Sapphire jumps on the AMD A75 chipset

Subject: Motherboards | July 27, 2011 - 06:03 PM |
Tagged: a75, sapphire, sapphire pure platinum, llano, hudson

Longtime GPU partner Sapphire is taking advantage of the new AMD A75 Hudson-D3 FCH chipset to put out their new Sapphire Pure Platinum A75 motherboard.  Onboard are five SATA3 ports, a single PCIe 16x, a single PCI 4x, two PCIe 1x, and two 32-bit PCI slots along with 7.1 sound from a Realtek ALC892 chip and a mini PCIe slot.  Externally you will find four USB 3.0 ports, HDMI, DVI, DisplayPort, a LAN port and even Bluetooth.  As far as budget boards for Llano go, Hi Tech Legion have not seen better and that was before they managed the 35% overclock.

HTL_sapphire_pure_plat.jpg

"Sapphire has just released their venture into Llano with the Sapphire Pure Platinum A75 Motherboard. The Platinum A75 offers all of the premium niceties that can be found with AMD's Lynx platform. First, there is the top tier A75 Hudson-D3 FCH chipset. This has an FM1 socket for the latest Llano APU chips. There is support for up to 16GB of 800/1033/1333/1600/1866 MHz speed DDR3 memory. This chipset offers exceptional connectivity as you get five SATA3 ports, one 16x PCI-E, two 1x PCI-E, one 4x PCI-E, two 32-bit PCI, and four USB 3.0 ports. Because the APU is a CPU/GPU combination, for video connectivity, there is an HDMI, DVI, and DisplayPort available."

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Motherboards

Overclocking Llano just makes sense, but the RAM not so much

Subject: General Tech | July 25, 2011 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: llano, ddr3-1866, a8-3850

Most reviewers made a financial decision when pairing RAM to review AMD's new Llano A8-3850 processor.  Most chose 1333MHz DDR3, since when building a low cost PC most users are going to choose the lower cost as opposed to spending half the budget simply on DDR3.  After seeing significant overclocks produced by a variety of testers, The Tech Report thought it would be interesting to see the impact of high speed RAM on the performance of an A8-3850, especially the graphics portion.   As it turns out, the decision to go with lower cost RAM made a lot of sense as the the graphical performance did not benefit from faster RAM.

TR_llano dimms.jpg

"Will 1866MHz memory make a big difference to the performance of the AMD A8-3850 APU? How does power consumption look without a discrete GPU involved? We aim to find out."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Video Perspective: AMD Steady Video Technology on AMD A-Series APUs

Subject: Editorial, Graphics Cards | July 25, 2011 - 02:23 PM |
Tagged: amd, APU, llano, steady video, a8-3850, video

In our continuing coverage of the AMD Llano-based A-Series of APUs we have another short video that discusses and evaluates the performance of AMD's Steady Video technology publicly released to the world with the 11.6 driver revision this month.  Steady Video, as we described it in our initial AMD Llano A8-3850 review is:

Using a heterogeneous computing model AMD's driver will have the ability to stabilize "bouncy" video that is usually associated with consumer cameras and unsteady hands.

Basically, AMD is on the war path to show you that your GPU can be used for more than just gaming and video transcoding.  If the APU and heterogeneous computing is to thrive, unique and useful applications of the GPU cores found in Llano, Trinity and beyond must be realized.  Real-time video filtering and stabilization with Steady Video is such an example and is exclusive to AMD GPUs and APUs.

As you can see there are no benchmarks in that video, no numbers we can really quote or reference to tell you "how much" better the corrected videos are compared to the originals.  The examples we gave you there were NOT filtered or selected because they show off the technology better or worse than any others; instead we used it for what AMD said it should be used for - amateur video taken without tripods, etc.  

And since this feature works not only AMD A-Series APUs but also on recent Radeon GPUs, I encourage you all to give it a shot and let us know what you think in our comments here below - do you find the feature useful and effective?  Would you leave the option enabled full time or just turn on when you encounter a particularly bouncy video?

If you haven't seen our previous Video Perspectives focusing on AMD A-Series of APUs, you can catch them here:

Intel and AMD Provide Positive Earnings

Subject: Editorial | July 22, 2011 - 01:59 PM |
Tagged: Sandy Bridge E, Q2 2011, llano, Intel, bulldozer, APU, amd

 

The first half of this year has been surprisingly strong for the chip industry, and Intel and AMD are helping to lead the way and satiate demand for new processors at all market levels.

Intel was first off the bat to release earnings for their 2nd quarter, and they again broke revenue and profit records for Q2.  Gross revenue was a very healthy $13 billion and the company’s net profit was an impressive $3 billion.  Margins are down from last year’s high of 67%, but the actual 61% far outshines that of their competition.  Q2 2010 results were $10.8 billion in gross revenue and $2.9 billion net profit.  While profit was “only” $100 million more than Q1 2010, the extra $2.2 billion in revenue is something to sit up and notice.

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Sandy Bridge based parts have continued to propel Intel's domination of the CPU market.

Probably the two greatest strengths for Intel are extracting the most amount of performance per mm squared of die and of overall process technology leadership.  Intel has been shipping 32 nm parts for some 18 months now, and their redesigned Sandy Bridge architecture has left their primary competition in the dust when it comes to overall multi-core CPU performance.  Intel has improved their integrated graphics capabilities, but this is one area where they simply cannot compete with the more GPU focused AMD.  Intel is also facing much increased competition in the mobile market from the Llano based chips and their accompanying chipset, which has been a virtual fortress for Intel until recently.  While Intel still rules in CPU performance, the combination of rich graphics, chipset features, and competitive power consumption has made Llano a true threat to the mobile sector.

Click here to read more.

Source:

Llano cares about your DIMMs, the size, speed and number of them

Subject: Memory | July 19, 2011 - 01:14 PM |
Tagged: llano, a8-3850

Legit Reviews did a marathon testing run on Llano to see just how dependant is on the memory subsystem.  They took a variety of 4GB DDR3 DIMMs, at 1333MHz, 1600MHz and 1866MHz, which they tried in pairs as well as with all four memory slots filled.  Their testing shows that 1600MHz really is the sweet spot for Llano, not as expensive as the 1866MHz kits and in some tests noticeably faster than the 1333MHz DIMMs.  Also of note was the consistently better performance with 4 DIMMs as compared to a pair.

LR_stalker-memory.jpg

"We found that the memory bandwidth ranges from 13GB/s to 16GB/s with typical dual channel memory kits on our AMD A8-3850 APU and Gigabyte A75-UD4H motherboard. This difference doesn't sound that great, but a 3GB/s increase when dealing with 13GB is a very nice 23% performance increase. Most of this performance gain is seen when moving up from a 1333Mhz to a 1600MHz memory kit is where you'll see the largest performance jump. For example 2x4GB 1333MHz CL8 memory kit was able to hit ~12.7GB/s memory bandwidth, but the 2x4GB 1600MHz CL8 memory kit has ~15.0GB/s of memory bandwidth, which is a very nice 18% improvement over 1333MHz..."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Overclockers Achieve Impressive Llano Overclocking Results, Come Close to 5GHz

Subject: Processors | July 18, 2011 - 11:15 PM |
Tagged: superpi, overclocking, LN2, llano, APU, amd, a8-3850

In a feat of overclocking prowess, the crew over at Akiba have managed to push the AMD Llano A8-3850 to its limits to achieve a Super PI 32M score of 14 minutes and 17.5 seconds at an impressive 4.75GHz. Using a retail A8-3850 APU, a Gigabyte GA-A75-UD4H motherboard, and a spine chilling amount of Liquid Nitrogen, the Japanese overclocking team came very close to breaking the 5GHz barrier.

ssoc1.jpg

Just how close did they come? 4.906.1GHz with a base clock of 169.2MHz to be exact, which is mighty impressive. Unfortunately, the APU had to undergo some sever electroshock therapy at 1.792 Volts! Further, the 4.9GHz clock speed was not stable enough for a valid Super PI 32M result; therefore, the necessity to run the benchmark at 4.75GHz.

