Just Delivered: Logitech G900 Chaos Spectrum Wireless Ambidextrous Mouse

Subject: General Tech | March 24, 2016 - 07:00 AM |
Tagged: wireless, mouse, logitech g, logitech, g900, chaos spectrum

While attending GDC last week and catching up on the world of VR that will be in our laps this spring and summer, I spent some time with Logitech to learn about the company's latest in gaming hardware. We already told you about the G610 keyboards using Cherry keyswitches but today Logitech is revealing a brand new wireless gaming mouse. 

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First, I know that a lot of gamers, both those in the professional spaces and those that strive to that level of competition, are going to have concerns about this being a wireless mouse. Logitech believes and has convincing evidence that they have built the best and fastest wireless implementation of any option on the market today. I'll go over some of their testing below, but first let's dive into the mouse itself.

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Much to the delight of left handed users and anyone looking for a ambidextrous mouse, the G900 Chaos Spectrum is built for you! The design is balanced on both sides and even has a unique button configuration to permit thumb use for both lefties and righties. I have been mousing with it for the last three days, and as a right handed user, am completely comfortable with the design. As the name implies, the G logo on the mouse is completely controllable with RGB LEDs through the Logitech Gaming Software suite.

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On the bottom of the G900 you'll find the on/off switch and sync button. Logitech tells us that you will be able to get at least 24 hours of continuous use out of a single charge of the mouse, 32 hours if you turn off lighting, and charge time is going to be around 2 hours. That's actually very good battery life for a high performance sensor like the PMW3366!

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On the front is a micro USB port used for charging, which I'll touch on in a minute. The buttons on the G900 are unique as well, using a new mechanical pivot button design. Logitech claims they were built for "crisp, clean clicks". With the pivot point moved back towards the center of the mouse, engineers were able to reduce the travel distances between the buttons and switches and keep the amount of force required for the click to a minimum. 

Continue reading our first look at the Logitech G900 Chaos Spectrum!!

Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Logitech G

My new desk mate

Earlier this month at the 2016 edition of the Consumer Electronics Show, Logitech released a new product for the gaming market that might have gone unnoticed by some. The G502 Proteus Spectrum is a new gaming mouse that takes an amazing product and makes it just a little better with the help of some RGB goodness. The G502 Proteus Core has been around for a while now and has quickly become one of the best selling gaming mice on Amazon, a testament to its quality and popularity. (It has been as high as #1 overall in recent days.)

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We have been using the G502 Proteus Core in our gaming test beds at the office for some months and during that time I often lamented about how I wanted to upgrade the mouse on my own desk to one. While I waited for myself stop being lazy and not just switching one for the G402 currently in use at my workstation, Logitech released the new G502 Proteus Spectrum and handed me a sample at CES to bring home. Perfect!

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  Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Specifications
Resolution 200 - 12,000 DPI
Max Acceleration >40G
Max Speed >300 IPS
USB Data 16 bits/axis
USB Report Rate 1000 Hz (1 ms)
Processor 32-bit ARM
Button rating 20 million clicks
Feet rating 250 kilometers
Price $79 - Amazon.com

The G502 Proteus Spectrum is very similar to the Core model, with the only difference being the addition of an RGB light under the G logo and DPI resolution indicators. This allows you to use the Logitech Gaming Software to customize its color, its pattern (breathing, still or rotating) as well as pair it up and sync with the RGB lights of other Logitech accessories you might have. If you happen to own a Logitech G910 or G410 keyboard, or one of the new headsets (G633/933) then you'll quickly find yourself in color-coordinated heaven.

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In the box you'll find the mouse, attached to a lengthy cable that works great even with my standing desk, and a set of five weights that you can install on the bottom if you like a heavier feel to your mousing action. I installed as many as I could under the magnetic door on the underside of the mouse and definitely prefer it. The benefit of the weights (as opposed to just a heavier mouse out of the box) is that users can customize it as they see fit.

Continue reading our short review of the Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum mouse!!

Logitech MX Master Mouse Announced

Subject: General Tech | March 27, 2015 - 11:03 AM |
Tagged: mx master, mx, mouse, logitech

In the universe of computer mice, Logitech is one of the best known manufacturers. This one, the Logitech MX Master Wireless Mouse, is not part of their “G Series”. At a price of $99.99 USD, or $119.99 CAD, it is their most expensive offering in that class.

