Podcast #243 - ASUS Crosshair V Formula-Z, MSI Z77A-G45 Thunderbolt, 2TB SSDs and more!

Subject: General Tech | March 21, 2013 - 02:54 PM |
Tagged: z77a-g45 thunderbolt, video, tegra, quadro, podcast, GTX 690, GTC 2013, DDR3-3000, Crosshair V Formula Z, 2tb ssd

PC Perspective Podcast #243 - 03/21/2013

Join us this week as we discuss the ASUS Crosshair V Formula-Z, MSI Z77A-G45 Thunderbolt, 2TB SSDs and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom, Allyn Malventano, Morry Teitelman, and sometimes Ken Addison

This Podcast is brought to you by MSI!

Program length: 1:18:24

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  1. News items of interest:
  2. Closing:
    1. 1:09:50 Hardware / Software Pick of the Week
      1. Morry: Memory, always more memory - G.Skill Sniper 1866 16GB DDR3
  3. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com

 

Turn half your GTX 690 into a Quadro or Tesla?

Subject: General Tech | March 18, 2013 - 02:23 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, hack, GTX 690, K5000, K10, quadro, tesla, linux

It will take a bit of work with a soldering iron but Hack a Day has posted an article covering how to mod one of the GPUs on a GTX690 into thinking it is either a Quadro K5000 or Tesla K10.  More people will need to apply this mod and test it to confirm that the performance of the GPU actually does match or at least compare to the professional level graphics but the ID string is definitely changed to match one of those two much more expensive GPUs.  They also believe that a similar mod could be applied to the new TITAN graphics card as it is electronically similar to the GTX690.   Of course, if things go bad during the modification you could kill a $1000 card so do be careful.

eevblog_quatro.png

"If hardware manufacturers want to keep their firmware crippling a secret, perhaps they shouldn’t mess with Linux users? We figure if you’re using Linux you’re quite a bit more likely than the average Windows user to crack something open and see what’s hidden inside. And so we get to the story of how [Gnif] figured out that the NVIDIA GTX690 can be hacked to perform like the Quadro K5000. The thing is, the latter costs nearly $800 more than the former!"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hack a Day

Podcast #242 - AMD's new Richland APUs, Steam Box Prototypes, Seagate Hybrid Drives and more!

Subject: General Tech | March 14, 2013 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: Strider, steambox, steam, sshd, Silverstone, Seagate, Richland, quadro 6000, quadro, podcast, hybrid, APU, amd

PC Perspective Podcast #242 - 03/14/2013

Join us this week as we discuss AMD's new Richland APUs, Steam Box Prototypes, Seagate Hybrid Drives and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath and Allyn Malventano

This Podcast is brought to you by MSI!

Program length: 0:59:45

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Reviews:
    1. 0:01:30 Silverstone Strider Power supply
    2. 0:03:00 Richland Unveiled: AMD releases new A10-5750M
  2. 0:14:33 This Podcast is brought to you by MSI!
  3. News items of interest:
    1. 0:15:35 Steam Box Prototypes in the next few months
    2. 0:24:00 NVIDIA allegedly part Quadro 6000 GK110 card
    3. 0:25:30 Seagate SSHD Lineup
    4. 0:30:00 WebM now official with Google and support from MPEG LA
    5. 0:33:40 GF Actually Shipping 28 nm Product!
  4. Closing:
    1. 0:42:40 Hardware / Software Pick of the Week
      1. Ryan: Tranquil PC Intel NUC case
      2. Josh: Cheap and Pretty!
      3. Allyn: Automatic
      4. Morry: Edimax 150mbps wireless nano USB adapter
  1. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  2. http://pcper.com/podcast
  3. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  4. Closing/outro

Be sure to subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube channel!!

 

NVIDIA Allegedly Launching Quadro K6000 GK110 GPU For Professionals

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 8, 2013 - 09:17 AM |
Tagged: quadro, nvidia, kepler, k6000, gk110

Earlier this week, NVIDIA updated its Quadro line of workstation cards with new GPUs with GK104 “Kepler” cores. The updated line introduced four new Kepler cards, but the Quadro 6000 successor was notably absent from the NVIDIA announcement. If rumors hold true, professionals may get access to a K6000 Quadro card after all, and one that is powered by GK110 as well.

