Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse: Designed With And For Professional eSports Players

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2016 - 03:00 AM |
Tagged: pro, mouse, logitech g, logitech, gaming

Readers of PC Perspective have noticed that in the last couple of years a very familiar name has been asserting itself again in the world of gaming peripherals. Logitech, once the leader and creator of the gaming-specific market with devices like the G15 keyboard, found itself in a rut and was being closed in on by competitors such as Razer, Corsair and SteelSeries. The Logitech G brand was born and a renewed focus on this growing and enthusiastic market took place. We have reviewed several of the company’s new products including the G933/633 gaming headsets, G402 mouse that included an accelerometer and the G29 racing wheel.

Today Logitech is announcing the Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse. As the name would imply, this mouse is targeted at gamers that fancy themselves as professionals, or aspiring to be so. As a result, I imagine that many “normie” PC gamers will find the design, features and pricing to be attractive enough to put next to the keyboard on their desk. This is a wired-only mouse.

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The design of the Pro Gaming Mouse is very similar to that of the Logitech G100s, a long running and very popular mouse with the professional community. It falls a bit on the small side but Logitech claims that the “small and nimble profile allows gamers of many different game types to play as precisely as possible.” It’s incredibly light as well – measuring in at just 83g!

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This mouse has 6 programmable buttons, much less than some of the more extreme “gaming” mice on the market, all of which can be controlled through the Logitech Gaming Software platform. The on-board memory on the Pro allows gamers to configure the mouse on their own system and take those settings with them to competition or friends’ PCs without the need to re-install software.

RGB lights are of course included with the Pro mouse and I like the idea of the wrap around the sides and back of the mouse to add some flair to the design. 

Logitech is using the PMW3366 sensor in the Pro Gaming Mouse, the same used in the G502, G900 and others. Though mouse sensors might be overlooked for their importance in a gaming, the PMW3366 optical sensor is known to deliver accurate translations from 200-12,000 DPI with no acceleration or smoothing integrated that might hinder the input from the gamer.

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The buttons on the Logitech G Pro use a torsion spring system rated at 20 million clicks (!!) which works out to 25 kilometers of button travel for the life of the mouse. The spring system used is designed to minimize effort and distance required for button actuation.

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All aspects of the mouse were built with gamers in mind and with Logitech’s in-house professional gamers at the design table. Everything from the plastic feel, size, weight, etc. The scroll wheel is optimized for gamer’s use, not productivity, while the braided cable prevents snags. And the best part? The Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse is set to have an MSRP of just $69.

The full press release is after the break and we are due to have a Logitech G Pro Gaming Mouse in our hands later today. We will follow up with thoughts and impressions soon!

Source: Logitech

Allyn isn't the only one with a Lapdog on his couch

Subject: General Tech | June 20, 2016 - 05:40 PM |
Tagged: RGB, mouse, lapdog, keyboard, gaming control center, couchmaster, Couch, corsair

The Tech Report would like to back Al up in saying that gaming on a TV from the comfort of your couch is not as weird as some would think.  In their case it was Star Wars Battlefront and Civilization V which were tested out, Battlefront as it is a console game often played on a TV and Civ5 as it is not a twitch game and the extra screen real estate is useful.  They also like the device although they might like a smaller version so that keyboards without a numpad did not leave as much room ... perhaps a PocketDog?  Check out their quick review if Al's review almost sold you on the idea.

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"Corsair's Lapdog keyboard tray is built to bridge the gap between the desk and the den by giving gamers a way to put a keyboard and mouse right on their laps. We invited the Lapdog into our living room to see whether it's a good boy."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Corsair

Introduction and Unboxing

A few years ago, Ryan reviewed the Couchmaster. It was a simple keyboard and mouse holder that suspended those parts above your lap, much like a computer chair, but at your couch. It was a cool concept, but at the time, living room PC gaming hadn't gained much popularity. While we don't all suddenly have living room PCs, the concept has gained some steam. We've seen recent launches of devices like the Corsair Bulldog - a rather beefy DIY living room PC meant to handle enough hardware to support living room gaming at up to 4K resolutions. This left a bit of a gap in Corsair's lineup. They make keyboards, mice, and now a living room PC, but where do you put those peripherals while sitting on your couch? Enter the Corsair Lapdog:

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Along with the Lapdog, Corsair passed along a Vengeance K70 (single LED color, but with key-by-key adjustability) keyboard and an M65 Pro RGB mouse

Setup

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Above is the setup process staged with the keyboard and mouse plugged into the integrated 4-port USB 3.0 hub. Note that we did not need to plug in both keyboard connectors as there is no need to use the USB pass-through feature of these keyboards as the mouse gets its own dedicated port. Owners of the older K70 RGBs might note that even though the early models did not come with a pass-through port, they still had an additional connector for additional USB current. Fear not, as the second plug of those keyboards is also not needed here since the Lapdog uses a powered USB 3.0 hub that can provide sufficient current to light up those models over that single connector.

The cable that combines both power and USB connection from the Lapdog to the wall/PC is 16 feet long, which should provide plenty of space to stretch between just about any TV + couch combination. It was a great idea by Corsair to combine the USB cable and power cable in this way, minimizing the mess and cable clutter that reaches across the floor. You get another 5 feet or so of length for the 12V power adapater as well, so install should be a breeze for users.

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Here we see the removable block-off plate. This comes pre-installed in case the user intends to use a K65 (short-body) keyboard. For those cases, the plate keeps the surface flush while covering the area normally used by the number pad. We are installing a K70 model and will be removing the plate for our configuration.

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In case you're wondering how to remove the various cover plates and mouse pad in order to complete the installation, there is a mini hex driver built-in to the back of the foam lap pad.

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Looking at the bottom of the Lapdog keyboard/mouse housing, we see six magnets that mate with the appropriate places on the bottom of the foam lap pad. The pad is made of cloth covered polyurethane foam. It does not appear to be memory foam and is fairly rigid, which is desirable as we need to keep the keyboard and mouse on a reasonably firm surface when using it on a lap.

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On the right edge of the Lapdog we have rear ports for power and USB 3.0 back to the PC, and on the side, we have another pair of USB 3.0 ports off of the internal powered hub. This lets you do other cool stuff like plugging in portable USB storage or even connecting and charging your phone.

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With the build complete, I'd just like to comment on how seamlessly the corsair keyboards blend with the rest of the Lapdog. The anodized brushed aluminum is a perfect match, though it does add some weight to the completed product. There is a slight lip at the bottom and right edges of the mouse pad which keep it from sliding off when not in use.

Impressions

After setup, I spent some quality time with the Lapdog. In gaming, it definitely works as advertised. With the device on your lap, WASD + mouse gaming is essentially where your hands naturally rest with the default positioning, making gaming just about the same as doing so on a desktop. The lap pad design helps to keep it from sliding around on your lap while in use, and the overall bulk and heft of the unit keep it firmly planted on your lap. It is not overly heavy, and I feel that going any lighter would negatively impact stability.

I also tried some actual writing on the Lapdog (I used it to write this article). While the typical gaming position is natural when centered, the left offset of the keyboard means that any serious typing requires you to scoot everything over to the right. The keyboard side is heavier than the mousing side, so there are no tipping issues when doing so. Even if you were to place the center of the Lapdog over your right leg, centering the keyboard on your lap, its weight will still keep the Lapdog planted on your left, so no issues there. Long periods of typing may put a strain on your back if you tend to lean forward off of the front edge of your couch, but the Lapdog is really meant to be a 'lay back' experience, and extended typing is certainly doable in that position with a bit of practice.

The Corsair Lapdog is available for $119.99, which I feel is a fair price given the high-grade components and solid build quality. If you're into PC gaming from the comfort of your couch, the Corsair Lapdog looks to be the best solution your you!

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Just Delivered: Logitech G900 Chaos Spectrum Wireless Ambidextrous Mouse

Subject: General Tech | March 24, 2016 - 03:00 AM |
Tagged: wireless, mouse, logitech g, logitech, g900, chaos spectrum

While attending GDC last week and catching up on the world of VR that will be in our laps this spring and summer, I spent some time with Logitech to learn about the company's latest in gaming hardware. We already told you about the G610 keyboards using Cherry keyswitches but today Logitech is revealing a brand new wireless gaming mouse. 

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First, I know that a lot of gamers, both those in the professional spaces and those that strive to that level of competition, are going to have concerns about this being a wireless mouse. Logitech believes and has convincing evidence that they have built the best and fastest wireless implementation of any option on the market today. I'll go over some of their testing below, but first let's dive into the mouse itself.

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Much to the delight of left handed users and anyone looking for a ambidextrous mouse, the G900 Chaos Spectrum is built for you! The design is balanced on both sides and even has a unique button configuration to permit thumb use for both lefties and righties. I have been mousing with it for the last three days, and as a right handed user, am completely comfortable with the design. As the name implies, the G logo on the mouse is completely controllable with RGB LEDs through the Logitech Gaming Software suite.

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On the bottom of the G900 you'll find the on/off switch and sync button. Logitech tells us that you will be able to get at least 24 hours of continuous use out of a single charge of the mouse, 32 hours if you turn off lighting, and charge time is going to be around 2 hours. That's actually very good battery life for a high performance sensor like the PMW3366!

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On the front is a micro USB port used for charging, which I'll touch on in a minute. The buttons on the G900 are unique as well, using a new mechanical pivot button design. Logitech claims they were built for "crisp, clean clicks". With the pivot point moved back towards the center of the mouse, engineers were able to reduce the travel distances between the buttons and switches and keep the amount of force required for the click to a minimum. 

Continue reading our first look at the Logitech G900 Chaos Spectrum!!

Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Logitech G

My new desk mate

Earlier this month at the 2016 edition of the Consumer Electronics Show, Logitech released a new product for the gaming market that might have gone unnoticed by some. The G502 Proteus Spectrum is a new gaming mouse that takes an amazing product and makes it just a little better with the help of some RGB goodness. The G502 Proteus Core has been around for a while now and has quickly become one of the best selling gaming mice on Amazon, a testament to its quality and popularity. (It has been as high as #1 overall in recent days.)

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We have been using the G502 Proteus Core in our gaming test beds at the office for some months and during that time I often lamented about how I wanted to upgrade the mouse on my own desk to one. While I waited for myself stop being lazy and not just switching one for the G402 currently in use at my workstation, Logitech released the new G502 Proteus Spectrum and handed me a sample at CES to bring home. Perfect!

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  Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Specifications
Resolution 200 - 12,000 DPI
Max Acceleration >40G
Max Speed >300 IPS
USB Data 16 bits/axis
USB Report Rate 1000 Hz (1 ms)
Processor 32-bit ARM
Button rating 20 million clicks
Feet rating 250 kilometers
Price $79 - Amazon.com

The G502 Proteus Spectrum is very similar to the Core model, with the only difference being the addition of an RGB light under the G logo and DPI resolution indicators. This allows you to use the Logitech Gaming Software to customize its color, its pattern (breathing, still or rotating) as well as pair it up and sync with the RGB lights of other Logitech accessories you might have. If you happen to own a Logitech G910 or G410 keyboard, or one of the new headsets (G633/933) then you'll quickly find yourself in color-coordinated heaven.

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In the box you'll find the mouse, attached to a lengthy cable that works great even with my standing desk, and a set of five weights that you can install on the bottom if you like a heavier feel to your mousing action. I installed as many as I could under the magnetic door on the underside of the mouse and definitely prefer it. The benefit of the weights (as opposed to just a heavier mouse out of the box) is that users can customize it as they see fit.

Continue reading our short review of the Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum mouse!!

Logitech MX Master Mouse Announced

Subject: General Tech | March 27, 2015 - 07:03 AM |
Tagged: mx master, mx, mouse, logitech

In the universe of computer mice, Logitech is one of the best known manufacturers. This one, the Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse, is not part of their “G Series”. At a price of $99.99 USD, or $119.99 CAD, it is their most expensive offering in that class.

