AMD is the new King of Crimson

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 24, 2015 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: radeon software, radeon, low frame rate compensation, freesync, frame pacing, crimson, AMD VISION Engine

In case you thought we missed something in our discussion of the new AMD Crimson software you can check out what some of the other websites thought of the new release.  The Tech Report is a good first stop, they used the Fable Legends DX 12 to test the improvements to frametime which will be of interest to those who do not obsess over DX 9 games and their performance.  They also delve a bit more into the interface so you can see what the new screens will look at as well as learning the path that will take you to a familiar settings screen.  Check out their impressions right here.

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"AMD's Radeon Software Crimson Edition is the second in a line of major annual graphics driver updates from the company. Crimson also replaces the Catalyst Control Center software with a faster, more refined utility called Radeon Settings. We dug in to see what Crimson has to offer."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

FreeSync and Frame Pacing Get a Boost

Make sure you catch today's live stream we are hosting with AMD to discuss much more about the new Radeon Software Crimson driver. We are giving away four Radeon graphics cards as well!! Find all the information right here.

Earlier this month AMD announced plans to end the life of the Catalyst Control Center application for control of your Radeon GPU, introducing a new brand simply called Radeon Software. The first iteration of this software, Crimson, is being released today and includes some impressive user experience changes that are really worth seeing and, well, experiencing.

Users will no doubt lament the age of the previous Catalyst Control Center; it was slow, clunky and difficult to navigate around. Radeon Software Crimson changes all of this with a new UI, a new backend that allows it to start up almost instantly, as well as a handful of new features that might be a surprise to some of our readers. Here's a quick rundown of what stands out to me:

  • Opens in less than a second in my testing
  • Completely redesigned and modern user interface
  • Faster display initialization
  • New clean install utility (separate download)
  • Per-game Overdrive (overclocking) settings
  • LiquidVR integration
  • FreeSync improvements at low frame rates
  • FreeSync planned for HDMI (though not implemented yet)
  • Frame pacing support in DX9 titles
  • New custom resolution support
  • Desktop-based Virtual Super Resolution
  • Directional scaling for 2K to 4K upscaling (Fiji GPUs only)
  • Shader cache (precompiled) to reduce compiling-induced frame time variance
  • Non-specific DX12 improvements
  • Flip queue size optimizations (frame buffer length) for specific games
  • Wider target range for Frame Rate Target Control

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That's quite a list of new features, some of which will be more popular than others, but it looks like there should be something for everyone to love about the new Crimson software package from AMD.

For this story today I wanted to focus on two of the above features that have long been a sticking point for me, and see how well AMD has fixed them with the first release of Radeon Software.

FreeSync: Low Frame Rate Compensation

I might be slightly biased, but I don't think anyone has done a more thorough job of explaining and diving into the differences between AMD FreeSync and NVIDIA G-Sync than the team at PC Perspective. Since day one of the G-Sync variable refresh release we have been following the changes and capabilities of these competing features and writing about what really separates them from a technological point of view, not just pricing and perceived experiences. 

Continue reading our overview of new features in AMD Radeon Software Crimson!!

AMD Plans Two GPUs in 2016

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 16, 2015 - 09:34 PM |
Tagged: amd, radeon, GCN

Late last week, Forbes published an editorial by Patrick Moorhead, who spoke with Raja Koduri about AMD's future in the GPU industry. Patrick was a Corporate Vice President at AMD until late 2011. He then created Moor Insights and Strategy, which provides industry analysis. He regularly publishes editorials to Forbes and CIO. Raja Koduri is the head of the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD.

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I'm going to be focusing on a brief mention a little more than half-way through, though. According to the editorial, Raja stated that AMD will release two new GPUs in 2016. “He promised two brand new GPUs in 2016, which are hopefully going to both be 14nm/16nm FinFET from GlobalFoundries or TSMC and will help make Advanced Micro Devices more power and die size competitive.”

We have been expecting AMD's Artic Islands to arrive at some point in 2016, which will compete with NVIDIA's Pascal architecture at the high end. AMD's product stack has been relatively stale for a while, with most of the innovation occurring at the top end and pushing the previous top-end down a bit. Two new GPU architectures almost definitely mean that a second one will focus on the lower end of the market, making more compelling products on smaller processes to be more power efficient, cheaper per unit, and include newer features.

Add the recent report of the Antigua architecture, which I assume is in addition to AMD's two architecture announcement, and AMD's product stack could look much less familiar next year.

