dangerous inefficiencies that threaten to limit our advancement in those areas.  Often our need to adapt new technologies to existing infrastructure can be blamed for stagnant development. 

Take the development of the phone as an example.  The pulse based phone system and the rotary dial slowed the implementation of touch dial phones and forced manufacturers to include switches to select between pulse and tone based dialing options on phones for decades. 

Perhaps a more substantial example is that of the railroad system that has based the track gauge (width between the rails) on the transportation methods that existed before the birth of Christ.  Horse drawn carriages pulled by two horses had an axle gap of 4 feet 8 inches in the 1800s and thus the first railroads in the US were built with a track gauge of 4 feet 8 inches.  Today, the standard rail track gauge remains 4 feet 8 inches despite the fact that a wider gauge would allow for more stability of larger cargo loads and allow for higher speed vehicles.  But the cost of updating the existing infrastructure around the world would be so cost prohibitive that it is likely we will remain with that outdated standard.

railroad.jpg

What does this have to do with PC hardware and why am I giving you an abbreviated history lesson?  There are clearly some examples of legacy infrastructure limiting our advancement in hardware development.  Solid state drives are held back by the current SATA based storage interface though we are seeing movements to faster interconnects like PCI Express to alleviate this.  Some compute tasks are limited by the “infrastructure” of standard x86 processor cores and the move to GPU compute has changed the direction of these workloads dramatically.

There is another area of technology that could be improved if we could just move past an existing way of doing things.  Displays.

Continue reading our story on NVIDIA G-Sync Variable Refresh Rate Technology!!