GK110 Block Diagram.jpg

According to rumors around the Internet, NVIDIA has reserved its top-end Quadro slot for a GK110-based graphics card. Dubbed the K6000 (and in line with the existing Kepler Quadro cards), the high-end workstation card will feature 13 SMX units, 2,496 CUDA cores, 192 Texture Manipulation Units, 40 Raster Operations Pipeline units, and a 320-bit memory bus. The K6000 card will likely have 5GB of GDDR5 memory, like its Tesla K20 counterpart. Interestingly, this Quadro K6000 graphics card has one less SMX unit than NVIDIA’s Tesla K20X and even NVIDIA’s consumer-grade GTX Titan GPU. A comparison between the rumored K6000 card, the Quadro K5000 (GK104), and other existing GK110 cards is available in the table below. Also, note that the (rumored) K6000 specs put it more in like with the Tesla K20 than the K20X, but as it is the flagship Quadro card I felt it was still fair to compare it to the flagship Telsa and GeForce cards.

  Quadro K6000 Tesla K20X GTX Titan GK110 Full   (Not available yet) Quadro K5000
SMX Units 13 14 14 15 8
CUDA Cores 2,496 2,688 2,688 2,880 1536
TMUs 192 224 224 256 128
ROPs 40 48 48 48 32
Memory Bus 320-bit 384-bit 384-bit 384-bit 256-bit
DP TFLOPS ~1.17 TFLOPS 1.31 TFLOPS 1.31 TFLOPS ~1.4 TFLOPS .09 TFLOPS
Core GK110 GK110 GK110 GK110 GK104

The Quadro cards are in an odd situation when it comes to double precision floating point performance. The Quadro K5000 which uses GK104 brings an abysmal 90 GFLOPS of double precision. The rumored GK110-powered Quadro K6000 brings double precision performance up to approximately 1 TFLOPS, which is quite the jump and shows that GK104 really was cut down to focus on gaming performance! Further, the card that the K6000 is replacing in name, the Quadro 6000 (no prefixed K), is based on NVIDIA’s previous-generation Fermi architecture and offers .5152 TFLOPS (515.2 GFLOPS) of double precision performance. On the plus side, users can expect around 3.5 TFLOPS of single precision horsepower, which is a substantial upgrade over Quadro 6000's 1.03 TFLOPS of single precision floating point. For comparison, the GK104-based Quadro K5000 offers 2.1 TFLOPS of single precision. Although it's no full GK110, it looks to be the Quadro card to beat for the intended usage.

nvidia-quadro-k5000 GPU.jpg

Of course, Quadro is more about stable drivers, beefy memory, and single precision than double precision, but it would be nice to see the expensive Quadro workstation cards have the ability to pull double duty, as it were. NVIDIA’s Tesla line is where DP floating point is key. It is just a rather wide gap between the two lineups that the K6000 somewhat closes, fortunately. I would have really liked to see the K6000 have at least 14 SMX units, to match consumer Titan and the Tesla K20X, but rumors are not looking positive in that regard. Professionals should expect to see quite the premium with the K6000 versus the Titan, despite the hardware differences. It will likely be sold for around $3,000.

No word on availability, but the card will likely be released soon in order to complete the Kepler Quadro lineup update. 

NVIDIA Refreshes Quadro with Kepler

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | March 6, 2013 - 08:02 PM |
Tagged: quadro, nvidia

KeplerQuadroTop.png

Be polite, be efficient, have a plan to Kepler every card that you meet.

The professional graphics market is not designed for gamers although that should have been fairly clear. These GPUs are designed to effectively handle complex video, 3D, and high resolution display environments found in certain specialized workspaces.

This is the class of cards which allow a 3D animator to edit their creations with stereoscopic 3D glasses, for instance.