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The MX Master is a five button, right handed mouse. While that is not particularly exciting, one interesting feature is the horizontal scrolling tumbler on the thumb rest. The wheel on top scrolls up and down, while the one on the side can scroll left and right (or be reconfigured with Logitech's software). It is also a laser mouse that is capable of tracking on many types of surfaces, including thicker sheets of glass. It can be paired to three separate devices at once, either by Bluetooth or Logitech's proprietary receiver. Its rechargeable battery lasts about 40 days of 6 hour per day usage. Four minutes of charging yields about six hours of usage, and you can apparently even use the mouse while tethered.

The Logitech MX Master will be available in April for $99.99 USD.

Source: Logitech

Logitech Launches G303 Daedalus Apex Gaming Mouse

Subject: General Tech | March 5, 2015 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: pmw3366, mouse, logitech g, logitech, g303

Here at the tail end of the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco, gaming accessory powerhouse Logitech is launching a new mouse in the family of G-series products, the G303 Daedalus Apex. That’s a hell of a name for a mouse to be sure, but the feature set and technology included in this $60 gadget will get some attention from PC gamers and enthusiasts.

Based on the same basic housing and design as the Logitech G302, the G303 is an incredibly lightweight mouse targeted at the gaming community that has such a metric in mind. It includes the same button and spring combinations as the G302, a metal-spring tensioning system, as well as RGB lighting that can be customized with 16.8 million colors.

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The most important new feature of the G303 though is its upgraded optical sensor. Using the Logitech PMW3366, the same sensor found in the Logitech G502, the G303 brings the same level of accuracy and performance to a lighter weight mouse. The technical feature set of the sensor are impressive:

  Logitech PMW3366 Sensor
Sensor Features Exclusive Clock Tuning Technology
Delta Zero™ Technology
Zero Smoothing
Zero Filtering
No Pixel Rounding
No Pixel Doubling
Sensor Surface Tuning
Tracking Resolution: 200 – 12,000 dpi
Max. acceleration: >40G
Max. speed: >300 ips
Responsiveness USB data format: 16 bits/axis
USB report rate: 1000 Hz (1ms)
Microprocessor: 32-bit ARM

Obviously a 12,000 DPI rate is a bit much for any user to really utilize but the capability of the PMW3366 allows it as an option. Other features directly target the gaming market, like Zero Smoothing that guarantees no lag or latency in mousing due to comparisons of sensor data. Clock Tuning is based on Logitech’s inclusion of a crystal that maintains speed and acceleration characteristics despite traditional degradation of these traits over time or due to part-to-part variance. Each G303 should feel the same and the performance should be identical from day one through year one.

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The G303, along with the G502, that utilizes the PMW3366 sensor, can take advantage of Surface Tuning – the ability for the mouse to tune itself to the texture of the plane it’s being used on. By enabling the feature in Logitech’s software then moving the mouse in a series of figure eights, surface-to-surface experiences should be similar.

G303 Daedalus Apex also has advanced Surface Tuning technology as an integral feature of the PMW3366 sensor. Surface Tuning is a technology used to tune mouse parameters to match a surface. Most gaming mice that have “surface tuning” optimize only for lift-off distance by adjusting LED intensity, which can sacrifice maximum speed. G303 Daedalus Apex optimizes the sensor dynamic range to match the properties of your mouse surface for maximum high-speed performance in addition to lower lift-off distance.

The same build quality and software infrastructure that sit behind the G302 and the rest of the Logitech G gaming mice follow to the G303 Daedalus Apex. Buttons rated at 20 million clicks, metal spring tensioning system, intuitive software to manage the DPI presets and 6 programmable buttons along with easy customization of the RGB lighting system create a total package that is beyond the $59 MSRP. As a direct comparison, the G302 will continue to sell for $49 using the older sensor controller while the G502 runs at $69 leaving plenty (maybe too many) options for gamers.

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Logitech sent me at G303 and G502 for testing late last week and I am planning a short story on my experiences. It will be hard to beat the G402 for sheer speed (remember our video review trying to break the accelerometer) but a direct comparison is forthcoming.

