Is it Bait and Switch or not?

Subject: General Tech | June 17, 2014 - 01:59 PM |
Tagged: kingston, pny, ssdnow v300, optima

There is a wee bit of outrage in the community over the internals of Kingston's SSDNow V300 and PNY's Optima SSDs.  In both cases the internals being sold at the moment do not match the internals that were originally benchmarked and people are outraged that the same product with a different model number has changed internals.  The two drives are marketed towards value conscious purchasers and represent two different cases of modifications; Kingston with a flash change and PNY with a controller change.

The complaints against PNY are a little odd, it would seem that the 4-channel SMI 2246en controller was swapped for an 8-channel LSI SandForce SF-2281 with no price change and the only way you can be upset by that is because of a ridiculous level of brand loyalty.  On the other hand Kingston has switched from Synchronous to Asynchronous NAND flash memory which does have a noticeable impact on performance and the stamina of the flash and also happens to be less expensive to manufacture.  If Kingston had left the price as it was originally and specified the use of Synchronous Flash in the V300 series then you would have a good argument that they had intentionally mislead customers.  The reality is that the type of flash was not specified and the price of a 120GB SSDNow V300 has halved since its release which makes this more of a slightly shady product refresh.  It is not the best way to update your product line but considering the specifics of this particular case it really does not show intent to deceive.

If you really want something to be upset about then consider the example provided by The SSD Review; ASUS's swapping out of the SSD in their ZenBook with utterly no warning or price change.  Now that is Bait and Switch!

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"It seems that the world of technology has stopped with allegations that some SSD companies are pulling the old ‘bait and switch’ routine in their SSDs by switching off components that many had recognized through initial SSD reviews. We have read several reports and forums, most of which simply repeat the original information, and finally have decided to clarify things just a bit from our perspective. Get ready though as many may not like our viewpoint; it goes against the grain somewhat."

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Tech Talk

 

HD Projectors are fun, 3D HD projectors more so

Subject: Displays | December 7, 2011 - 02:40 PM |
Tagged: 3d display, projector, 1080p, optima, optima hd33

In the interests of dispensing with the bad news first, buying an Optima HD33 3D projector will set you back $1500 and does not come with glasses.  On the other hand, thanks to the Texas Instruments 1080p DLP chipset you get full HD resolution image of up to 300" (aka 25') at 1800 ANSI Lumens.  It is active 3D so the projector ships with an RF emitter for the necessary 3D glasses, which are battery powered.  Techware Labs found that the batteries would last about 2 hours before they started to show problems, at that point requiring a 30 minute recharge time over a USB cable.  It supports all HDMI 1.4a mandatory 3D formats, so you have your choice of 3D glasses to purchase which is good as the projector does not ship with 3D glasses in the box.  Optoma sells the BG-ZD101 DLP Link 3D Glasses separately for about $75 each.

TWL_optoma-hd33-37.jpg

Didn't I see this in a recent game sequel?

"Optoma's HD33 projector which is a full 3D 1080P projector gets reviewed by TechwareLabs. Through a full 90 day review we were very impressed with the Optoma HD33 projector and were very reluctant to ship it back. The Optoma is a very well designed, very bright and sharp projection. The very simple option and use made the setup and usage ever so simple. All you need is a wall big enough to project on and 3D content."

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Displays