NVIDIA's branding will remain consistent with the scheme developed for the prior generation. Previously, if you were in the market for a Fermi-based Quadro solution, you would have the choice between: the Quadro 600, the 2000, the 4000, the 5000, and the 6000. Now that the world revolves around Kepler... heh heh heh... each entry has been prefixed with a K with the exception of the highest-end 6000 card. These entries are therefore:

  • Quadro K600, 192 CUDA Cores, 1GB, $199 MSRP
  • Quadro K2000, 384 CUDA Cores, 2GB, $599 MSRP
  • Quadro K4000, 768 CUDA Cores, 3GB, $1,269 MSRP
  • Quadro K5000, 1536 CUDA Cores, 4GB + ECC, $2,249 MSRP

This product line is demonstrated graphically by the NVIDIA slide below.

KeplerQuadro.png

Clicking the image while viewing the article will enlargen it.

It should be noted that each of the above products have been developed on the series of GK10X architectures and not the more computationally-intensive GK110 products. As the above slide alludes: while these Quadro cards are designed to handle the graphically-intensive applications, they are designed to be paired with GK110-based Tesla K20 cards to offload the GPGPU muscle.

Should you need the extra GPGPU performance, particularly when it comes to double precision mathematics, those cards can be found online for somewhere in the ballpark of $3,300 and $3,500.

The new Quadro products were available starting yesterday, March 5th, from “leading OEM and Channel Partners.”

Source: NVIDIA
Author:
Subject: Systems
Manufacturer: HP

A Workstation All-in-One

While consumers know HP for its substantial market share in the world of desktops and notebooks, perhaps more important to HP's bottom line is the company's server and workstation business.  While we all know what servers do there might be some confusion about what a workstation is and what it does.

Workstations are usually defined as computers used by content creators and despite that fact that you burned that DVD of your family vacation, that's not quite the same.  Brands like Xeon, Quadro, FirePro and Opteron are what you will find different in a workstation class computer versus a standard computer or laptop.  And while technology enthusiasts will debate the actual differences between these components, the fact is that the market demands them.

Today we are taking a quick look at the HP Z1 Workstation, a unique workstation in that it resides in the shell of an all-in-one computer.  But not just your normal AIO - this is a 27-in 2560x1400 display with a chassis that opens up for easy access to components inside. 

01.jpg

Once we show you how the processor, SSD, Quadro graphics and everything else works inside I think you will see the appeal of this kind of system even for professionals that require the stability and software support of a workstation class device. Check out our Video Perspective below and then continue on for some more photos and benchmark results from the HP Z1 Workstation!

02.jpg

The side profile shows the HP Z1 is slim enough but still holds a lot of hardware.

03.jpg

You'll find two USB 3.0 ports, Firewire, audio connections and a card reader near the bottom.

04.jpg

The power button, activity lights and eject button live up top.

Continue reading our article on the HP Z1 Workstaion All-in-One PC!!

NVIDIA Launches Maximus 2.0, Combining Kepler and Tesla

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | August 10, 2012 - 05:34 AM |
Tagged: tesla, quadro, nvidia, maximus, kepler, gk110

At SIGGRAPH 2012 NVIDIA announced a refresh of its Maximus workstation platform technology. Maximus is a technology aimed at professionals that work with simulations or content creation and editing. The updated platform features a Tesla K20 accelerator card as well as a Kepler-based NVIDIA Quadro K5000 graphics card. The K5000 in particular has 4GB of GDDR5 memory on a 256-bit bus and 1536 CUDA cores. NVIDIA states that the Quadro graphics card has 2.1 Teraflops of single precision compute power and draws 122 watts.

The K20 on the other hand features a GK110 Kepler GPU with Dynamic Parallelism and Hyper Q features that reportedly enable more than 1 Teraflop of peak double precision performance. Unfortunately, we do not know much more than that on the new K20 Tesla card as the exact specifications are still listed as “to be announced.” It is slated for a Q4 2012 release.

displaymedia.jpg

The Quadro K5000 workstation GPU

Beyond the hardware itself, the company’s Maximus platform has received software support from several high-profile software companies and system integrators. Some of the companies that certify and support Maximus are Adobe, Autodesk, Mathworks, and Paradigm among others. Dell, Fujitsu, HP, Lenovo, and Supermicro are OEMs that support the hardware and manufacture Maximus-powered workstations.