Source: Logitech

No one has talked about mouse mats in a while

Subject: General Tech | February 13, 2015 - 10:09 PM |
Tagged: mouse, gaming mat, input, XTracPads, Carbonic, Ripper, Ripport XXL

They are not the most glamorous of peripherals but they do save your desk and can help you with your accuracy, so pop over to Overclockers Club to take a look at XTracPads.  They offer three different sized gaming mats from the paper sized Carbonic at 8.5" x 11" x 1/8" to the Ripper at a larger 11" x 17" x 1/8" to the immense Ripper XXL at 36" x 18" x 1/8" which is going to cover a goodly piece of your desk.  They are priced at roughly $15, $22 and $35 so it is not a major investment to pick up and well worth it if you are looking to replace an old mat which has seen better days.

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"From a casual gamer perspective, I am sure someone who can game competitively will likely notice a greater improvement than I. Personally, I have had trouble with mouse pads that were too hard, not stiff, but solid cutouts of plastic (I don't even know if they are made anymore really). I have also had issues with mouse pads that accumulate a bunch of gross after a bit of use. I can live with poor or cheap mouse pads, but now that I have had a taste of the other side I really don't want to anymore."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Can you really have a wireless gaming mouse?

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2014 - 09:05 PM |
Tagged: input, mouse, wireless gaming mouse, SteelSeries Sensei

Gaming mice have wires as it reduces input lag that would otherwise be the death of you while gaming.  Unfortunately for some this means they cannot sit on the couch streaming YouTube to their TVs since the wire on their mouse just isn't long enough.  SteelSeries claims to have overcome the technical problems of gaming wirelessly with their SteelSeries Sensei.  The software is definitely aimed at gamers, with an impressive array of settings to tweak and an impressive macro editor but that is not enough to solve the performance issues.  Believe it or not when TechGage compared it to a wired mouse they could not detect any difference whatsoever.  I would still recommend wearing pants while frying bacon regardless of your final mouse choice.

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"Want a high-performance wireless gaming mouse that doesn’t have its battery-life measured in seconds? Well, SteelSeries has released its renowned Sensei into the wild, free to run and frolic in grassy meadows, without the need of being tethered to unsightly cables. Does the result live up to our high expectations? There’s only one way to find out."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Techgage
Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Logitech G

Optical + Accelerometer

When I met with Logitech while setting up for our Hardware Workshop at Quakecon this year, they wanted to show me a new mouse they were coming out with. Of course I was interested, but to be honest, mice have seemingly gone to a point where I could very rarely tell them apart in terms of performance. Logitech promised me this would be different. The catch? The G402 Hyperion Fury includes not just an optical sensor but an accelerometer and gyro combo.

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Pretty much all mice today use optical sensors to generate data. The sensors are, basically, taking hundreds or thousands of photos of the surface of your desk or mouse and compare them to each other to measure how far and how fast you have moved your mouse. Your PC then takes that data from the mouse at a USB polling rate, up to 1000 Hz with this mouse, and translates it into mouse movement on your desktop and in games.

There is an issue though - at very high speeds of mouse movement, the optical sensor can fail. It essentially loses track of where it is on the surface and can no longer provide accurate data back to the system. At this point, depending on the design of the mouse and driver, the mouse may just stop sending data all together or just attempt to "guess" for a short period of time. Clearly that's not ideal and means that gamers (or any user for that matter) is getting inaccurate measurements. Boo.

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To be quite honest though, that doesn't happen with modern mice at your standard speeds, or even standard "fast" gaming motions. According to Logitech, the optical sensor will start to lose tracking somewhere in the 150-180 IPS, or inches per second. That's quite a lot. More precisely that is 3.8 meters per second or 8.5 miles per hour. 

Continue reading our overview of the Logitech G402 Hyperion Fury Gaming Mouse!!

Manufacturer: EVGA

Introduction, Hardware, and Subjective Feel

This review comes before the end of the pre-order period. The reason why I targeted that deadline is because the pre-order perks are quite significant. First, either version of the mouse is listed for about $50 off of its MSRP (which is half price for the plastic version). EVGA also throws in a mouse pad for registering your purchase. The plastic mouse is $49.99 during its pre-order period ($99.99 MSRP) and its carbon fiber alternative is $79.99 ($129.99 MSRP). EVGA has supplied us with the plastic version for review.

