Nintendo Joins the Khronos Group

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 26, 2015 - 03:46 PM |
Tagged: Nintendo, Khronos

Console developers need to use the APIs that are laid out by the system's creator. Nintendo has their own graphics API for the last three generations, called GX, although it is rumored to be somewhat like OpenGL. A few days ago, Nintendo's logo appeared on the Khronos Group's website as a Contributor Member. This leads sites like The Register to speculate that Nintendo “pledges allegiance to the Vulkan (API)”.

I wouldn't be so hasty.


There are many reasons why a company would want to become a member of the Khronos Group. Microsoft, for instance, decided that the small, $15,000 USD/year membership fee was worth it to influence the future of WebGL. Nintendo, at least currently, does not make their own web browser, they license NetFront from Access Co. Ltd., but that could change (just like their original choice of Opera Mini did). Even with a licensed browser, they might want to discuss and vote on the specifics. But yes, WebGL is unlikely to be on their minds, let alone a driving reason, especially since they are not involved with the W3C. Another unlikely option is OpenCL, especially if they get into cloud services, but I can't see them caring enough about the API to do anything more than blindly use it.

Vulkan is, in fact, most likely what Nintendo is interested in, but that also doesn't mean that they will support it. The membership fee is quite low for a company like Nintendo, and, even if they don't use the API, their input could benefit them, especially since they rely upon third parties for graphics processors. Pushing for additions to Vulkan could force GPU vendors to adopt it, so it will be available for their own APIs, and so forth. There might even be some learning, up to the limits of the Khronos Group's confidentiality requirements.

Or, of course, Nintendo could adopt the Vulkan API to some extent. We'll see. Either way, the gaming company is beginning to open up with industry bodies. This could be positive.

Source: NeoGAF

Super Mario Sunshine and Pikmin 2 at 1080p 60 FPS

Subject: General Tech | February 12, 2015 - 08:30 AM |
Tagged: reverse-consolitis, PC, Nintendo, emulator, dolphin

Update: Fixed the title of "Pikmin". Accidentally wrote "Pikman".

Considering the recent Nintendo license requirements, I expect that their demonstrative YouTube videos will have a difficult time staying online. Regardless, if you are in a jurisdiction where this is legal, it is now possible to play some Gamecube-era games at 60 FPS (as well as 1080p) with an emulator PC.


The blog post at the Dolphin Emulator's website goes into the “hack” in detail. The main problem is that these games are tied to specific framerates, which will cause problems with sound processing and other, time-sensitive bits of code. I have actually been told that one of the most difficult aspects of bringing a console game to the PC (or restoring an old PC game) is touching the timing code. It will break things all over. For Super Mario Sunshine, this also involves patching the game such that certain parts are still ticked at 30 FPS, despite the render occurring at twice that rate.

Also interesting is that some games, like Super Smash Bros. Melee, did not require a game-side patch. Why? Because they apparently include a slow-motion setting by default, which was enabled and then promptly sped up to real time, resulting in a higher frame rate at normal speed. The PC is nothing if not interesting.

Rumor: AMD Could Power Nintendo's Next Console

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Systems | December 23, 2014 - 04:07 AM |
Tagged: x86, Nintendo, arm, amd

The tea leaves that WCCFTech have been reading are quite scattered, but they could be right. The weaker half is pulled from an interview between Shigeru Miyamoto and the Associated Press. At the very end, the creator of many Nintendo franchises states, “While we're busy working on software for the Wii U, we have production lines that are working on ideas for what the next system might be.”

Of course they do. That is not confirmation of a new console.


Original Mario Bros. Screenshot Credit: Giant Bomb (Modified)

A bit earlier, he also states, “I think that maybe when we release the next hardware system, you can look forward to seeing Mario take on a new role or in a new game.”

This, on the other hand, sounds a little bit like they are iterating on game design ideas that will shape the next console. From what I understand, this is how Nintendo tends to work – they apparently engineer hardware around concept use cases. It could also be a mistake.

The rumor's stronger half is a statement from Devinder Kumar, the CFO of AMD.

“I will say that one [design win] is x86 and [another] is ARM, and at least one will [be] beyond gaming, right,” said Devinder Kumar, chief financial officer of AMD, at the Raymond James Financial technology conference. “But that is about as much as you going to get out me today. From the standpoint [of being] fair to [customers], it is their product, and they launch it. They are going to announce it and then […] you will find out that it is AMD’s APU that is being used in those products.”