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The MX Master is a five button, right handed mouse. While that is not particularly exciting, one interesting feature is the horizontal scrolling tumbler on the thumb rest. The wheel on top scrolls up and down, while the one on the side can scroll left and right (or be reconfigured with Logitech's software). It is also a laser mouse that is capable of tracking on many types of surfaces, including thicker sheets of glass. It can be paired to three separate devices at once, either by Bluetooth or Logitech's proprietary receiver. Its rechargeable battery lasts about 40 days of 6 hour per day usage. Four minutes of charging yields about six hours of usage, and you can apparently even use the mouse while tethered.

The Logitech MX Master will be available in April for $99.99 USD.

Source: Logitech

Logitech Launches G303 Daedalus Apex Gaming Mouse

Subject: General Tech | March 5, 2015 - 04:00 AM |
Tagged: pmw3366, mouse, logitech g, logitech, g303

Here at the tail end of the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, gaming accessory powerhouse Logitech is launching a new mouse in the family of G-series products, the G303 Daedalus Apex. That’s a hell of a name for a mouse to be sure, but the feature set and technology included in this $60 gadget will get some attention from PC gamers and enthusiasts.

Based on the same basic housing and design as the Logitech G302, the G303 is an incredibly lightweight mouse targeted at the gaming community that has such a metric in mind. It includes the same button and spring combinations as the G302, a metal-spring tensioning system, as well as RGB lighting that can be customized with 16.8 million colors.

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The most important new feature of the G303 though is its upgraded optical sensor. Using the Logitech PMW3366, the same sensor found in the Logitech G502, the G303 brings the same level of accuracy and performance to a lighter weight mouse. The technical feature set of the sensor are impressive:

  Logitech PMW3366 Sensor
Sensor Features Exclusive Clock Tuning Technology
Delta Zero™ Technology
Zero Smoothing
Zero Filtering
No Pixel Rounding
No Pixel Doubling
Sensor Surface Tuning
Tracking Resolution: 200 – 12,000 dpi
Max. acceleration: >40G
Max. speed: >300 ips
Responsiveness USB data format: 16 bits/axis
USB report rate: 1000 Hz (1ms)
Microprocessor: 32-bit ARM

Obviously a 12,000 DPI rate is a bit much for any user to really utilize but the capability of the PMW3366 allows it as an option. Other features directly target the gaming market, like Zero Smoothing that guarantees no lag or latency in mousing due to comparisons of sensor data. Clock Tuning is based on Logitech’s inclusion of a crystal that maintains speed and acceleration characteristics despite traditional degradation of these traits over time or due to part-to-part variance. Each G303 should feel the same and the performance should be identical from day one through year one.

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The G303, along with the G502, that utilizes the PMW3366 sensor, can take advantage of Surface Tuning – the ability for the mouse to tune itself to the texture of the plane it’s being used on. By enabling the feature in Logitech’s software then moving the mouse in a series of figure eights, surface-to-surface experiences should be similar.

G303 Daedalus Apex also has advanced Surface Tuning technology as an integral feature of the PMW3366 sensor. Surface Tuning is a technology used to tune mouse parameters to match a surface. Most gaming mice that have “surface tuning” optimize only for lift-off distance by adjusting LED intensity, which can sacrifice maximum speed. G303 Daedalus Apex optimizes the sensor dynamic range to match the properties of your mouse surface for maximum high-speed performance in addition to lower lift-off distance.

The same build quality and software infrastructure that sit behind the G302 and the rest of the Logitech G gaming mice follow to the G303 Daedalus Apex. Buttons rated at 20 million clicks, metal spring tensioning system, intuitive software to manage the DPI presets and 6 programmable buttons along with easy customization of the RGB lighting system create a total package that is beyond the $59 MSRP. As a direct comparison, the G302 will continue to sell for $49 using the older sensor controller while the G502 runs at $69 leaving plenty (maybe too many) options for gamers.

