NVIDIA SHIELD Will Begin Shipping July 31 With $299 MSRP

Subject: General Tech | July 22, 2013 - 03:19 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, shield, project shield, tegra 4, gaming

NVIDIA has announced that its Shield gaming portable will begin shipping on July 31. The portable gaming console was originally slated to launch on June 27th for $349 but due to an unspecified mechanical issue with a third party component (discovered at the last minute) the company delayed the launch until the problem was fixed. Now, it appears the issue has been resolved and the NVIDIA Shield will launch on July 31 for $299 or $50 less than the original MSRP.

As a refresher, Project Shield, or just Shield as it is known now, is a portable game console that is made up of a controller, mobile-class hardware internals, and an integrated 5” 720 touchscreen display that hinges clam shell style from the back of the controller.. It runs the Android Jelly Bean operating system and can play Android games as well as traditional PC games that are streamed from PCs with a qualifying NVIDIA graphics card. On the inside, Shield has a NVIDIA Tegra 4 SoC (quad core ARM Cortex A15-based CPU with NVIDIA’s proprietary GPU technology added in), 2GB RAM, and 16GB of storage. In all, the Shield measures 158mm (W) x 135mm (D) x 57mm (H) and weighs about 1.2 pounds. The controller is reminiscent of an Xbox 360 game pad.

With the third party mechanical issue out of the way, the Shield is ready to ship on July 31 and is already avialble for pre-order. Gamers will be able to test out the Shield at Shield Experience Centers located at certain GameStop, Microcenter, and Canada Computers shops in the US and Canada. The hardware will also be available for purchase at the usual online retailers for $299 (MSRP). 

Source: NVIDIA

NVIDIA Releases 326.19 Beta Driver, Adds Support for 4K Tiled Displays!

Subject: Graphics Cards, Displays | July 18, 2013 - 08:16 PM |
Tagged: pq321q, PQ321, nvidia, drivers, asus, 4k

It would appear that NVIDIA was paying attention to our recent live stream where we unboxed and setup our new ASUS PQ321Q 4K 3840x2160 monitor.  During our setup on the AMD and NVIDIA based test beds I noticed (and the viewers saw) some less than desirable results during initial configuration.  The driver support was pretty clunky, we had issues with reliability of booting and switching between SST and MST (single and multi stream transport) modes caused the card some issue as well. 

4kdriver.png

Today NVIDIA released a new R326 driver, 326.19 beta, that improves performance in a couple of games but more importantly, adds support for "tiled 4K displays."  If you don't know what that means, you aren't alone.  A tiled display is one that is powered by multiple heads and essentially acts as multiple screens in a single housing.  The ASUS PQ321Q monitor that we have in house, and the Sharp PN-K321, are tiled displays that use DisplayPort 1.2 MST technology to run at 3840x2160 @ 60 Hz. 

It is great to see NVIDIA reacting quickly to new technologies and to our issues from just under a week gone by.  If you have either of these displays, be sure to give the new driver a shot and let me know your results!

Source: NVIDIA

Please Tip Your Server of Raspberry Pi. 5V DC Customary.

Subject: General Tech, Storage | July 18, 2013 - 04:56 PM |
Tagged: Raspberry Pi, nvidia, HPC, amazon

Adam DeConinck, high performance computing (HPC) systems engineer for NVIDIA, built a personal computer cluster in his spare time. While not exactly high performance, especially when compared to the systems he maintains for Amazon and his employer, its case is made of Lego and seems to be under a third of a cubic foot in volume.

It is a cluster of five Raspberry Pi devices and an eight-port Ethernet switch.

NVIDIA_Pi.jpg

Image source: NVIDIA Blogs

Raspberry Pi is based on a single-core ARM CPU bundled on an SoC with a 24 GFLOP GPU and 256 or 512 MB of memory. While this misses the cutesy point of the story, I am skeptical of the expected 16W power rating. Five Raspberry Pis, with Ethernet, draw a combined maximum of 17.5W, alone, and even that neglects the draw of the networking switch. My, personal, 8-port unmanaged switch is rated to draw 12W which, when added to 17.5W, is not 16W and thus something is being neglected or averaged. Then again, his device, power is his concern.

Despite constant development and maintenance of interconnected computers, professionally, Adam's will for related hobbies has not been displaced. Even after the initial build, he already plans to graft the Hadoop framework and really reign in the five ARM cores for something useful...

... but, let's be honest, probably not too useful.