So AMD has secured design wins from two companies, one gaming and the other is something else. Also, one design will be x86 and the other will be ARM-based. This could be an awkward co-incidence but, at the same time, there are not too many gaming companies around.

Also, if it is Nintendo, which architecture would they choose? x86 is the common instruction set amongst the PC and other two consoles, and it is easy to squeeze performance out of. On the other hand, Nintendo has been vocal about Apple and the mobile market, which could have them looking at ARM, especially if the system design is particularly abnormal. Beyond that, AMD could have offered Nintendo an absolute steal of a deal in an effort to get a high-profile customer associated with their ARM initiative.

Or, again, this could all be coincidence.

Source: WCCFTech

Nintendo Sells 425,000 Wii U Consoles, 1.75 Million Hardware Units In November

Subject: General Tech | December 7, 2012 - 04:42 AM |
Tagged: Wii U, Nintendo, gaming, engadget, console

Nintendo recently unveiled its next generation console with the Wii U. While Ryan managed to get his hands on a couple of consoles, I still have not been able to get a hold of the elusive 32GB black SKU because they have been sold out at the retail stores in my area since launch day. Specifically, new data uncovered by the NPD Group puts into perspective just how popular Nintendo's new hardware is by the sheer number of units purchased in the first week of sales alone!

According to a press release by the NPD Group (available here), Nintendo managed to sell 1.75 million units of hardware in the US from October 28th to November 24th. The 1.75 million total units is further broken down between mobile and console hardware. For mobile, Nintendo sold an impressive 910,000 mobile gaming handhelds. On the console side of things, the results are not record breaking but still notable. Nintendo sold 845,000 consoles during the entire month of november.

Nintendo Wii U Game Console Black.jpg

Surprisingly, the majority of those 845,000 sales are comprised of Wii U sales over a one week period. During the first week of the Wii U being launched, Nintendo sold 425,000 consoles.  That is in comparison to the original Wii’s 475,000 consoles sold in its first week. Another interesting console number is that Nintendo has managed to sell 40 million total consoles since its launch, so the new Wii U still has a long way to go before it can topple the original motion-controlled console.

The NPD Group attributes the successful sale of 1.75 million units of gaming hardware to Black Friday sales and the initial launch excitement surrounding the new Wii U. It will be interesting to see if the Wii U will surpass its predecessor in popularity, and how long it will take to do so.


I'm sure he broke the warranty on this torn apart Wii U so it is a good thing he didn't brick it with a failed firmware update! (heh)

Overall, it does appear to be a decent system with DRM, a 2GB firmware update, and retail (un)availability being the only major gripes from the Internet that I’ve picked up on. I look forward to getting my hands on some games to see how well the asynchronous gameplay works with the new gamepad in particular.

Are you excited about he Wii U?

See a full tear down of the Wii U with photos, video, and leftover screws at PC Perspective.

Source: Engadget
Manufacturer: Nintendo

We go inside the Wii U

Last night after the midnight release of the new Nintendo Wii U gaming console, we did what any self respecting hardware fan would do: we tore it apart.  That's right, while live on our PC Perspective Live! page, we opened up a pair of Wii U consoles, played a couple of games on the Deluxe while we took a tri-wing screwdriver to the second.  Inside we found some interesting hardware (and a lot more screws) and at the conclusion of the 5+ hour marathon, we had a reassembled system with only a handful of leftover screws!

If you missed the show last night we have archived the entire video on our YouTube channel (embedded below) as well as the photos we took during the event in their full resolution glory.  There isn't much to discuss about the teardown other than what we said in the video but I am going to leave a few comments after each set of four images.

OH!  And if you missed the live event and want to be apart of another one, we are going to be holding a Hitman: Absolution Game Stream on our Live Page sponsored by AMD with giveaways like Radeon graphics cards and LOTS of game keys!  Stop by again and see us on on Tuesday the 20th at 8pm ET.


During the stream we promised photos of everything we did while taking it apart, so here you go!  Click to get the full size image!


Getting inside the Wii U was surprisingly easy as the white squares over the screws were simply stickers and we didn't have to worry about any clips breaking, etc.  The inside is dominated by the optical drive provided by Panasonic.

Continue reading to see ALL the images from our Nintendo Wii U Teardown!!

