G.SKILL Achieves World's Fastest Quad Channel Memory Speed at DDR3 4072MHz

Subject: General Tech | September 18, 2013 - 09:31 AM |
Tagged: gskill, ddr3, quad channel

Taipei, Taiwan – 18 September 2013 – No limit is too high for G.SKILL memory. In just a week after the official release of the new Intel Ivy Bridge-E Core i7 Extreme processors, G.SKILL memory is already testing the extreme limits of the Intel processors and broke the world record for fastest DDR3 yet again. This time a 16GB (4x4GB) G.SKILL TridentX memory kit is overclocked to a blistering DD3 4072MHz - the first instance of a quad-channel DDR3 memory kit to break the 4GHz barrier!

trix2.jpg

This astounding feat was made possible and achieved on the new Intel i7-4960X CPU and the ASUS Rampage IV Black Edition motherboard under LN2 extreme cooling.

rampage-4-black-edition-gskill f3-3000c12q-16gtxdg--2_cr_resize.jpg

Below is a screenshot of the record validation by CPU-Z

GSKILL 4072MHz Record 20130918 CPUZ.png

Source: G.SKILL

Go 4x4ing with Corsair HyperX and an X79 motherboard

Subject: Memory | September 20, 2012 - 04:39 PM |
Tagged: ddr3-2133, kingston, HyperX Genesis, quad channel

$100 even will get you 16GB of DDR3-2133MHz Kingston HyperX Genesis quad channel memory, perfect for an X79 based system.  These particular DIMMs are 11-12-11-49 and 1T, at their full speed with a second 1866MHz XMP with slightly tighter timings.  Legit Reviews paired this kit with an Intel Core i7 3820 and ASUS P9X79 Deluxe and while they couldn't get much of an overclock out of these DIMMs, a top speed of 2.2GHz with no luck tightening timings, the RAM Disk testing they did revealed some fantastic performance.

LR_main.jpg

"The 16GB quad-channel kit of 2133MHz HyperX Genesis memory from Kingston Technology is a memory kit that is more than capable of handling any number of large memory usage computer programs, while also providing the speed of 2133MHz to ensure that our programs work quickly, and effortlessly. And having the ability of pushing this memory even farther to 2200MHz will ensure that overclockers will have some room to play..."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

16GB of 1600MHz quad channel DDR3 from Mushkin

Subject: Memory | June 22, 2012 - 01:39 PM |
Tagged: Mushkin, Redline PC3-12800, ridgeback, quad channel, ddr3-1600

While raw speed can be helpful for your memory subsystem, often times tighter timings can have a more noticeable impact, which is what makes Mushkin's Enhanced Redline Ridgeback 16GB kit worth the small premium they charge. It might have a base frequency of 1600MHz but with timings of 7-7-7-24 it has some of the lowest timings we've seen from DDR3.  It also allows you more overclocking choices and when Hi Tech Legion loosened the timings to 8-8-8-24 at a frequency of 1969MHz they saw comparable real world performance to their alternative overclock which left the timings untouched and the frequency at 1702MHz.  If you are looking for quad channel or high capacity dual channel memory this kit is worth investigating.

HTL_redline1.jpg

"The Mushkin Redline PC3-12800 (994057) 16GB Quad Pack Memory Kit is no different. The Redline 994057 Quad Kit offers the best performance on the market. The 994057 comes with industry leading 7-7-7-24 timings on a 16GB quad channel kit. Along with the fast timings, the 994057 uses high performance Mushkin Ridgeback heatsinks for the best possible cooling. The Redline Quad kit runs at 1.65v and comes with Mushkin's lifetime warranty. All Mushkin memory is hand tested for ultimate quality assurance."

