Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Tt eSPORTS

Thermaltake brings BMW to the mouse

Our friends at Thermaltake recently sent us a fun new toy, the Tt eSPORTS Level 10 M adjustable gaming mouse.  Yes, that's a lot of letters to describe a mouse, but I can assure you this mouse is unlike any you might have seen before. 

Here are the key selling points:

  • Air-through Ventilation
  • 3D Steering
  • Macro / Lighting software
  • RGB LEDs in several places for customization
  • Laser sensor up to 8300 DPI

The idea of the ventilation is to keep your sweaty hands a bit drier and cooler while the 3D steering allows the user to adjust the mouse surface in two different directions (one for height, one for horizontal angle) to find their preferred placement.  The LEDs do allow for some interesting color combinations as long as you are okay with the preset colors that Tt eSPORTS has available in software.

Speaking of software, the application for customization is a little over exaggerated on the "extreme" design cues but enables the feature set you are looking for.  Custom macros can be created and assigned to one of four buttons (A-D) with adjustments for timing, delay, etc.  In addition, you can combine macros, lighting and DPI settings into one of five profiles that you can switch between easily with the thumb stick on the left side of the mouse. 

Even better - all of this information (macros, profiles) is saved in the mouse after you disconnect it and take it to a different PC - no need to install the software to get the presets you configured before.

After a couple of us have used the mouse for a few days in the office, we put together the video below for you to see our thoughts and opinions as well as how the Level 10 M looks and feels.  Even though it was designed in partnership with BMW, a current selling price of $95 on Newegg makes it hard to recommend the mouse to anyone but those of you that know for sure this is the mouse you want to use going forward. 

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For more photos of the Tt eSPORTS Level 10 M gaming mouse, click here!!

Razer Announces Updated Orochi Mouse For Mobile Gaming

Subject: General Tech | November 27, 2012 - 01:31 PM |
Tagged: razer orochi, razer, PC, mouse, mobile, laptop, gaming

Razer has been on an updating kick this month with a number of its gaming mice being refreshed with better hardware and support for Synapse 2.0 (cloud syncing) software. This time, Razer is turning to its mobile lineup and giving the Orochi an upgrade for a 2013 release.

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The ambidextrous mouse can be used in a wired or wireless configuration. While the original Orochi featured a 4000 DPI laser sensor, the updated model upgrades the sensor to 6400 DPI. Further, Razer has bumped up the Bluetooth radio to one rated at Bluetooth 3.0 specifications. Powered by two AA batteries, Razer has reportedly improved battery life by a significant margin. The company rates the mobile gaming mouse at up to 30 hours of continuous gaming, and three months of normal use.

 

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The refreshed mouse maintains the traditional LED-lit scroll wheel, mouse buttons, and two side buttons of the original Orochi. Interestingly, it comes in a shinier "chrome" colored variant in addition to the standard black blade addition.

The refreshed Orochi 2013 is available for pre-order now for $69.99. According to the Razer website, the blade edition will ship in 1-2 weeks and the chrome variant will ship in a little over a month.

Source: Razer

Razer Refreshes Krait Gaming Mouse With Better Sensor

Subject: General Tech | November 27, 2012 - 09:53 AM |
Tagged: razer, mouse, mice, krait, gaming, 6400 dpi, 4G sensor

Earlier this month Razer announced that it would be updating its DeathAdder gaming mouse with a new sensor and texturized grips. Now, it looks as though the peripheral company is going to be updating its Krait mouse as well.

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The budget gaming mouse will be getting an updated 4G infrared sensor that has a maximum of 6400 DPI resolution for sniping precision. The DPI can be changed on the fly with the Krait as well. Measuring 116mm x 52mm x 36mm and weighing 85 grams, Razer has kept the same overall form factor and design as the original Krait, but has removed the strip of LEDs on the side and replaced them with new texturized rubber grips that are designed to improve grip. Support for Synapse 2.0 is also coming to the new Krait mouse, which will allow you to sync your mouse settings to other computers.