Source: NVIDIA Blogs
Subject: Mobile
Manufacturer: MSI

Introduction and Design

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With the release of Haswell upon us, we’re being treated to an impacting refresh of some already-impressive notebooks. Chief among the benefits is the much-championed battery life improvements—and while better power efficiency is obviously valuable where portability is a primary focus, beefier models can also benefit by way of increased versatility. Sure, gaming notebooks are normally tethered to an AC adapter, but when it’s time to unplug for some more menial tasks, it’s good to know that you won’t be out of juice in a couple of hours.

Of course, an abundance of gaming muscle never hurts, either. As the test platform for one of our recent mobile GPU analyses, MSI’s 15.6” GT60 gaming notebook is, for lack of a better description, one hell of a beast. Following up on Ryan’s extensive GPU testing, we’ll now take a more balanced and comprehensive look at the GT60 itself. Is it worth the daunting $1,999 MSRP? Does the jump to Haswell provide ample and economical benefits? And really, how much of a difference does it make in terms of battery life?

Our GT60 test machine featured the following configuration:

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In case it wasn’t already apparent, this device makes no compromises. Sporting a desktop-grade GPU and a quad-core Haswell CPU, it looks poised to be the most powerful notebook we’ve tested to date. Other configurations exist as well, spanning various CPU, GPU, and storage options. However, all available GT60 configurations feature a 1080p anti-glare screen, discrete graphics (starting at the GTX 670M and up), Killer Gigabit LAN, and a case built from metal and heavy-duty plastic. They also come preconfigured with Windows 8, so the only way to get Windows 7 with your GT60 is to purchase it through a reseller that performs customizations.

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Continue reading our review of the MSI GT60 Gaming Notebook!!

Tegra 4-Powered ZTE Geek U988S Smartphone Headed For China Mobile

Subject: Mobile | July 16, 2013 - 04:40 AM |
Tagged: zte, tegra 4, td-scdma, smartphone, nvidia, china mobile

Details have leaked on a new ZTE smartphone called the Geek U988S thanks to China's TENNA certification database. The Geek is powered by NVIDIA’s latest-generation Tegra 4 SoC and is headed for Chinese wireless carrier China Mobile and its TD-SCDMA network.

ZTE Geek U988S Tegra 4 Smartphone.jpg

Along with leaked specifications, the TENNA site has photos of its upcoming smartphone. The pictured model has a pink colored chassis with a large 5-inch touchscreen LCD with a resolution of 1920 x 1080. A 2MP webcam sits above the display and the rear of the phone hosts an 8MP camera. The device measures 144 x 71 x 9mm.

Internal hardware includes a Tegra 4 SoC clocked at 1.8GHz and 2GB of RAM. The phone works on China’s TD-SCDMA network.

There is no word on pricing or availability, but photos and a specs list can be found here

Source: Engadget
Author:
Manufacturer: Galaxy

Overclocked GTX 770 from Galaxy

When NVIDIA launched the GeForce GTX 770 at the very end of May, we started to get in some retail samples from companies like Galaxy.  While our initial review looked at the reference models, other add-in card vendors are putting their own unique touch on the latest GK104 offering and Galaxy was kind enough to send us their GeForce GTX 770 2GB GC model that uses a unique, more efficient cooler design and also runs at overclocked frequencies. 

If you haven't yet read up on the GTX 770 GPU, you should probably stop by my first review of the GTX 770 to see what information you are missing out on.  Essentially, the GTX 770 is a full-spec GK104 Kepler GPU running at higher clocks (both core and memory speeds) compared to the original GTX 680.  The new reference clocks for the GTX 770 were 1046 MHz base clock, 1085 MHz Boost clock and a nice increase to 7.0 GHz memory speeds.

gpuz.png

Galaxy GeForce GTX 770 2GB GC Specs

The Galaxy GC model is overclocked with a new base clock setting of 1111 MHz and a higher Boost clock of 1163 MHz; both are about 6.5-7.0% higher than the original clocks.  Galaxy has left the memory speeds alone though keeping them running at 7.0 GHz effectively.

IMG_9941.JPG

Continue reading our review of the Galaxy GeForce GTX 770 2GB GC graphics card!!

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Another Wrench – GeForce GTX 760M Results

Just recently, I evaluated some of the current processor-integrated graphics options from our new Frame Rating performance metric. The results were very interesting, proving Intel has done some great work with its new HD 5000 graphics option for Ultrabooks. You might have noticed that the MSI GE40 didn’t just come with the integrated HD 4600 graphics but also included a discrete NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760M, on-board.  While that previous article was to focus on the integrated graphics of Haswell, Trinity, and Richland, I did find some noteworthy results with the GTX 760M that I wanted to investigate and present.

IMG_0141.JPG

The MSI GE40 is a new Haswell-based notebook that includes the Core i7-4702MQ quad-core processor and Intel HD 4600 graphics.  Along with it MSI has included the Kepler architecture GeForce GTX 760M discrete GPU.