 

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Full speed ahead! 8GB of 2400MHz quad channel madness

Subject: Memory | April 10, 2012 - 02:55 PM |
Tagged: kingston, 2400MHz, quad channel, xmp

Kingston's new quad channel 8GB kit is advertised to run at 2400MHz via XMP, which should mean that as long as your motherboard supports that speed you should be able to set that speed in your BIOS, no tweaking needed.  Bjorn3D tried it out and it worked with no problems at all, though no matter what they tried when manually overclocking the DIMMs, they could not surpass the 2.4GHz mark.  That is certainly a point in Kingston's favour but there is also one major problem with these DIMMs and that would be price.  At the price of $208.00 that Bjorn3D found these chips for sale at you could pick up 16GB of 2133MHz RAM from Corsair and have enough change left in your pocket for dinner.

b3d_Kquad.jpg

"Today we take a look at an 8GB high performance memory offering from Kingston. These modules run at a blazing fast speed of 2400MHz while offering full stability in quad channel."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: Bjorn3D

16GB of bright red DDR3-2133MHz from Mushkin

Subject: Memory | February 3, 2012 - 01:22 PM |
Tagged: ddr3-2133, Mushkin, redline, quad channel

How does 16GB of DDR3-2133 @ 9-11-10-28 strike you that looks like candy?  If you are running an LGA2011 system with quad-channel memory 16GB will benefit you in some scenarios and who wouldn't like to brag that their desktop has more RAM than many servers.  The striking red heatspreaders will attract those who like to show off the interior of their case and the performance surpassed the Corsair kit they tested against.  OC3D does want to remind you that while quad channel RAM is fun, it doesn't offer huge advantages over dual channel RAM in real world testing.

 

18172402365l.JPG

"With the recent LGA2011 supporting Quad Channel Memory, the manufacturers are swift to take up the challenge. Cue the Mushkin Redline."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: Overclock3D

A four way Quad Channel DIMM battle

Subject: Memory | January 19, 2012 - 09:23 AM |
Tagged: ddr3, quad channel, patriot, corsair, G.Skill, Mushkin

With the arrival of the X79 chipset we received two gifts, quad channel memory and 2133MHz DIMMs which are much easier to get to full speed.  Overclockers Club took kits from four vendors, Patriot, Corsair, G.Skill and Mushkin.  There is quite a variety of DIMMs, ranging from 1600MHz to 2400MHz at default as well as sporting a variety of timings, though all but one kit are 4x4GB.  There were some challenges when overclocking the kits and OC describes the methods they need to employ to get the most out of these DIMMs.  When the testing was done it became apparent that each of these kits was a winner, except perhaps in cost.

OC_veng.jpg

"The last G.Skill memory I looked at did quite well in the overclocking department and thankfully, this kit does not deviate from that path – the base speed of 2133 MHz was just the starting point for the kit. Making the jump to 2400 MHz, though, required some tweaking of the primary latencies and voltages. CAS latency was bumped to 10 with the tRCD bumped to 12 and the voltage to 1.67 V. The memory controller voltage was fine at 1.05 V with this configuration as seen by the long term (well, 7 hours at least) stability testing of the overclock. The higher speed, coupled with a decent CPU overclock, showed measurable performance gains in testing. The overclocking margin or headroom came in at 13+% or 281 MHz for the time spent tweaking the modules for maximum clocks without killing every day performance. This kit from G.Skill reached the highest overclocked speed in comparison to the other modules in this testing session."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Looking to build an X79 system? Maybe G.Skill has the right stuff for your DIMM slots

Subject: Memory | January 5, 2012 - 08:49 AM |
Tagged: G.Skill, Ripjaws Z, ddr3-2133, quad channel

The arrival of the X79 chipset and quad-channel memory support has made a lot of memory manufacturers very happy.  Over the past year the DDR3 market has been a little slow with very little performance difference between vendors and for that matter memory frequency.  That has left companies struggling to stand out in the crowd and attract buyers to their products.  Now most companies have switched into high gear and are producing new quad-channel kits with some fairly impressive speeds.  Take the G.Skill Ripjaws Z 2133Mhz kit that Bjorn3D just reviewed, sporting timings of 9-11-10-28 @ 1T.  The benchmarking software they used just loved the kit as did the reviewer, who voiced only one concern about the possibility of the height of the DIMMs interfering with a large LGA2011 heatsink.

b3d_gskill2133.jpg

"Today we have in our hands one of G.SKILL's newest lines in the Ripjaws series: the Ripjaws Z which are designed for the quad channel memory controller in the newly released Intel X79 based boards. This kit is not their top model in terms of performance, but boasting a frequency of 2133 with a CAS latency of 9 is in no terms bad either. These are more of the upper high end for a 16GB kit, as G.SKILL does offer some models with slightly better timings or higher speeds, but those also can be much more expensive."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: Bjorn3D
Author:
Subject: Memory
Manufacturer: GSkill

Memory? Why?