Wii U will be the gift that keeps on giving for AMD

Subject: General Tech | September 20, 2012 - 02:57 PM |
Tagged: Nintendo, Wii U, amd

Nintendo and AMD today announced that the next generation Wii will use a graphics chip designed and provided by AMD.  This is great news that will help AMD's bottom line for quite a while to come as the console business is very different that the PC business.  Instead of having to continually invest money into research and development into new architectures in order to keep releasing brand new families of GPUs in order to keep up with the competition, once the Wii is released AMD's R&D is over and done with.  Instead, the GPU in the Wii U will be a source of income with only the production costs on the expense side of the balance sheet, which is a cost per chip which will decline over time as the production facilities perfect the fabrication process.  Consoles generations last a long time and for the entire existence of the Wii U, AMD will be making money from the console.  You can read more about what the Wii U will be able to do on Nintendo's site though we still do not have much information on the actual GPU hardware specifications.


"As excited as Nintendo may be about this launch, AMD is equally excited to be a proud technology partner and supplier of the GPU technology for the Wii U. This partnership is another example of AMD’s graphics leadership and innovation, enabling the most dynamic, immersive gaming experiences regardless of platform."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: AMD

E3 sprouts rumours and facts about the next generation of consoles

Subject: General Tech | July 7, 2011 - 12:46 PM |
Tagged: ps4, xbox, Nintendo, consoles, amd, E3, cell processor

[H]ard|OCP heard quite a bit about the new generation of consoles via the grape vine at E3.  The big winner is AMD, who will be providing the graphical power for all three of the next generation of major consoles as well as being in the running for putting a Bulldozer APU inside Sony's next game system.  IBM is the other competitor for providing Nintendo's core with an updated Cell processor, which also will be running in the next generation XBox.  Nintendo is also going with IBM, though they are looking at a custom built 45nm CPU.  This is very good news for AMD, with a guaranteed presence in every console and a possible hardware monopoly with Sony.


"Guys talk, you hear things. And at this year's E3 HardOCP picked up a lot of information about the upcoming hardware in the next generation consoles. It will be interesting to see if our rumor mill churns up truth or fiction. We wanted to get this out the week after E3, but we had some I's to dot and some T's to cross."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: [H]ard|OCP

Wii U Revealed To Contain Last Gen PC DirectX 10.1 Capable AMD Radeon GPU

Subject: Systems | June 14, 2011 - 05:08 PM |
Tagged: Wii U, radeon, r770, Nintendo, amd

While the current Nintendo console’s internals are very underpowered compared to the competition from the Xbox 360 and PS3, the company looks to leapfrog those consoles in the graphics department with the upcoming Wii U console. According to Engadget, the new Nintendo offering will come equipped with a GPU much like that of AMD’s 4800 series. The custom R770 chip is DirectX 10.1 and multi-display capable, allowing the console to output up to four SD video streams.

While the proposed chip is last-generation in terms of PC gaming, on the console front it will be the current highest-end GPU, with the Xbox 360 using a custom ATI X1900 GPU and the PS3 employing a custom RSX (”Reality Synthesizer”) graphics chip based on NVIDIA’s 7800GTX PC graphics card.

What do you think about Nintendo’s move to employ the AMD GPU?

Source: Engadget

AMD, IBM, Nintendo: Over ten years of The Wii U nit.

Subject: General Tech, Shows and Expos | June 8, 2011 - 03:06 AM |
Tagged: Nintendo, E3, amd

Nintendo’s hardware manufacturers have been pretty stable for the last two generations of consoles. Following the NEC and SGI pairing of the Nintendo 64, Nintendo roped in the talents of IBM and AMD to create the hardware for the GameCube. With the transition to the Wii, AMD and IBM remained as the hardware producers for Nintendo’s console and with the announcement of the Wii U (the successor to the Wii) that will still remain true.


HOOOOOOOO Wii! (Image by Nintendo)

AMD published a press release to state that the Wii U will contain AMD Radeon HD graphics to power Nintendo’s first entry to the high definition club. AMD touted their experience in multiple display support during their Wii U press release which would be suitable for the LCD monitors embedded in their controllers. IBM also released a statement confirming that they are shipping multi-core 45nm parts for the Nintendo’s next-generation console but did not state any more details such as how many cores or their clock speed.

Nintendo is rarely ever vocal about the specifications of their consoles and this version is no different. For their entire press conference Nintendo did not even show the console itself opting to focus on the controller and software. Beyond the controller, the hardware looks to be comparable to Microsoft and Sony’s offering from the limited info and screen shots we have seen. More info should come up as we approach the Wii U’s launch in a little over a year.

Source: marketwire