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Being left-handed really puts a damper on my choice of gaming mice. If the peripheral is designed to contain thumb buttons, it needs to either be symmetric (because a right hand's thumb buttons would be controlled by my pinky or ring finger) or be an ergonomic, curved mouse which comes in a special version for lefties that is mirrored horizontally (which is an obvious risk, especially when the market of left-handed gamers is further split by those who learned to force themselves to use right-handed mice).

Please read on to see my thoughts on the EVGA Torq X10

Just Delivered: EVGA Torq X10 Gaming Mouse

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | May 27, 2014 - 04:19 AM |
Tagged: mouse, laser mouse, gaming mouse, evga

It has been a while since I reviewed hardware and, when I did, they were all keyboards. Being a southpaw, it is fairly difficult to review higher-end mice. When offered to review the EVGA Torq X10 Gaming Mouse, I noticed that it is a (nearly) symmetric design with nine (9) buttons: five (5) on the top, two (2) on the left for right-handed thumbs, and two (2) more, identical buttons on the right for left-handed thumbs.

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Of course, the off-hand buttons can still be used for time-insensitive commands, like pinging the map of a strategy game. Personally, I tend to rebind mouse sensitivity to the pinky-buttons and rebind what is usually meant for DPI adjustments to pinging maps or, on games like Battlefield: Bad Company 2, fly up and down (for the UAV).

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A quick unboxing shows the underside of the mouse, an accessory pouch made out of paper with a getting started guide and what looks to be sticker-based grips, a plastic bag of weights, and that metal thing beside the mouse is a torx screwdriver. This screwdriver is what will be used to customize the palm angle by turning its adjustment at the rear of the mouse.

While I have not yet plugged it in, I did play around with its grip adjustment. You probably will not notice its effects unless you are looking for it, but it does result in significant changes to the touch. I will discuss this, and its other features, more in my upcoming full review.

As for pricing, EVGA is currently accepting pre-orders through Newegg. The base version is available for $49.99 (pre-order price, $99.99 MSRP) with a "carbon fiber" version, an identical mouse outside of the surface material, also on pre-order for $69.99 (pre-order price, $129.99 MSRP). It is unclear whether they will ever make it up to their MSRP but, if they do, an almost half-price pre-order (with a free mouse pad if you pre-order, register your mouse, and upload your invoice, apparently) is pretty gigantic.

It is expected to ship in a month (late June). I hope to have at least a preliminary review, if not a full one, up with time left for pre-orders.

Source: EVGA

Faith in Humanity Declining: Camera Mice.

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | January 19, 2014 - 01:44 AM |
Tagged: camera, mouse, camera mouse, Japan

Have you ever been sitting at your laptop or desktop thinking, "I really need a selfie right about now and this webcam simply will not do"? I have no idea what is wrong with you. Do you not have a cellphone if spontaneous self-photography means that much?

But at least a Japanese company has your back... or is it front?

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For the love of... it's even being held the wrong way!!!

Introducing the Camera Mouse. It is a mouse with a camera in it. It is useful if you want to take pictures of things with your mouse. It will be sold by King Jim Co., LTD. which is one of the largest office supplies manufacturers in Japan.

While I have been thinking about this news story, I have been thinking about legitimate use cases. It has been a struggle. I just cannot understand why someone would want to purchase a 1600x1200 camera which is hard-wired to their computer. Thus far, I have only come up with a single possibilities (although it would require significant software development resources that I doubt they intend to provide). The only way I could see myself purchasing this mouse is if it came with OCR and translation software so that I could point it at my monitor and automatically translate any text on screen.

Even then, I expect the vast majority of foreign language content would be in a web browser and two of those automatically translate text anyway. It would help for text in images or text in videos but otherwise I could not see the point even then. Moreover, all of this assumes the software even exists in a reasonable package (Bluestacks running Google Translate is probably no more useful than a cell phone).

But who knows. I could be missing the bigger picture. I could be missing the subtle nuances of their target audience. Maybe I just need to see things at two megapixels from under a sweaty palm.

Source: King Jim