Aaah memory.  It has been some time since we last had a memory review, and for good reason.  Memory got pretty boring.  Ten years ago this was not the case.  DDR was just fresh on the scene and we were starting to see memory speeds and bandwidths get to a place where it would have a significant effect on performance.  Latencies were of utmost importance, and the fastest 2.2.2.6 DIMMs running at DDR 400 speeds were often quite expensive.  Then things sort of mellowed out.  DDR-2 did not exactly bring faster performance over DDR initially, and it was not until DDR-2 800 and 1066 speeds that we actually saw a significant boost over previous gen DDR 1.  DDR-3 brought even more yawns.  With the jump to integrated memory controllers from both AMD and Intel, DDR-3 speeds were nearly meaningless.

gskill_001.jpg

The primary reason for this rather vanilla time in the memory market was that of individual bandwidth needs for CPU cores.  Most research into this issue points to an individual CPU core needing only 3 to 4 GB/sec of bandwidth to support its data needs.  AMD and Intel have gone to great lengths to increase the efficiency of not only their memory controllers and prefetchers, but also the internal caches so fewer main memory accesses are needed.  So essentially a quad core processor would really only need upwards of 12 to 13 GB/sec of bandwidth in real world scenarios.  DDR-3 1333 memory modules in a dual channel configuration would be able to support that kind of bandwidth quite easily.  So what exactly was the point of having faster memory?  Also, CPUs using DDR-3 memory are not as sensitive to latencies as we have seen in previous generations of parts.

Click to read the rest of the article.

16GB of DDR3-1600? Corsair has a couple of kits for that

Subject: General Tech | December 5, 2011 - 01:50 PM |
Tagged: corsair, vengeance, vengeance lp, ddr3-1600, quad channel

With the arrival of quad-channel memory on the X79 chipset, 16GB kits are arriving on the shelves of suppliers.  This amount of memory was once only found on servers but why shouldn't you benefit from a huge pool of RAM on your enthusiast machine.  Corsair has two Vengeance kits on the market, the $90 Vengeance kit @ 9-9-9-24 and the Vengeance LP kit with low profile heatspreaders and timings @ 8-8-8-24 which will cost you about $150.  Interestingly the timings did not seem to effect the benchmarks in a meaningful way, the extra bandwidth available hides the difference though kits with much looser timing may well have an effect.  Speed does still matter as there were improvements on most of the benchmarks once the kits were overclocked.  Read on to see the numbers.

NS_Vengeance.png

"Corsair's quad-channel Vengeance memory modules are designed to work with Intel's new Sandy Bridge-E platform. We put two Vengeance kits to the test to see if running DDR3 memory in quad-channel really make all that much of a difference in practical applications like gaming."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: Neoseeker

Single malt, second opinion, triple checked and quad channel; one of these things is not like the other

Subject: Memory | November 21, 2011 - 03:02 PM |
Tagged: quad channel, x79, Intel DX79SI, corsair CMGTX8, ddr3-1333

If one wanted to explore the actual benefit of the new quad channel memory feature on the X79 motherboard, the most logical way would be to use the same RAM and test it in single, dual, triple and quad channel.  That is exactly what Legit Reviews did using a quad channel kit of DDR3-1333 from Corsair and the Intel SX79SI motherboard, moving from single up to quad channel as well as upping the speed of the DIMMs.  As most may already know, on synthetic benchmarks you do see a relatively linear progression in theoretical bandwidth however the same cannot be said when looking at actual tasks like encoding.   Head on over to see the results.

LR_dominator-gt.jpg

"We started out running a single module at 1333MHz and then another module at a time to test dual channel, triple channel and finally quad channel. The Intel X79 chipet on the Intel SX79SI motherboard was able to properly run each memory configuration. The benchmark results in Sandra 2012 were very impressive in the sense that the benchmark results were nearly linear when moving from single channel to triple channel memory. Adding the fourth module for quad channel performance showed..."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory