GoG Releases LucasArts Classics. More on the Way?

Subject: General Tech | October 28, 2014 - 06:10 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, disney, lucasfilm

Lucasfilm games (think LucasArts) and Disney Interactive have recently been re-introducing their back catalog to the PC. Earlier this month, Disney unleashed its wrath upon Steam, including Epic Mickey 2, which was not available on the PC outside of a limited, Eastern Europe release. Today, they licensed (different) titles to GOG.com: three Star Wars titles and three point-and-click adventures.

lucasarts-tiefighter.jpg

As for the Star Wars titles? Two of them are X-Wing Special Edition and TIE Fighter Special Edition. Both titles include their 1994 and 1998 releases, as well as any applicable expansions. They, along with Sam & Max Hit the Road, have never been sold through digital distribution platforms, prior to today.

Honestly, I never had a chance to play X-Wing and TIE Fighter. I liked space combat games, but I pretty much just played Privateer 1 and 2 as well as some console games, like Star Fox and Rogue Squadron. I was a kid. I played a handful of games to death. I keep hearing that X-Wing and TIE Fighter were, supposedly, the best of the genre. I have no experience with them, though.

These titles are currently the top six best sellers on the service, pulling ahead of The Witcher 3 pre-order as I wrote this post. The press release claims that more titles are on the way "in the coming months".

Source: GOG

Lucasfilm wants to show you a two hour cut scene

Subject: General Tech | September 20, 2013 - 01:55 PM |
Tagged: Star Wars, lucasfilm, lucas art, 1313

In a bid to reduce the time it takes to get a movie to screen as well as saving money on locations and sets Lucasfilm is working to modify their game engine to be used to make movies.  The 1313 teaser that they showed off last year was certainly of almost cinematic quality and as it turns out that observation is more true that we thought.  You can see how they will mix motion capturing with the game engine in the video at the end of The Register's article.  We certainly have a long way to go before we finally make it across the uncanny valley, especially for physical effects like water and fire but there is sense in thinking that game engines can progress to being good enough to replace film.  The real question is if this technology will be available to all so we can all participate in making films and perhaps make Hollywood obsolete.  Maybe plots and character development will make a comeback if everyone can make any special effect they can think of easily and quickly.

sw1313-logo.jpg

"OVER THE NEXT DECADE video game engines will be used in film-making, with the two disciplines combining to eliminate the movie post-production process."

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Source: The Register