 

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Compared to the original Krait's 1600 DPI, the updated model should bring the classic design into the hands of modern gamers that are used to higher precision mice. At least that's the idea. It will be interesting to see how well received Razer's updated designs will be.

According to EXPreview, the updated Krait will cost 299 Yuan, which works out to just under $50 USD. Unfortunately, there is no word on a specific release date.

Source: EXPreview

Razer Updates Its DeathAdder Mouse With Better Sensor, Texturized Grips

Subject: General Tech | November 24, 2012 - 10:31 AM |
Tagged: synapse 2.0, razer, mouse, gaming mouse, deathadder

Razer recently announced an update to its DeathAdder gaming mouse. Orginally released in 2006, the company is refining the design with a better sensor, improved grips, and support for its latest Synapse software.

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On the outside, Razer has kept the same right-handed optimized design, but it added rubberized side grips with texture that the company believes will improve grip and control. The internals of the mouse have also been updated as Razer has included an improved 4G infrared sensor. According to Razer, the new sensor is capable of 6400 DPI resolution. Other specifications of the sensor include 200 inches per second and 50G acceleration ratings. The new DeathAdder also supports Razer’s new Synapse 2.0 firmware software which allows cloud syncing of your mouse settings.

Razer USA president Robert Krakoff had the following to say abou the updated design:

"We didn't want to fix anything that wasn't broken," said Robert "RazerGuy" Krakoff, president of Razer USA. "We focused instead on enhancing and optimizing the proven merits of the Razer DeathAdder, utilizing next generation technologies and further ergonomics tweaks to make a perfect gaming mouse even better."

Of course, the DeathAdder features five programmable buttons, Razer’s Ultraslick mouse feet, gold-plated USB connector, and a seven foot braided cable.

Dimensions of the updated DeathAdder are 1.27 mm (L) x 70 mm (W) x 1.73 mm (H). Further, it weighs in at 105 grams or approximately 0.23 pounds.

The new version of the DeathAdder is available now worldwide for $69.99 in the US or €69.99 in the EU.

Source: PR Newswire
Manufacturer: PC Perspective

Thoughts about Interface Design in General

I have been in several situations where a variety of people claim the gamepad is superior for gaming because that is what it was designed for. No elaboration or further justification is given. The controller is designed for gaming and is therefore clearly better. End of – despite often being start to – discussion in their minds.

Really it is a compromise between the needs of popular games and the environment of a couch.

Interface design is complicated. When you design an interface you need to consider: the expected types of applications; the environment of the user; what you are permitted to use; what tolerances are allowed; what your audience is used to; and so on, so forth. There is a lot to consider when you design an application for a user and I could make an educated guess that it is at least as hard to design the input device itself.

The history of keyboard design is a great example of tradeoffs in input devices.

Sometimes it is better to be worse...

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The first wave of keyboards were interfaces to the mechanical typewriter. These keyboards were laid out in alphabetical order because as long as each key is accessible and the user could find the letter they wanted – who cares, right? We already have an order for the alphabet that people understands so the users should not have too much difficulty in finding the letter they need.

Another constraint quickly game to light: typists were too fast and the machines jammed.

The engineers now needed to design an input method which could keep up with the typist. Correcting the machine itself was somewhat futile so the solution was to make the typist as slow as possible. The most common letters in the English language were spread all over the place and – while possibly by fluke – the left hand is favored, as in made do more work, over the often dominant right hand.

The problem required making the most aggravating keyboard layout engineers could imagine. QWERTY was born.

What has been designed to threaten QWERTY? Read on to find out.

Razer Launches $129 Ouroboros Gaming Mouse

Subject: General Tech | July 31, 2012 - 04:54 AM |
Tagged: razer ouroboros, razer, mouse, gaming mouse

Gaming peripheral company Razer recently released a new high-end gaming mouse called the Razer Ouroboros. Named after an ancient symbol of a serpent or dragon, the Ouroboros is by no means using outdated technology. For $129 USD or €129.99 in Europe, the Ouroboros offers up wired or wireless connectivity, and a 12 hour battery life in an ambidextrous design. Users can adjust the length of the mouse as well as the angle of the back arch. Additionally, the Ouroboros mouse comes with one of two side panels for each side (four total) that can be switched out to make it right or left handed.

ouroboros-02.png

The new Razer mouse comes from the company's Mamba pedigree. Specifically, it is packing an improved version of the 4G Dual Sensor technology that boasts up to 8,200dpi resolution. In the wireless mode, the Ouroboros features a 1ms response time and a claimed 1000 Hz polling rate. It is powered by a single AA battery that can provide up to 12 hours of use on a single charge for long gaming sessions (general desktop use and standby time should extend the battery life much more). The Ouroboros also includes LED lighting, left and right mouse buttons, a scroll wheel, and dedicated DPI switching buttons. The company's Synapse 2.0 software is also compatible with Razer's new mouse.

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The Ouroboros will be available some time in Q4 2012 for $129.99. Razer has set up a website for more information and photos of the new gaming mouse which you can find at razerzone.com/ouroboros. As a long-time user of the original (pre-dual sensor tech) Mamba, the new Ouroboros looks to be a promising gaming mouse. Just about the only feature it doesn't seem to have is adjustable weights, which always seemed like a neat feature to have.

Is it worth $129? It's hard to say without getting my hands on it in person, but it certainly looks good! What do you think?

Source: Razer

A capacitor powered mouse from Genius

Subject: General Tech | June 11, 2012 - 03:48 PM |
Tagged: input, mouse, Genius DX-ECO

Why would you want a wireless mouse which has abandoned batteries and instead uses a large capacitor?  Apart from the obvious environmental benefit of never tossing out drained batteries, how does a charging time of 3 minutes for an 4 hour charge sound?  Bjorn3D also reports that the capacitor will have an expected lifespan of 100,000 charges which ought to last you until we have a new way of interfacing with our PCs.  It uses BlueEye technology to ensure that your cursor will properly track across any surface.  Bjorn3D was a little disappointed that there was only 2 DPI modes but that will not matter to the mobile office user.

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"Have you ever considered the environmental waste from all of the disposable batteries you throw away from your wireless mouse? The DX-ECO from Genius has an ingenious solution to this problem. The DX-ECO uses capacitors as opposed to conventional batteries to store a charge. This makes the mouse extremely light and have a recharging time of only 4 minutes."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Bjorn3D

How many mechanical switches before a mouse starts becoming a keybaord?

Subject: General Tech | April 23, 2012 - 04:20 PM |
Tagged: input, mouse, gaming mouse, razer, Naga Hex Expert, mechanical keyboard

Not content with simply having 11 programmable buttons, the 6 removable thumb buttons on the Razer Naga Hex Expert gaming mouse use mechanical switches.  That is not just a marketing ploy however, this will allow very quick response from the buttons as well as giving them a longer life than less rugged choices.  Also included with this mouse is support for Synapse 2.0, the updated Razer mouse driver which Mad Shrimps found quite easy to use

If you prefer your mechanical keys on a keyboard then check out what Scott has been up to.

MadshrimpNAGA.jpg

"The new mouse from the Naga family is Hex and Razer has built it for MOBA and Action RPGs; it comes with 6 extra buttons on the thumb side and 3 different rubber thumb rests are also provided, to suit our needs. The customization of the mouse functions can be realized by using the powerful Razer Synapse 2.0 software, which can be downloaded freely from the manufacturers’ website."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Mad Shrimps

Just Delivered: Corsair Vengeance K90, K60, M90, M60 Keyboards and Mice

Subject: General Tech | February 24, 2012 - 06:46 PM |
Tagged: vengeance, mouse, m90, m60, keyboard, k90, k60, just delivered, hid, corsair

Just Delivered is a section of PC Perspective where we share some of the goodies that pass through our labs that may or may not see a review, but are pretty cool none the less.

