Also Not CES 2013: RIP Messenger, 7/22/1999 - 3/15/2013

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | January 9, 2013 - 04:08 AM |
Tagged: MSN, MSN Messenger

Windows Live Messenger, formerly MSN Messenger, almost lived to see its fourteenth birthday.

The messaging service will continue to live on in our hearts, minds, and China. A butterfly flapped its wings and stirred up a storm of trouble for AOL with its superior webcam capabilities. The purchase of a competing service by Microsoft should have come as a well Timed Warner of an impending fate similar to which AIM suffered.

MSN_Messenger_logo.png

We should remember Messenger as a fighter who swam against the Windows Live Waves. While it now looks down on us from the Skype I imagine it is at peace. It knows that it did all that it could. It knows that Skype fairly beat it at its own game.

Getting progressively worse with each and every version.

So long MSN! My Trillian contact list will feel emptier without you! But please do not be offended by my eulogy, as I say this in the utmost respect: Yahoo!

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Source: Forbes

Windows Live Messenger or mass censor? No TPB links in chat

Subject: General Tech | March 26, 2012 - 02:21 AM |
Tagged: MSN Messenger, censorship

Microsoft disables linking The Pirate Bay through Windows Live Messenger and third-party applications using the protocol. 

A few years ago, one common attack vector for malware was to hijack messenger clients and send malware links to users on your friends list. Later malware was programmed aggressively enough to hold simple conversation as they attempted to gain the user’s trust.

At some point, Microsoft decided to block links to known attack sites in an attempt to prevent users from lemming their computer.

msn-tpb.jpg

You're dead linked to me...

Recently Microsoft has decided to add the current URL of The Pirate Bay to their block list. Microsoft has not made an announcement whether their employee, a third party company, or a computer algorithm censored The Pirate Bay. Microsoft has accidentally blocked links to Youtube in 2008 due to a mistake caused by one of their third party partners.

Since The Pirate Bay was the only torrent tracker to be blocked by MSN, it is entirely possible that an infected ad link could have automatically added the site to the block list. Google maintains a similar blacklist to be used in their Chrome browser and their search page.

So what do you guys think? Accidental or deliberate? Internal, External, or Automatic?