Source: Forbes

Putting the R9 Nano under the microscope

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 13, 2015 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: radeon, r9 nano, amd

We are not the only ones investigating usage scenarios for AMD's tiny R9 Nano, [H]ard|OCP has also recently looked at this card to determine if or when there is a good reason to pay the extra price for this tiny GPU.  This particular review focuses on performance against a similarly sized Gigabyte GTX 970 in a Cooler Master Elite 110, there will be a follow up in which the cards will run inside a Corsair Obsidian Series 250D case.  At 1080p the cards performed at very similar levels with the significantly more expensive Nano holding a small lead while at 1440p the R9 Nano truly shines.  This card is certainly not for everyone and both the FuryX and GTX 980 Ti offer much better performance at a simliar price point but neither of them will fit inside the case of someone determined to build a tiny gaming machine.

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"This evaluation will compare the new retail purchased Radeon R9 Nano with a GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 970 N970-IX-OC small form factor video card in a mini-ITX Cooler Master Elite 110 Intel Skylake system build. We will find out if the higher priced Nano is worth the money for a 1440p and 1080p gameplay experience in a tiny footprint. "

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

Four High Powered Mini ITX Systems

Thanks to Sebastian for helping me out with some of the editorial for this piece and to Ken for doing the installation and testing on the system builds! -Ryan

Update (1/23/16): Now that that AMD Radeon R9 Nano is priced at just $499, it becomes an even better solution for these builds, dropping prices by $150 each.

While some might wonder where the new Radeon R9 Nano fits in a market that offers the AMD Fury X for the same price, the Nano is a product that defines a new category in the PC enthusiast community. It is a full-scale GPU on an impossibly small 6-inch PCB, containing the same core as the larger liquid-cooled Fury X, but requiring 100 watts less power than Fury X and cooled by a single-fan dual-slot air cooler.

The R9 Nano design screams compatibility. It has the ability to fit into virtually any enclosure (including many of the smallest mini-ITX designs), as long as the case supports a dual-slot (full height) GPU. The total board length of 6 inches is shorter than a mini-ITX motherboard, which is 6.7 inches square! Truly, the Nano has the potential to change everything when it comes to selecting a small form-factor (SFF) enclosure.

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Typically, a gaming-friendly enclosure would need at minimum a ~270 mm GPU clearance, as a standard 10.5-inch reference GPU translates into 266.7 mm in length. Even very small mini-ITX enclosures have had to position components specifically to allow for these longer cards – if they wanted to be marketed as compatible with a full-size GPU solution, of course. Now with the R9 Nano, smaller and more powerful than any previous ITX-specific graphics card to date, one of the first questions we had was a pretty basic one: what enclosure should we put this R9 Nano into?

With no shortage of enclosures at our disposal to try out a build with this new card, we quickly discovered that many of them shared a design choice: room for a full-length GPU. So, what’s the advantage of the Nano’s incredibly compact size? It must be pointed out that larger (and faster) Fury X has the same MSRP, and at 7.5 inches the Fury X will fit comfortably in cases that have spacing for the necessary radiator.

Finding a Case for Nano

While even some of the tiniest mini-ITX enclosures (EVGA Hadron, NCASE M1, etc.) offer support for a 10.5-in GPU, there are several compact mini-ITX cases that don’t support a full-length graphics card due to their small footprint. While by no means a complete list, here are some of the options out there (note: there are many more mini-ITX cases that don’t support a full-height or dual-slot expansion card at all, such as slim HTPC enclosures):

Manufacturer Model Price
Cooler Master Elite 110 $47.99, Amazon.com
Cooltek Coolcube  
Lian Li PC-O5 $377, Amazon.com
Lian Li PC-Q01 $59.99, Newegg.com
Lian Li PC-Q03 $74.99, Newegg.com
Lian Li PC-Q07 $71.98, Amazon.com
Lian Li PC-Q21  
Lian Li PC-Q26  
Lian Li PC-Q27  
Lian Li PC-Q30 $139.99, Newegg.com
Lian Li PC-Q33 $134.99, Newegg.com
Raijintek Metis $59.99, Newegg.com
Rosewill Legacy V3 Plus-B $59.99, Newegg.com

The list is dominated by Lian Li, who offers a number of cube-like mini-ITX enclosures that would ordinarily be out of the question for a gaming rig, unless one of the few ITX-specific cards were chosen for the build. Many other fine enclosure makers (Antec, BitFenix, Corsair, Fractal Design, SilverStone, etc.) offer mini-ITX enclosures that support full-length GPUs, as this has pretty much become a requirement for an enthusiast PC case.

Continue our look at building Mini ITX systems with the AMD Radeon R9 Nano!!