760mspecs.png

This GPU offers 768 CUDA cores running at a 657 MHz base clock but can stretch higher with GPU Boost technology.  It is configured with 2GB of GDDR5 memory running at 2.0 GHz

If you didn’t read the previous integrated graphics article, linked above, you’re going to have some of the data presented there spoiled and so you might want to get a baseline of information by getting through that first.  Also, remember that we are using our Frame Rating performance evaluation system for this testing – a key differentiator from most other mobile GPU testing.  And in fact it is that difference that allowed us to spot an interesting issue with the configuration we are showing you today. 

If you are not familiar with the Frame Rating methodology, and how we had to change some things for mobile GPU testing, I would really encourage you to read this page of the previous mobility Frame Rating article for the scoop.  The data presented below depends on that background knowledge!

Okay, you’ve been warned – on to the results.

Continue reading our story about GeForce GTX 760M Frame Rating results and Haswell Optimus issues!!

Just Delivered: The Latest Midrange to High End NVIDIA Graphics Cards from ASUS

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 10, 2013 - 01:48 PM |
Tagged: Overclocked, nvidia, just delivered, gtx 780, gtx 770, gtx 760, GTX 670 Mini, DirectCU II, DCII, asus

Returning home on Monday, I was greeted by several (slightly wet) boxes from Asus.  Happily, the rainstorm that made these boxes a bit damp did not last long, and the wetness was only superficial.  The contents were perfectly fine.  I was pleased by this, but not particularly pleased with FedEx for leaving them in a spot where they got wet.  All complaints aside, I was obviously ecstatic to get the boxes.

asus_jd_01.jpg

Quite the lineup.  The new packaging is sharp looking and clearly defines the contents.

Inside these boxes are some of the latest and greatest video cards from Asus.  Having just finished up a budget roundup, I had the bandwidth available to tackle a much more complex task.  Asus sent four cards for our testing procedures, and I intend to go over them with a fine toothed comb.

The smallest of the bunch is the new GTX 670 DC Mini.  Asus did some serious custom work to not only get the card as small as it is, but also to redesign the power delivery system so that the chip only requires a single 8 pin PCI-E power connection.  Most GTX 670 boards require 2 x 6 pin connectors which would come out to be around 225 watts delivered, but a single 8 pin would give around 175 watts total.  This is skirting the edge of the official draw for the GTX 670, but with the GK104 chip being as mature as it is, there is some extra leeway involved.  The cooler is quite compact and apparently pretty quiet.  This is aimed at the small form factor crowd who do not want/need a overly large card, but still require a lot of performance.  While the GTX 700 series is now hitting the streets, there is still a market for this particular card.  Oh, and it is also overclocked for good measure!

asus_jd_02.jpg

We see a nice progression from big to little.  It is amazing how small the GTX 670 DC Mini is compared to the rest, and it will be quite interesting to see how it compares to the GTX 760 in testing.

The second card is the newly released GTX 760 DCII OC.  This is again based on the tried and true GK104 chip, but has several units disabled.  It has 1152 CUDA cores, but retains the same number of ROPS as the fully enabled chips.  It also features the full 256 bit memory bus running at 6 Gbps.  It has plenty of bandwidth to provide the card in most circumstances considering the amount of functional units enabled.  The cooler is one of the new DirectCU II designs and is a nice upgrade in both functionality and looks from the previous DCII models.  It is a smaller card than one would expect, but that comes from the need to simplify the card and not overbuild it like the higher priced 770 and 780 cards.  As I have mentioned before, I really like the budget and midrange cards.  This should be a really fascinating card to test.

The next card is a bit of an odd bird.  The GTX 770 DCII OC is essentially a slightly higher clocked GTX 680 from yesteryear.  One of the big changes is that this particular model foregoes the triple slot cooler of the previous generation and implements a dual slot cooler that is quite heavy and with a good fin density.  It features six pin and eight pin power connections so it has some legs for overclocking.  The back plate is there for stability and protection, and it gives the board a very nice, solid feel.  Asus added two LEDs by the power connections which show if the card is receiving power or not.  This is nice, as the fans on this card are very silent in most situations.  Nobody wants to unplug a video card that is powered up.  It retains the previous generation DCII styling, but the cooler performance is certainly nothing to sneeze at.  It also is less expensive than the previous GTX 680, but is faster.

asus_jd_03.jpg

All of the cards sport dual DVI, DisplayPort, and HDMI outputs.  Both DVI ports are dual-link, but only one is DVI-I which can also output a VGA signal with the proper adapter.