The extreme cooling ended up causing issues with the motherboard once the team tried to switch out the A8-3850 for the A6-3650; therefore, they swapped in an Asus F1A75-V PRO motherboard. With the A6-3650, they achieved an overclock of 4.186GHz with a base clock of 161MHz and a voltage of 1.428V. The overclockers stated that they regretted having to swap out the Asus board as they believed the Gigabyte board would have allowed them to overclock the A6-3650 APU higher due to that particular motherboard’s ability to adjust voltage higher.

vsoc2.jpg

Although they did not break the 5GHz barrier, they were still able to achieve an impressive 69% overclock on the A8-3850 and a 61% overclock on the A6-3650 APU. For comparison, here are PC Perspective’s not-APU-frying overclocking results. At a default clock speed of 2.9 and 2.6 respectively, the A8-3850 and A6-3650 seem to have a good deal of headroom when it comes to bumping up the CPU performance. If you have a good aftermarket cooler, Llano starts to make a bit more sense as 3.2GHz on air and 3.6GHz on water are within reach.  How do you feel about Llano?

Source: Akiba

Video Perspective: AMD A-series APU Dual Graphics Technology Performance

Subject: Graphics Cards, Processors | July 13, 2011 - 02:13 PM |
Tagged: llano, dual graphics, crossfire, APU, amd, a8-3850, 3850

Last week we posted a short video about the performance of AMD's Llano core A-series of APUs for gaming and the response was so positive that we have decided to continue on with some other short looks at features and technologies with the processor.  For this video we decided to investigate the advantages and performance of the Dual Graphics technology - the AMD APU's ability to combine the performance of a discrete GPU with the Radeon HD 6550D graphics integrated on the A8-3850 APU.

For this test we set our A8-3850 budget gaming rig to the default clock speeds and settings and used an AMD Radeon HD 6570 1GB as our discrete card of choice.  With a price hovering around $70, the HD 6570 would be a modest purchase for a user that wants to add some graphical performance to their low-cost system but doesn't stretch into the market of the enthusiast.

The test parameters were simple: we knew the GPU on the Radeon HD 6570 was a bit better than that of the A8-3850 APU so we compared performance of the discrete graphics card ALONE to the performance of the system when enabling CrossFire, aka Dual Graphics technology.  The results are pretty impressive:

You may notice that these percentages of scaling are higher than those we found in our first article about Llano on launch day.  The reasoning is that we used the Radeon HD 6670 there and found that while compatible by AMD's directives, the HD 6670 is overpowering the HD 6550D GPU on the APU and the performance delta it provides is smaller by comparison.  

So, just as we said with our APU overclocking video, while adding in a discrete card like the HD 6570 won't turn your PC into a $300 graphics card centered gaming machine it will definitely help performance by worthwhile amounts without anyone feeling like they are wasting the silicon on the A8-3850.  

Source: AMD

Gigabyte's high powered A75M-UD2H for the low powered Llano processor

Subject: Motherboards | July 11, 2011 - 05:18 PM |
Tagged: llano, gigabyte, a75, fm1

Gigabyte made sure that a Llano user will be able to get all that they want out of the  A75M-UD2H; 8+2 phase power, five SATA II I ports and an eSATA on the backplate to keep the combo PS/2 port, D-sub port, DVI-D port, HDMI port, DisplayPort, optical SPDIF connector, two USB 2.0, four USB 3.0 port, one FireWire port, the Gigabit Ethernet port, and 8 channel audio ports.  As you can tell that backplate is very full. It also supports Crossfire with a pair of PCIe slots running 8x when both are populated. Taking the board through its paces was only one facet of Bjorn3D's review, they also pair the board and APU with an HD6870 to see how it performs with a powerful GPU.  Check out the review.

b3d_gigabytea75-ud4h.jpg

"When we looked at Llano, we determined that its CPU performance is similar to Athlon II X4 or Phenom II X4 840 processor, so why would a discrete GPU user choose Llano instead of an Athlon II X4 or Phenom II X4? Should the user choose a more expensive CPU for gaming? Firstly, Llano is more power efficient and runs much cooler than the 45nm processors. We'll be testing the second question today.

