Sony relaunches much of the PSN, other services oncoming

Subject: General Tech | May 15, 2011 - 04:29 PM |
Tagged: security, PSN

Some of you may have heard of a recent computer break-in to Sony Computer Entertainment involving some total theft of personal information and uniformly increased grades of University final exams. Approximately three weeks and a few missed deadlines later: portions of the PSN are finally back online and awaiting the eager college students who are finished with their finals to scratch the itch on all the games they missed in the outage. Just kidding, they are going to play Call of Duty again. 

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“… and then Kevin Butler crushed their heads.” (Quote accuracy disputed.)
 
Sony uploaded a video to Youtube on May 14th announcing that access has been regained to the following services:
  • Sign in for PSN and Qriocity
  • Online gameplay for PS3 and PSP
  • Music Unlimited (if you are a current subscriber) for PS3 and PC
  • Access to Netflix, Hulu, Vudu, and MLB from PS3
  • Friends list, chat, trophy comparison, and PlayStation Home 
Gamers returning to their PlayStation are required to change their account passwords prior to reconnecting to the PlaysStation Network and, as reported by PCMag, install a firmware update for their console. It has been a long and hard journey for fans of Sony’s console but it appears as if tangible progress has been made. Go forth, play Portal 2 Co-op, give Atlas a big hug, and let them eat cake. It has been a harsh famine.
Source: PCMag

PSN Attack Fallout Worsens, 12,700 Credit Card Numbers Stolen

Subject: General Tech | May 2, 2011 - 09:59 PM |
Tagged: sony, PSN

Hackers really do not seem to have learned the old adage of not kicking someone when they are down as Sony has learned that hackers have obtained even more personal data from the popular gaming console's multi-player service.  It is believed that 12,700 non-US customer credit card numbers and expiration dates along with 10,700 direct debit bank account numbers of a number of customers in Germany, Austria, Netherlands, and Spain were possibly stolen.  The credit and debit card information was included in an older SOE database from 2007.  Joystiq has claimed in a recent update that Sony has informed them that this information was obtained during the initial attack and was not a new attack.  There is a minuscule amount of hope for those customers in knowing that the security codes located on the back of their cards were not compromised.  Unfortunately, there are still many transactions that can occur without needing to input the security code.

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Ars technica quoted Sony in saying that:
 
"Our ongoing investigation of illegal intrusions into Sony Online Entertainment systems has discovered that hackers may have obtained personal customer information from SOE systems. . . . Stolen information includes, to the extent you provided it to us, the following: name, address (city, state, zip, country), email address, gender, birthdate, phone number, login name and hashed password." (sic)
 
The Playstation Blog has reiterated in a post today that "Sony will not contact you in any way, including by email, asking for your credit card number, social security number or other personally identifiable information.  If you are asked for this information, you can be confident Sony is not the entity asking."  Sony recommends that once the PlayStation Network is back up, their customers should log on and change their password.  Further, they encourage their customers to monitor their bank and credit card statements to protect themselves from unauthorized usage.
Source: ars technica