NVIDIA Preparing GeForce 800M (Laptop) Maxwell GPUs?

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Mobile | July 19, 2014 - 03:29 AM |
Tagged: nvidia, geforce, maxwell, mobile gpu, mobile graphics

Apparently, some hardware sites got their hands on an NVIDIA driver listing with several new product codes. They claim thirteen N16(P/E) chips are listed (although I count twelve (??)). While I do not have much knowledge of NVIDIA's internal product structure, the GeForce GTX 880M, based on Kepler, is apparently listed as N15E.

nvidiamaxwellroadmap.jpg

Things have changed a lot since this presentation.

These new parts will allegedly be based on the second-generation Maxwell architecture. Also, the source believes that these new GPUs will in the GeForce GTX 800-series, possibly with the MX suffix that was last seen in October 2012 with the GeForce GTX 680MX. Of course, being a long-time PC gamer, the MX suffix does not exactly ring positive with my memory. It used to be the Ti-line that you wanted, and the MX-line that you could afford. But who am I kidding? None of that is relevant these days. Get off my lawn.

Source: Videocardz

Connecting Pascal's triangle with the Maxwell Equations

Subject: General Tech | March 27, 2014 - 01:10 PM |
Tagged: pascal, nvlink, nvidia, maxwell, jen-hsun huang, GTC

Before we get to see Volta in action NVIDIA is taking a half step and releasing the Pascal architecture which will use Maxwell-like Streaming Multiprocessors and will introduce stacked or 3D memory which will reside on the same substrate as the GPU.  Jen-Hsun claimed this new type of memory will vastly increase the bandwidth available, provide two and a half times the capacity and be four times as energy efficient at the same time.  Along with the 3D memory announcement was the revealing of NVLink, an alternative interconnect which he claims will offer 5-12 times the bandwidth of PCIe and will be utilized by HPC systems.  From his announcement that NVLink will feature eight 20Gbps lanes per block or as NVIDIA is calling them, bricks, which The Tech Report used to make a quick calculation and came up with an aggregate bandwidth of a brick of around 20GB/s.  Read on to see what else was revealed.

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"Today during his opening keynote at the Nvidia GPU Technology Conference, CEO Jen-Hsun Huang offered an update to Nvidia's GPU roadmap. The big reveal was about a GPU code-named Pascal, which will be a generation beyond the still-being-introduced Maxwell architecture in the firm's plans."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Author:
Manufacturer: Various

EVGA GTX 750 Ti ACX FTW

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti has been getting a lot of attention around the hardware circuits recently, but for good reason.  It remains interesting from a technology stand point as it is the first, and still the only, Maxwell based GPU available for desktop users.  It's a completely new architecture which is built with power efficiency (and Tegra) in mind. With it, the GTX 750 Ti was able to push a lot of performance into a very small power envelope while still maintaining some very high clock speeds.

IMG_9872.JPG

NVIDIA’s flagship mainstream part is also still the leader when it comes to performance per dollar in this segment (for at least as long as it takes for AMD’s Radeon R7 265 to become widely available).  There has been a few cases that we have noticed where the long standing shortages and price hikes from coin mining have dwindled, which is great news for gamers but may also be bad news for NVIDIA’s GPUs in some areas.  Though, even if the R7 265 becomes available, the GTX 750 Ti remains the best card you can buy that doesn’t require a power connection. This puts it in a unique position for power limited upgrades. 

After our initial review of the reference card, and then an interesting look at how the card can be used to upgrade an older or under powered PC, it is time to take a quick look at a set of three different retail cards that have made their way into the PC Perspective offices.

On the chopping block today we’ll look at the EVGA GeForce GTX 750 Ti ACX FTW, the Galaxy GTX 750 Ti GC and the PNY GTX 750 Ti XLR8 OC.  All of them are non-reference, all of them are overclocked, but you’ll likely be surprised how they stack up.

Continue reading our round up of EVGA, Galaxy and PNY GTX 750 Ti Graphics Cards!!

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Maxwell and Kepler and...Fermi?

Covering the landscape of mobile GPUs can be a harrowing experience.  Brands, specifications, performance, features and architectures can all vary from product to product, even inside the same family.  Rebranding is rampant from both AMD and NVIDIA and, in general, we are met with one of the most confusing segments of the PC hardware market.  

Today, with the release of the GeForce GTX 800M series from NVIDIA, we are getting all of the above in one form or another. We will also see performance improvements and the introduction of the new Maxwell architecture (in a few parts at least).  Along with the GeForce GTX 800M parts, you will also find the GeForce 840M, 830M and 820M offerings at lower performance, wattage and price levels.

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With some new hardware comes a collection of new software for mobile users, including the innovative Battery Boost that can increase unplugged gaming time by using frame rate limiting and other "magic" bits that NVIDIA isn't talking about yet.  ShadowPlay and GameStream also find their way to mobile GeForce users as well.

Let's take a quick look at the new hardware specifications.

  GTX 880M GTX 780M GTX 870M GTX 770M
GPU Code name Kepler Kepler Kepler Kepler
GPU Cores 1536 1536 1344 960
Rated Clock 954 MHz 823 MHz 941 MHz 811 MHz
Memory Up to 4GB Up to 4GB Up to 3GB Up to 3GB
Memory Clock 5000 MHz 5000 MHz 5000 MHz 4000 MHz
Memory Interface 256-bit 256-bit 192-bit 192-bit
Features Battery Boost
GameStream
ShadowPlay
GFE
GameStream
ShadowPlay
GFE
Battery Boost
GameStream
ShadowPlay
GFE
GameStream
ShadowPlay
GFE

Both the GTX 880M and the GTX 870M are based on Kepler, keeping the same basic feature set and hardware specifications of their brethren in the GTX 700M line.  However, while the GTX 880M has the same CUDA core count as the 780M, the same cannot be said of the GTX 870M.  Moving from the GTX 770M to the 870M sees a significant 40% increase in core count as well as a jump in clock speed from 811 MHz (plus Boost) to 941 MHz.  

Continue reading about the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 800M Launch and Battery Boost!!

EVGA Launches GTX 750 and GTX 750 SC With 2GB GDDR5

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 3, 2014 - 10:33 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, maxwell, gtx 750, evga

EVGA recently launched two new GTX 750 graphics cards with 2GB of GDDR5 memory. The new cards include a reference clocked GTX 750 2GB and a factory overclocked GTX 750 2GB SC (Super Clocked).

EVGA GTX 750 2GB GDDR5 GPU.jpg

The new graphics cards are based around NVIDIA’s GTX 750 GPU with 512 Maxwell architecture CUDA cores. The GTX 750 is the little brother to the GTX 750 Ti we recently reviewed which has 640 cores. EVGA has clocked the GTX 750 2GB card’s GPU at reference clockspeeds of 1020 MHz base and 1085 MHz boost and memory at a reference speed of 1253 MHz. The “Super Clocked” GTX 750 2GB SC card keeps the memory at reference speeds but overclocks the GPU quite a bit to 1215 MHz base and 1294 MHz boost.

  EVGA GTX 750 2GB EVGA GTX 750 2GB Super Clocked
GPU 512 CUDA Cores (Maxwell) 512 CUDA Cores (Maxwell)
-    GPU Base 1020 MHz 1215 MHz
-    GPU Boost 1085 MHz 1294 MHz
Memory 2 GB GDDR5 @ 1253 MHz on 128-bit bus
I/O
1 x DVI, 1 x HDMI, 1 x DP
TDP 55W 55W
Price $129.99 $139.99

Both cards have a 55W TDP sans any PCI-E power connector and utilize a single shrouded fan heatsink. The cards are short but occupy two PCI slots. The rear panel hosts one DVI, one HDMI, and one DisplayPort video output along with ventilation slots for the HSF. Further, the cards both support NVIDIA’s G-Sync technology.

EVGA GTX 750 2GB GDDR5 SC.jpg

The reference clocked GTX 750 2GB is $129.99 while the factory overclocked model is $139.99. Both cards are similar to their respective predecessors except for the additional 1GB of GDDR5 memory which comes at a $10 premium and should will help a bit at high resolutions.

Source: EVGA

Speaking of Passive Cooling: Tom's Hardware's GTX 750 Ti

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | March 2, 2014 - 05:20 PM |
Tagged: passive cooling, maxwell, gtx 750 ti

The NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti is fast but also power efficient, enough-so that Ryan found it a worthwhile upgrade for cheap desktops with cheap power supplies that were never intended for discrete graphics. Of course, this recommendation is about making the best of what you got; better options probably exist if you are building a PC (or getting one built by a friend or a computer store).

toms-passive-geforce-gtx-750-ti-cooling,O-U-423390-22.jpg

Image Credit: Tom's Hardware

Tom's Hardware went another route: make it fanless.

After wrecking a passively-cooled Radeon HD 7750, which is probably a crime in Texas, they clamped it on to the Maxwell-based GTX 750 Ti. While the cooler was designed for good airflow, they decided to leave it in a completely-enclosed case without fans. Under load, the card reached 80 C within about twenty minutes. The driver backed off performance slightly, 1-3% depending on your frame of reference, but was able to maintain that target temperature.

Now, if only it accepted SLi, this person might be happy.

NVIDIA Coin Mining Performance Increases with Maxwell and GTX 750 Ti

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | February 20, 2014 - 05:45 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, mining, maxwell, litecoin, gtx 750 ti, geforce, dogecoin, coin, bitcoin, altcoin

As we have talked about on several different occasions, Altcoin mining (anything that is NOT Bitcoin specifically) is a force on the current GPU market whether we like it or not. Traditionally, Miners have only bought AMD-based GPUs, due to the performance advantage when compared to their NVIDIA competition. However, with continued development of the cudaMiner application over the past few months, NVIDIA cards have been gaining performance in Scrypt mining.

The biggest performance change we've seen yet has come with a new version of cudaMiner released yesterday. This new version (2014-02-18) brings initial support for the Maxwell architecture, which was just released yesterday in the GTX 750 and 750 Ti. With support for Maxwell, mining starts to become a more compelling option with this new NVIDIA GPU.