In this review, we are not only going to take a look at the GIGABYTE board, but we are also going pair the board with an HD 6870 and run a few games at 1920x1080 resolution with typical settings that average gamers would use to see the impact of CPU performance in games"

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: Bjorn3D

PC Perspective Podcast #161 - AMD Llano Desktop review, the Samsung Droid Charge, RevoDrive 3 X2 and more!

Subject: General Tech | July 7, 2011 - 04:25 PM |
Tagged: podcast, llano, Intel, APU, amd, a8-3850

PC Perspective Podcast #161 - 7/07/2011

This week we talk about our AMD Llano Desktop review, the Samsung Droid Charge, RevoDrive 3 X2 and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath and Allyn Malventano

This Podcast is brought to you by MSI Computer, and their all new Sandy Bridge Motherboards!

Program length: 1:13:13

Program Schedule:

  1. 0:01:03 Introduction
  2. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  3. http://pcper.com/podcast
  4. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  5. 0:01:45 AMD A8-3850 Llano Desktop Processor Review - Can AMD compete with Sandy Bridge?
  6. 0:25:15 Samsung Droid Charge Review: The Droid Brand Goes 4G
  7. 0:26:20 This Podcast is brought to you by MSI Computer, and their all new Sandy Bridge Motherboards!
  8. 0:27:15 RevoDrive 3 article comments
  9. 0:35:25 VIA Technologies To Sell Of Its Stake in S3 Graphics
  10. 0:38:15 Meet Hondo, AMD's soon to arrive 2W TDP Brazos chip for tablets ... and Apache servers?
  11. 0:45:50 Just Delivered: ASUS ROG MATRIX GeForce GTX 580 1.5GB Graphics Card
  12. 0:50:20 Video Perspective: Corsair Special Edition White Graphite Series 600T Case
  13. 0:52:45 Video Perspective: AMD A-series APU Overclocking and Gaming Performance
  14. 0:59:25 Quakecon Reminder - http://www.quakecon.org/
  15. 1:01:24 Hardware / Software Pick of the Week
    1. Ryan: AMD A-series APU system ~ $430
    2. Jeremy: Kogan offers free hdmi cable to cut the UK cable con
    3. Josh: Cheap!
    4. Allyn: http://www.jailbreakme.com
  16. http://pcper.com/podcast   
  17. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  18. 1:10:20 Closing

Source:

Video Perspective: AMD A-series APU Overclocking and Gaming Performance

Subject: Graphics Cards, Motherboards, Processors | July 6, 2011 - 08:15 PM |
Tagged: amd, llano, APU, a-series, a8, a8-3850, overclocking

We have spent quite a bit of time with AMD's latest processor, the A-series of APUs previously known as Llano, but something we didn't cover in the initial review was how overclocking the A8-3850 APU affected gaming performance for the budget-minded gamer.  Wonder no more!

In this short video we took the A8-3850 and pushed the base clock frequency from 100 MHz to 133 MHz and overclocked the CPU clock rate from 2.9 GHz to 3.6 GHz while also pushing the GPU frequency from 600 MHz up to 798 MHz.  All of the clock rates (including CPU, GPU, memory and north bridge) are based on that base frequency so overclocking on the AMD A-series can be pretty simple provided the motherboard vendors provide the multiplier options to go with it.  We tested a system based on a Gigabyte and an ASRock motherboard both with very good results to say the least.  

We tested 3DMark11, Bad Company 2, Lost Planet 2, Left 4 Dead 2 and Dirt 3 to give us a quick overall view of performance increases.  We ran the games at 1680x1050 resolutions and "Medium"-ish quality settings to find a base frame rate on the APU of about 30 FPS.  Then we applied our overclocked settings to see what gains we got.  Honestly, I was surprised by the results.

While overclocking a Llano-based gaming rig won't make it compete against $200 graphics cards, getting a nice 30% boost in performance for a budget minded gamer is basically a no-brainer if you are any kind of self respecting PC enthusiast. 

Source: AMD