Corsair does just about everything now - memory modules, power supplies, cases, SSDs, headphones, speakers, water coolers, functional LED umbrellas and now keyboards and mice.  And just like we have seen when Corsair entered new markets previously, they took their time to do it right.  The Vengeance line of keyboards and mice offer two dedicated series for gamers of different persuasions: the K90 and M90 for MMO players and the K60 and M60 for predominantly FPS users.

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The new keyboards consist MOSTLY of Cherry MX Red switches (which you can read more about here in our recent Rosewill keyboard roundup) and are generally very well built.  The mice have adjustable DPIs, lights and lots of button.  What follows is a pictorial preview of these gorgeous devices before our review sometime in the near future!  Enjoy!!

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The K60 comes with a removable left hand rest for your frequent gaming as well as replaceable WASD keys that have a rubber texture to them and are slightly angled to keep your fingers from slipping out during those INTENSE gaming moments.

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Corsair tends to think of the customer first so they were sure to include a tool to remove the keys rather than telling you to use a flat head screwdriver from your garage.

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One of my favorite features is the Windows button disable key up there to prevent you from accidently hitting that during gameplay.

See a lot more photos of these devices in our full post!!

Source: Corsair

Razer Shows Gaming Laptop, Prototype Gaming Tablet and More at CES

Subject: Mobile | January 11, 2012 - 05:02 PM |
Tagged: tablet, razer, mouse, laptop, keyboard, gaming, CES

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Gaming peripheral company Razer is already well known for its gaming mice, keyboards, headsets and other gadgets. But if CES 2012 is any indication, they’re far from content making products that go along with gaming devices.

You’ve probably already heard of the Project Fiona gaming tablet. It made quite a splash at CES when it was announced last night, and today I had a chance to inspect it up close and personal. 

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Unfortunately they’re keeping the prototype in a glass case to protect it, but handling it would not reveal much information anyway. Razer has made it clear that the device is only a prototype and will be revised significantly before release. Everything from the display resolution to the controllers could change, and the company is encouraging feedback to help them refine the final concept. 

The only thing that seems concrete is the pricing. Razer is very confident that the final product will be sold for under $1000. I doubt it will provide amazing hardware at that price, but this was never going to be the system of choice for playing Battlefield 3 regardless of what’s inside. The finalized version of Project Fiona is targeted for release this year.

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Another system being built by Razer is the Blade laptop, a product that was announced several months ago but is now finalized and should be on store shelves in February. The Blade is a thin and portable 17-inch laptop built for mobile gaming. Despite the large display it weighs about 6.5 pounds and is less than an inch thick. 

Unlike a normal laptop, the blade doesn’t have a touchpad below the keyboard. Instead the Blade replaces the numpad with a multi-touch display and ten programmable LCD keys. Mouse navigation takes place using the multi-touch display, but if you’d like it can also be used for other tasks including web browsing and recording macros. Razer is also working with game developers to make it possible for games to display customized information and controls.

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The Blade comes equipped with a Core i7 dual-core processor, Nvidia GeForce GT555M graphics and 8GB of RAM. These specifications are disappointing in light of the $2799 price tag. Razer tried to play down the hardware, insisting that hardcore gamers looking for a mobile machine will be more concerned with the laptop’s portability and customizable mutli-touch display than raw power. 

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Also shown was a full set of new Star Wars: The Old Republic peripherals. Of these the most notable is the keyboard, which features Star Wars design ques and a multi-touch display identical to the one on the Razer Blade laptop. Players will be able to bind abilities to the customizable LCD keys and see game information via the display. There’s a lot of possibility here, but it doesn’t come cheap – you’ll have to part with $249 to snag this keyboard.

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Last is Razer’s new Hex mouse. It is similar to the Razer Naga, but six larger buttons in a hex format have replaced the columns of programmable buttons. Razer says that this design works better with action-RPGs and specifically referenced Diablo 3 as a game they had in mind when designing the mouse. The Hex will use Synapse 2.0, Razer’s cloud device profile service. An unlimited number of custom profiles can be stored on remote servers (hosted by Amazon) and they are automatically downloaded to the Hex when it is plugged in to a new computer. Pricing is set at $79.99 with availability expected in February. 

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Razer