With the new version of cudaMiner on the reference version of the GTX 750 Ti, we were able to achieve a hashrate of 263 KH/s, impressive when you compare it to the performance of the previous generation, Kepler-based GTX 650 Ti, which tops out at about 150KH/s or so.

IMG_9552.JPG

As you may know from our full GTX 750 Ti Review,  the GM107 overclocks very well. We were able to push our sample to the highest offset configurable of +135 MHz, with an additional 500 MHz added to the memory frequency, and 31 mV bump to the voltage offset. All of this combined to a ~1200 MHz clockspeed while mining, and an additional 40 KH/s or so of performance, bringing us to just under 300KH/s with the 750 Ti.

perf.png

As we compare the performance of the 750 Ti to AMD GPUs and previous generation NVIDIA GPUs, we start to see how impressive the performance of this card stacks up considering the $150 MSRP. For less than half the price of the GTX 770, and roughly the same price as a R7 260X, you can achieve the same performance.

power.png

When we look at power consumption based on the TDP of each card, this comparison only becomes more impressive. At 60W, there is no card that comes close to the performance of the 750 Ti when mining. This means you will spend less to run a 750 Ti than a R7 260X or GTX 770 for roughly the same hash rate.

perfdollar.png

Taking a look at the performance per dollar ratings of these graphics cards, we see the two top performers are the AMD R7 260X and our overclocked GTX 750 Ti.

perfpower.png

However, when looking at the performance per watt differences of the field, the GTX 750 Ti looks more impressive. While most miners may think they don't care about power draw, it can help your bottom line. By being able to buy a smaller, less efficient power supply the payoff date for the hardware is moved up.  This also bodes well for future Maxwell based graphics cards that we will likely see released later in 2014.  

Continue reading our look at Coin Mining performance with the GTX 750 Ti and Maxwell!!

Podcast #288 - NVIDIA GTX 750 Ti, Upgrading Crappy Desktops, 5TB Hard Drives and more!

Subject: General Tech | February 20, 2014 - 02:17 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, toshiba, raptr, R9 290X, r9 290, pcper, OEM, maxwell, gtx 750 ti, desktop pc, 750 ti, 5TB

PC Perspective Podcast #288 - 02/20/2014

Join us this week as we discuss the release of the NVIDIA GTX 750 Ti, Upgrading Crappy Desktops, 5TB Hard Drives and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath and Allyn Malventano

 
Program length: 1:13:15
 
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
    1. Allyn: Got Descent? Great! Now run it in high res (D1X Rebirth).
  4. Closing/outro

Be sure to subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube channel!!

 

Was leading with a low end Maxwell smart?

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 19, 2014 - 04:43 PM |
Tagged: geforce, gm107, gpu, graphics, gtx 750 ti, maxwell, nvidia, video

We finally saw Maxwell yesterday, with a new design for the SMs called SMM each of which consist of four blocks of 32 dedicated, non-shared CUDA cores.  In theory that should allow NVIDIA to pack more SMMs onto the card than they could with the previous SMK units.  This new design was released on a $150 card which means we don't really get to see what this new design is capable of yet.  At that price it competes with AMD's R7 260X and R7 265, at least if you can find them at their MSRP and not at inflated cryptocurrency levels.  Legit Reviews contrasted the performance of two overclocked GTX 750 Ti to those two cards as well as to the previous generation GTX 650Ti Boost on a wide selection of games to see how it stacks up performance-wise which you can read here.

That is of course after you read Ryan's full review.

nvidia-geforce-gtx750ti-645x399.jpg

"NVIDIA today announced the new GeForce GTX 750 Ti and GTX 750 video cards, which are very interesting to use as they are the first cards based on NVIDIA's new Maxwell graphics architecture. NVIDIA has been developing Maxwell for a number of years and have decided to launch entry-level discrete graphics cards with the new technology first in the $119 to $149 price range. NVIDIA heavily focused on performance per watt with Maxwell and it clearly shows as the GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB video card measures just 5.7-inches in length with a tiny heatsink and doesn't require any internal power connectors!"

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

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Manufacturer: Various

An Upgrade Project

When NVIDIA started talking to us about the new GeForce GTX 750 Ti graphics card, one of the key points they emphasized was the potential use for this first-generation Maxwell GPU to be used in the upgrade process of smaller form factor or OEM PCs. Without the need for an external power connector, the GTX 750 Ti provided a clear performance delta from integrated graphics with minimal cost and minimal power consumption, so the story went.

Eager to put this theory to the test, we decided to put together a project looking at the upgrade potential of off the shelf OEM computers purchased locally.  A quick trip down the road to Best Buy revealed a PC sales section that was dominated by laptops and all-in-ones, but with quite a few "tower" style desktop computers available as well.  We purchased three different machines, each at a different price point, and with different primary processor configurations.

The lucky winners included a Gateway DX4885, an ASUS M11BB, and a Lenovo H520.

IMG_9724.JPG

Continue reading An Upgrade Story: Can the GTX 750 Ti Convert OEMs PCs to Gaming PCs?