AMD Cancels Catalyst, Introduces Radeon Software Crimson

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 2, 2015 - 08:00 AM |
Tagged: radeon software, radeon, driver, crimson, catalyst, amd

For as long as I can remember, the AMD (previously ATI) graphics driver was know as Catalyst. The Catalyst Control Center (CCC) offered some impressive features, grew over time with the Radeon hardware but it had more than its share of issues. It was slow, it was ugly and using it was kind of awful. And today we mourn the passing of Catalyst but welcome the birth of "Radeon Software" and the first iteration if it, Crimson.

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Starting with the next major driver release from AMD you'll see a major change the speed, design and usability of the most important interface between AMD and its users. I want to be clear today: we haven't had a chance to actually use the software yet, so all of the screenshots and performance claims are from an AMD presentation to the media last week. 

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Let's start with new branding: gone is the AMD Catalyst name, replaced by "Radeon Software" as the overarching title for the software and driver packages that AMD releases. The term "Crimson Edition" refers to the major revision of the software and will likely be a portion of the brand that changes with the year or with important architectural changes. Finally, the numeric part of the branding will look familiar and represents the year and month of release: "15.11" equates to 2015, November release.

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With the new brand comes an entire new design that AMD says targets simplicity, ease of use and speed. The currently available Catalyst Control Center software is none of those so it is great news for consumers that AMD has decided to address it. This is one of AMD's Radeon Technology Group SVP Raja Koduri's pet projects - and it's a great start to a leadership program that should spell positive momentum for the Radeon brand.

While the Catalyst Control Center was written in the aging and bloated .Net coding ecosystem, Radeon Software is designed on QT. The first and most immediate advantage will be startup speed. AMD says that Radeon Software will open in 0.6 seconds compared to 8.0 seconds for Catalyst on a modestly configured system. 

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The style and interface look to be drastically improved with well defined sections along the top and settings organized in a way that makes them easy to find and address by the user. Your video settings are all in a single spot, the display configuration is on its as well, just as they were with Catalyst, but the look and feel is completely different. Without hands on time its difficult to say for sure, but it appears that AMD has made major strides. 

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There are some new interesting capabilities as well, starting with per-game settings available in Game Manager. This is not a duplication of what GeForce Experience does in terms of adjust in-game settings, but it does allow you to set control panel-specific settings like anti-aliasing, texture filtering quality, vertical sync. This capability was around in the previous versions of Catalyst but it was hard to utilize.

Overdrive, the AMD-integrated GPU overclocking portion of Radeon Software, gets a new feature as well: per-game overclocking settings. That's right - you will now be able to set game-specific overclocking settings for your GPU that will allow you to turn up the power for GTA V while turning things down for lower power consumption and noise while catching up on new DLC for Rocket League. I can see this being an incredibly useful feature for gamers willing to take the time to customize their systems.

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There are obviously more changes for Radeon Software and the first iteration of it known as Crimson, including improved Eyefinity configuration, automatic driver downloads and much more, and we look forward to playing around with the improved software package in the next few weeks. For AMD, this shows a renewed commitment to Radeon and PC gaming. With its declining market share against the powerful NVIDIA GeForce brand, AMD needs these types of changes.

Report: AMD Radeon 400 Series Taped Out, Coming 2016

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 23, 2015 - 01:49 AM |
Tagged: tape out, rumor, report, Radeon 400 Series, radeon, graphics card, gpu, Ellesmere, Baffin, amd

Details are almost nonexistent, but a new report claims that AMD has reached tape out for an upcoming Radeon 400 series of graphics cards, which could be the true successor to the R9 200-series after the rebranded 3xx cards.

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Image credit: WCCFtech

According to the report:

"AMD has reportedly taped out two of its next-gen GPUs, with "Ellesmere" and "Baffin" both taping out - and both part of the upcoming Radeon 400 series of video cards."

I wish there was more here to report, but if this is accurate we should start to hear some details about these new cards fairly soon. The important thing is that AMD is working on the new performance mainstream cards so soon after releasing what was largely a simple rebrand accross much of the 300-series GPUs this year.

Source: WCCFTech

AMD Releases Catalyst 15.10 Beta Drivers

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 14, 2015 - 11:24 AM |
Tagged: radeon, dx12, DirectX 12, Catalyst 15.10 beta, catalyst, ashes of the singularity, amd

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The AMD Catalyst 15.9 beta driver was released just two weeks ago, and already AMD is ready with a new version. 15.10 is available now and offers several bug fixes, though the point of emphasis is DX12 performance improvements to the Ashes of the Singularity benchmark.