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Logitech sent me at G303 and G502 for testing late last week and I am planning a short story on my experiences. It will be hard to beat the G402 for sheer speed (remember our video review trying to break the accelerometer) but a direct comparison is forthcoming.

Source: Logitech

No one has talked about mouse mats in a while

Subject: General Tech | February 13, 2015 - 05:09 PM |
Tagged: mouse, gaming mat, input, XTracPads, Carbonic, Ripper, Ripport XXL

They are not the most glamorous of peripherals but they do save your desk and can help you with your accuracy, so pop over to Overclockers Club to take a look at XTracPads.  They offer three different sized gaming mats from the paper sized Carbonic at 8.5" x 11" x 1/8" to the Ripper at a larger 11" x 17" x 1/8" to the immense Ripper XXL at 36" x 18" x 1/8" which is going to cover a goodly piece of your desk.  They are priced at roughly $15, $22 and $35 so it is not a major investment to pick up and well worth it if you are looking to replace an old mat which has seen better days.

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"From a casual gamer perspective, I am sure someone who can game competitively will likely notice a greater improvement than I. Personally, I have had trouble with mouse pads that were too hard, not stiff, but solid cutouts of plastic (I don't even know if they are made anymore really). I have also had issues with mouse pads that accumulate a bunch of gross after a bit of use. I can live with poor or cheap mouse pads, but now that I have had a taste of the other side I really don't want to anymore."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Can you really have a wireless gaming mouse?

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2014 - 05:05 PM |
Tagged: input, mouse, wireless gaming mouse, SteelSeries Sensei

Gaming mice have wires as it reduces input lag that would otherwise be the death of you while gaming.  Unfortunately for some this means they cannot sit on the couch streaming YouTube to their TVs since the wire on their mouse just isn't long enough.  SteelSeries claims to have overcome the technical problems of gaming wirelessly with their SteelSeries Sensei.  The software is definitely aimed at gamers, with an impressive array of settings to tweak and an impressive macro editor but that is not enough to solve the performance issues.  Believe it or not when TechGage compared it to a wired mouse they could not detect any difference whatsoever.  I would still recommend wearing pants while frying bacon regardless of your final mouse choice.

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"Want a high-performance wireless gaming mouse that doesn’t have its battery-life measured in seconds? Well, SteelSeries has released its renowned Sensei into the wild, free to run and frolic in grassy meadows, without the need of being tethered to unsightly cables. Does the result live up to our high expectations? There’s only one way to find out."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Techgage
Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Logitech G

Optical + Accelerometer

When I met with Logitech while setting up for our Hardware Workshop at Quakecon this year, they wanted to show me a new mouse they were coming out with. Of course I was interested, but to be honest, mice have seemingly gone to a point where I could very rarely tell them apart in terms of performance. Logitech promised me this would be different. The catch? The G402 Hyperion Fury includes not just an optical sensor but an accelerometer and gyro combo.

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Pretty much all mice today use optical sensors to generate data. The sensors are, basically, taking hundreds or thousands of photos of the surface of your desk or mouse and compare them to each other to measure how far and how fast you have moved your mouse. Your PC then takes that data from the mouse at a USB polling rate, up to 1000 Hz with this mouse, and translates it into mouse movement on your desktop and in games.

There is an issue though - at very high speeds of mouse movement, the optical sensor can fail. It essentially loses track of where it is on the surface and can no longer provide accurate data back to the system. At this point, depending on the design of the mouse and driver, the mouse may just stop sending data all together or just attempt to "guess" for a short period of time. Clearly that's not ideal and means that gamers (or any user for that matter) is getting inaccurate measurements. Boo.

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To be quite honest though, that doesn't happen with modern mice at your standard speeds, or even standard "fast" gaming motions. According to Logitech, the optical sensor will start to lose tracking somewhere in the 150-180 IPS, or inches per second. That's quite a lot. More precisely that is 3.8 meters per second or 8.5 miles per hour. 

Continue reading our overview of the Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury Gaming Mouse!!