AMD Considers Bundling FX Processors With Sealed Loop Water Coolers (LCS)

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Processors | August 13, 2011 - 02:53 AM |
Tagged: amd, FX, octocore, water cooling, sealed loop, LCS, hsf

According to Xbit Labs, AMD is considering switching out the usual air cooler (HSF) for a sealed loop liquid cooling solution (LCS) for its high end FX Processors. Specifically, AMD wants to pair their highest end eight core processor (and possibly the next highest end eight core chip) with the sealed loop liquid cooling solution. This information, they believe, comes from a “source with knowledge of the company’s plans.”

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If you are not familiar with the sealed loop water coolers, PC Perspective reviewed the Corsair H70 processor cooler last year and it is a good example. Sealed loop water coolers are similar to the large DIY water cooling loops comprised of a large radiator, copper CPU block, pump, and reservoir all connected in a loop by tubing; however, they usually have smaller radiators and pumps as well as coolant that cannot be refilled (and should not have to be).  This coolant carries heat away from the processor to be dissipated through a radiator.  Corsair in particular has heavily invested in this once very niche product with it’s H series of coolers.

Traditionally, both Intel and AMD have been content in pairing their chips with mid-range but cheap air coolers that did a decent job of keeping the processors within their thermal limits at stock speeds. Enthusiasts, and especially those interested in overclocking, have generally ditched the included cooler in favor of a more powerful and/or quieter aftermarket cooler. Needless to say, including a cooler, especially with high end chips that will likely go to enthusiasts, that’s never even used only serves to add additional unnecessary cost for both consumers and the manufacturer. Thus, this move to bundle a more powerful sealed loop water cooler with its high end chips may be an attempt by AMD to futher appeal to enthusiasts and keep with their traditional image of being friendly to overclockers and hardware enthusiasts. Having and using a water cooler that is supported by the chip maker certainly doesn’t hurt, especially if it ever came down to warranty and RMA situations. On the other hand, enthusiasts can be very picky about which cooler to use in their systems; therefore, bundling a cooler that is sure to add even more extra cost to the package may not be the right move for AMD. At best, consumers are likely to see an extra $50 or so added to the sure to be pricey highest end eight core chips.

Their idea, if true, surely has merit, but is it wise? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Source: Xbit Labs

Xeon powered 2U server room beauty

Subject: Systems | April 25, 2011 - 02:29 PM |
Tagged: xeon, octocore, nehalem, 8 core

 When The Tech Report were asked to review the new Dell R810 2U server they jumped at the chance.  Inside lies dual octocore Xeon X7560s, 128GB of DDR3  (of a maximum 500GB), four SAS 6Gbps drives (which they swapped for Vertex EX SSDs) and a pair of 1100W PSUs.  It is impressive to see all that shoved into a 2U rack but Dell went further with internal SD card readers for easy HyperVisor use, external LCDs to display realtime hardware and software data and a casing much more attractive that you usually see in a server room.  The performance compared to a dual X5670 system varied so you should probably read the review before you go spending $23,000 on the server.

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"Intel's eight-core Nehalem-EX processor and Dell's R810 chassis combine to form a new class of 2P server, with huge memory capacity at a lower price point."

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