NVIDIA Tesla K20 GK110 GPU.jpg

The Tesla K20 accelerator card.

The second-generation Maximus technology will be available in desktop workstations as early as December 2012. Further, the NVIDIA Quadro K5000 will be available for purchase as a separate discrete card in October 2012 for $2,249 (MSRP). The Tesla K20 will (for now) only be available integrated in a workstation, but NVIDIA lists the MSRP at $3,199.

More information on the NVIDIA Maximus refresh can be found in the company’s press release.

displaymedia (1).jpg

Source: NVIDIA

What's up at the GTC? Check out this BOXX!

Subject: General Tech | May 14, 2012 - 03:31 PM |
Tagged: tesla, quadro, nvidia, maximus, GTC 2012, BOXX

There are many professional level products to be seen at this years GPU Technology Conference, one of the more impressive being NVIDIA Maximus technology. That takes the power of a Quadro and couples it with the new Tesla GPUs for impressive live rendering and CAD applications.  These products are not for gamers more for game designers and graphical artists, but the technology its self is still something to keep your eyes on. 

maximus_bnr.jpg

One of the vendors you will see is BOXX, with several different lines of computers are designed to 3ds Max, CATIA V6 Live Rendering, SolidWorks and other professional level HPC applications.  With a NVIDIA Quadro 6000 6 GB, a Tesla 2075 6 GB and a 240GB SSD for cache and programs you will be rendering like never before.

Ryan will be at the GTC so keep an eye on the page for news from that show when it begins in the middle of this week.  NVIDIA's Maximus technology is sure to feature in some of these stories but do keep in mind this is the GTC and not the GDC so new game previews are unlikely though new benchmark software and proof of concept game engines might be.

gdcBOXX.png

"3DBOXX workstations featuring NVIDIA Maximus technology combine the visualization and interactive design capability of NVIDIA Quadro GPUs with the high-performance computing power of NVIDIA Tesla C2075 GPUs into a single system."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: BOXX

NVIDIA Outlines Multi-GPU and Cloud Graphics With Project Maximus and Virtual Graphics Technologies

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 9, 2011 - 05:08 PM |
Tagged: virtual graphics, tesla, quadro, project maximus, nvidia

It's that time of year again, SIGGRAPH is upon us. The same graphics showcase that brings oohs and ahhs over the latest in ray tracing generated graphics each year has seen NVIDIA bring multi-GPU, scalable Tesla computing power and professional graphics for mobile devices delivered using the Internet at SIGGRAPH 2011. The multi-GPU and cloud based graphics technologies have been dubbed Project Maximus and Virtual Graphics respectively.

nvidia-siggraph-20111091.jpg

According to Engadget, Project Maximus sees NVIDIA opting to recommend a lower end Quadro card and combining it with an almost infinitely scalable Tesla powered cluster. The light Quadro card would handle all of the graphics duties in displaying the desktop and applications' output while the attached Tesla processors would be responsible for handling all of the underlying computationally intensive calculations. This option will be especially interesting for businesses and professional designers as they will be able to allocate to each user only the power they need to get the job done, and future upgrade-ability would improve by allowing more Tesla processors to be added as opposed to a whole graphics system overhaul. Engadget quoted NVIDIA in further clarifying that in some programs, "better performance is achieved by adding a Tesla companion processor, as opposed to scaling up the primary Quadro graphics. Users still require as much graphics as possible."

Virtual Graphics on the other hand is NVIDIA's technology preview that aims to bring quality graphics to numerous devices so long as they have a solid internet connection. Much like onlive is able to stream games to low end computers, NVIDIA's virtual graphics technology seems to be pushing professional level graphics to mobile devices by using graphics card clusters based in the cloud to deliver much more graphical prowess than the mobile SoC (System on a Chip) graphics processors can provide alone. Branching off from Virtual Graphics technology is Project Monterrey, which is an initiative to bring NVIDIA Quadro level graphics on an application agnostic basis to any device capable of maintaining a solid internet connection.

Adobe and Autodesk have already signed on as software partners, and HP will be delivering a three GPU workstation later this year.  More photos of the NVIDIA presentation are available over at Engadget.

Source: Engadget