Finally we have the big daddy of the GTX 700 series.  The 780 DCII OC is pretty much a monster card that exceeds every other offering out there, except the $1K GTX Titan.  It is a slightly cut down chip as compared to the mighty Titan, but it still packs in 2304 CUDA cores.  It retains the 384 bit memory bus and runs at a brisk 6 Gbps for a whopping 288.4 GB/sec of bandwidth.  The core is overclocked to a base of 889 MHz and boosts up to 941 MHz.  The cooler on this is massive.  It features a brand new fan design for the front unit which apparently can really move the air and do so quietly.  Oddly enough, this fan made its debut appearance on the aforementioned GTX 670 DC Mini.  The PCB on the GTX 780 DCII OC is non-reference.  It features a new power delivery system that should keep this board humming when overclocked.  Asus has done their usual magic in pairing the design with high quality components which should ensure a long lifespan for this pretty expensive board.

asus_jd_04.jpg

I do like the protective plates on the backs of the bigger cards, but the rear portion of the two smaller cards are interesting as well.  We will delve more into the "Direct Power" functionality in the full review.

I am already well into testing these units and hope to have the full roundup late next week.  These are really neat cards and any consumer looking to buy a new one should certainly check out the review once it is complete.

asus_jd_05.jpg

Asus has gone past the "Superpipe" stage with the GTX 780.  That is a 10 mm heatpipe we are seeing.  All of the DCII series coolers are robust, and even the DC Mini can dissipate a lot of heat.

Source: Asus
Author:
Manufacturer: Various

Battle of the IGPs

Our long journey with Frame Rating, a new capture-based analysis tool to measure graphics performance of PCs and GPUs, began almost two years ago as a way to properly evaluate the real-world experiences for gamers.  What started as a project attempting to learn about multi-GPU complications has really become a new standard in graphics evaluation and I truly believe it will play a crucial role going forward in GPU and game testing. 

Today we use these Frame Rating methods and tools, which are elaborately detailed in our Frame Rating Dissected article, and apply them to a completely new market: notebooks.  Even though Frame Rating was meant for high performance discrete desktop GPUs, the theory and science behind the entire process is completely applicable to notebook graphics and even on the integrated graphics solutions on Haswell processors and Richland APUs.  It also is able to measure performance of discrete/integrated graphics combos from NVIDIA and AMD in a unique way that has already found some interesting results.

 

Battle of the IGPs

Even though neither side wants us to call it this, we are testing integrated graphics today.  With the release of Intel’s Haswell processor (the Core i7/i5/i3 4000) the company has upgraded the graphics noticeably on several of their mobile and desktop products.  In my first review of the Core i7-4770K, a desktop LGA1150 part, the integrated graphics now known as the HD 4600 were only slightly faster than the graphics of the previous generation Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge.  Even though we had all the technical details of the HD 5000 and Iris / Iris Pro graphics options, no desktop parts actually utilize them so we had to wait for some more hardware to show up. 

 

mbair.JPG

When Apple held a press conference and announced new MacBook Air machines that used Intel’s Haswell architecture, I knew I could count on Ken to go and pick one up for himself.  Of course, before I let him start using it for his own purposes, I made him sit through a few agonizing days of benchmarking and testing in both Windows and Mac OS X environments.  Ken has already posted a review of the MacBook Air 11-in model ‘from a Windows perspective’ and in that we teased that we had done quite a bit more evaluation of the graphics performance to be shown later.  Now is later.

So the first combatant in our integrated graphics showdown with Frame Rating is the 11-in MacBook Air.  A small, but powerful Ultrabook that sports more than 11 hours of battery life (in OS X at least) but also includes the new HD 5000 integrated graphics options.  Along with that battery life though is the GT3 variation of the new Intel processor graphics that doubles the number of compute units as compared to the GT2.  The GT2 is the architecture behind the HD 4600 graphics that sits with nearly all of the desktop processors, and many of the notebook versions, so I am very curious how this comparison is going to stand. 

Continue reading our story on Frame Rating with Haswell, Trinity and Richland!!

Podcast #258 - Corsair 900D, HD 7790 vs GTX 650Ti BOOST, Leaked AMD APUs and more!

Subject: General Tech | July 4, 2013 - 12:45 AM |
Tagged: podcast, video, corsair, 900D, 7790, 650ti boost, amd, Richland, nvidia, kepler, titan, Intel, ssd

PC Perspective Podcast #258 - 07/04/2013

Join us this week as we discuss the Corsair 900D, HD 7790 vs GTX 650Ti BOOST, Leaked AMD APUs and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom and Allyn Malventano

Program length: 1:14:23

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. 0:58:25 Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
    1. Allyn: USB Practical Meter (kickstarter)
  4. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  5. Closing/outro