From AMD:

Highlights of AMD Catalyst 15.10 Beta Windows Driver

Performance Optimizations:

  • Ashes of the Singularity - DirectX 12 Quality and Performance optimizations

Resolved Issues:

  • Video playback of MPEG2 video fails with a playback error/error code message
  • A TDR error or crash is experienced when running the Unreal Engine 4 DirectX benchmark
  • Star Wars: Battlefront is able to use high performance graphics when launched on mobile devices with switchable graphics
  • Intermittent playback issues with Cyberlink PowerDVD when connecting to a 3D display with an HDMI cable
  • Ashes of the Singularity - A 'Driver has stopped responding' error may be experienced in DirectX 12 mode
  • Driver installation may halt on some configurations
  • A TDR error may be experienced while toggling between minimized and maximized mode while viewing 4K YouTube content

Known Issues:

  • Ashes of the Singularity may crash on some AMD 300 series GPUs
  • Core clock fluctuations may be experienced when FreeSync and FRTC are both enabled on some AMD CrossFire systems
  • Ashes of the Singularity may fail to launch on some GPUs with 2GB Video Memory. AMD continues to work with Stardock to resolve the issue. In the meantime, deleting the game config file helps resolve the issue
  • The secondary display adapter is missing in the Device Manager and the AMD Catalyst Control Center after installing the driver on a Microsoft Windows 8.1 system
  • Elite: Dangerous - poor performance may be experienced in SuperCruise mode
  • A black screen may be encountered on bootup on Windows 10 systems. The system will ultimately continue to the Windows login screen

The driver is available now from AMD's Catalyst beta download page.

Source: AMD

Report: AMD's Dual-GPU Fiji XT Card Might Be Coming Soon

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 5, 2015 - 02:33 AM |
Tagged: rumor, report, radeon, graphics cards, Gemini, fury x, fiji xt, dual-GPU, amd

The AMD R9 Fury X, Fury, and Nano have all been released, but a dual-GPU Fiji XT card could be on the way soon according to a new report.

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Back in June at AMD's E3 event we were shown Project Quantum, AMD's concept for a powerful dual-GPU system in a very small form-factor. It was speculated that the system was actually housing an unreleased dual-GPU graphic card, which would have made sense given the very small size of the system (and mini-ITX motherboard therein). Now a report from WCCFtech is pointing to a manifest that just might be a shipment of this new dual-GPU card, and the code-name is Gemini.

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"Gemini is the code-name AMD has previously used in the past for dual GPU variants and surprisingly, the manifest also contains another phrase: ‘Tobermory’. Now this could simply be a reference to the port that the card shipped from...or it could be the actual codename of the card, with Gemini just being the class itself."

The manifest also indicates a Cooler Master cooler for the card, the maker of the liquid cooling solution for the Fury X. As the Fury X has had its share of criticism for pump whine issues it would be interesting to see how a dual-GPU cooling solution would fare in that department, though we could be seeing an entirely new generation of the pump as well. Of course speculation on an unreleased product like this could be incorrect, and verifiable hard details aren't available yet. Still, of the dual-GPU card is based on a pair of full Fiji XT cores the specs could be very impressive to say the least:

  • Core: Fiji XT x2
  • Stream Processors: 8192
  • GCN Compute Units: 128
  • ROPs: 128
  • TMUs: 512
  • Memory: 8 GB (4GB per GPU)
  • Memory Interface: 4096-bit x2
  • Memory Bandwidth: 1024 GB/s

In addition to the specifics above the report also discussed the possibility of 17.2 TFLOPS of performance based on 2x the performance of Fury X, which would make the Gemini product one of the most powerful single-card GPU solutions in the world. The card seems close enough to the final stage that we should expect to hear something official soon, but for now it's fun to speculate - unless of course the speculation concerns a high initial retail price, and unfortunately something at or above $1000 is quite likely. We shall see.

Source: WCCFtech

The Fable of the uncontroversial benchmark

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 24, 2015 - 02:53 PM |
Tagged: radeon, nvidia, lionhead, geforce, fable legends, fable, dx12, benchmark, amd

By now you should have memorized Ryan's review of Fable's DirectX 12 performance on a variety of cards and hopefully tried out our new interactive IFU charts.  You can't always cover every card, as those who were brave enough to look at the CSV file Ryan provided might have come to realize.  That's why it is worth peeking at The Tech Report's review after reading through ours.  They have included an MSI R9 285 and XFX R9 390 as well as an MSI GTX 970, which may be cards you are interested in seeing.  They also spend some time looking at CPU scaling and the effect that has on AMD and NVIDIA's performance.  Check it out here.

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"Fable Legends is one of the first games to make use of DirectX 12, and it produces some truly sumptuous visuals. Here's a look at how Legends performs on the latest graphics cards."

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