A look at the 65W AMD A8-3800

Subject: General Tech | October 6, 2011 - 09:57 AM |
Tagged: amd, A8-3800, llano, APU, Turbo Core

When the A8-3850 hit the streets we were so accustomed to high powered CPUs that we barely blinked at the 100W power envelope it and the A6-3650 required.  That is a big change from just a few years ago when hitting or passing 100W tended to bring a lot of negative comments from reviewers.  AMD since released the lower powered A8-3800 and A6-3600, both of which have slightly lower CPU frequencies but the exact same graphics specifications.  The Tech Report took the A8-3800 out for a spin to examine not only the power draw but to see how well the Turbo Core feature works.  See how it turned out for AMD's newest Llano chips in the full review.

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"We weren't terribly impressed with AMD's A8-3850 APU when we first reviewed it, in part because its 100W power envelope seemed rather large for a chip whose integrated graphics are a major selling point. Happily, the new A8-3800 slides into a cool 65W power envelope and adds Turbo Core clock frequency scaling. Can it win our approval? Keep reading to find out."

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Oh Llano, wherefore art thou?

Subject: General Tech | October 3, 2011 - 09:14 AM |
Tagged: llano, APU, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, 28nm, 32nm, trinity, amd

Woe is AMD, as it becomes ever more obvious that Llano is not giving good yields at GLOBALFOUNDRIES.  Back in July the market noticed that while the new Llano chips were great at providing good enough graphics for a great price, they were very hard to find.  As a consumer you might be able to find a notebook to purchase for yourself but as a reseller who needs to buy processors in the thousands before considering that chip as a part of the new product line up you have been out of luck.  According to DigiTimes this will change in 2012 with the arrival of Trinity which will still use GLOBALFOUNDRIES 32nm process, turning to TSMC for the 28nm graphical portion.  The previous hope that the supply problems would be solved in September were obviously a little too optimistic.

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"Supply of AMD's Llano APUs, affected by Globalfoundries's lower-than-expected 32nm yield rates, has been significantly limited and is unlikely to recover until the company's upcoming Trinity arrives in 2012, according to sources from motherboard players. When asked about the company's upcoming Trinity schedule, AMD Taiwan declined to comment on unannounced products.

AMD started suffering from Llano APU supply shortages in July due to the yield issues and the company originally expected the supply status to return to normal in September. However, judging from the current situation, the sources believe the company's supply volume is unlikely to meet client demand through the end of 2011.

The sources estimated that the yield rate issue should be resolved in 2012, when Trinity launches."

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Source: DigiTimes

The birth of the $600 gaming laptop; thank you AMD

Subject: Mobile | September 28, 2011 - 03:10 PM |
Tagged: llano, amd, A6-3400M, HD 6720G2, HD 6650M, HD 6520G, asus, A53T

Asus' A53T is powered by the Llano A6-3400M and 6GB of DDR3-1333 with graphics from the discrete HD6520G and the built in HD 6650M, which is apparently labelled as the HD6720G2.  A 15.6" 1366x768 LCD gives you decent resolution on the road and the HDMI and D-Sub out give you better resolution when you are at home.  The Tech Report were not incredibly impressed with the battery life, during movie playback it died after a bit over 3 hours, though still long enough to get through Avatar.  Gaming was more than satisfactory at the native resolution of the monitor and will handle higher resolutions with the video out acceptably well.  Head on over for the full review.

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"Here we have our first example of a genuine, honest-to-goodness consumer laptop powered by AMD's latest and greatest accelerated processing unit. How does it perform?"

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ZOTAC Announces A75-ITX WiFi

Subject: Motherboards | September 22, 2011 - 09:37 AM |
Tagged: SFF< Zotac, llano, A75-ITX WiFi, a75

HONG KONG – Sept. 22, 2011 – ZOTAC International, a leading innovator and the world’s largest channel manufacturer of graphics cards, motherboards and mini-PCs, today announces the A75-ITX WiFi platform that enable users to embrace the power of AMD accelerated processing units, or APUs, in a compact mini-ITX form factor to form the perfect gaming capable home theatre PC.

The ZOTAC A75-ITX WiFi features an FM1 socket to take advantage of the latest AMD A8, A6, A4 and E2 series APUs with AMD Radeon™ HD 6000 series graphics processors for the perfect synergy of CPU and GPU performance power. Two memory slots enable users to install up to 8GB of high-speed DDR3 memory with speeds up to 1866 MHz, depending on the APU installed, for maximum system responsiveness for media playback, gaming and every-day use.

“Our goal at ZOTAC is to pack as many features and capabilities into the smallest form factory possible. The ZOTAC A75-ITX WiFi is no different – we’ve packed it with features and expansion capabilities typical of larger ATX offerings,” said Carsten Berger, marketing director, ZOTAC International.

There is plenty of expansion with the ZOTAC A75-ITX WiFi, including a PCI Express x16 slot, up to eight USB 3.0 and four SATA 6.0 Gb/s ports, for maximum internal and external upgrade potential from a compact form factor. Dual Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11n WiFi and Bluetooth 3.0 networking technologies enable the ZOTAC A75-ITX WiFi to deliver lightning-fast network transfers over wires or wireless and easily connect to wireless peripherals and phones.

It’s time to play with the ZOTAC A75-ITX WiFi mini-ITX platform.

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General details

  • New ZOTAC A75-ITX WiFi mini-ITX platform
  • AMD A75 chipset
  • AMD A8, A6, A4 & E2-series APU compatible (socket FM1)
  • 2 x DDR3 DIMM slots (up to 1866 MHz, speed varies by APU, up to 8GB)
  • DVI, HDMI & VGA (with included adapter) outputs
  • PCI Express x16 expansion
  • 4 SATA 6.0 Gb/s w/RAID 0, 1, 0+1 support
  • 8 USB 3.0 ports (6 on back panel, 2 via pin header)
  • 2 USB 2.0 ports (2 via pin headers)
  • Dual Gigabit Ethernet
  • Hardware accelerated Blu-ray playback ready
  • Dolby TrueHD & DTS-HD Master Audio bitstream capable
  • Digital S/PDIF output (optical)
  • 8-channel high-definition audio
  • Microsoft DirectX 11 compliant
  • Onboard 802.11n WiFi & Bluetooth 3.0 technology
  • Mini-ITX form factor

 

Source: Zotac
Author:
Subject: Processors
Manufacturer: AMD

Bulldozer Ships for Revenue

Some months back we covered the news that AMD had released its first revenue shipments of Llano.  This was a big deal back then, as it was the first 32 nm based product from AMD, and one which could help AMD achieve power and performance parity with Intel in a number of platforms.  Llano has gone on to be a decent seller for AMD, and it has had a positive effect on AMD’s marketshare in laptops.  Where once AMD was a distant second in overall terms of power and performance in the mobile environment, Llano now allows them to get close to the CPU performance of the Intel processors, achieve much greater performance in graphics workloads, and has matched Intel in overall power consumption.

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KY Wong and Marshall Kwait hand off the first box of Bulldozer based Interlagos processors to Cray's Joe Fitzgerald.  Photo courtesy of AMD.

Some five months later we are now making the same type of announcement for AMD and their first revenue shipment of the Bulldozer core.  The first chips off the line are actually “Interlagos” chips; basically server processors that feature upwards of 16 cores (8 modules, each module containing two integer units and then the shared 256 bit FPU/SSE SIMD unit).  The first customer is Cray, purveyor of fine supercomputers everywhere.  They will be integrating these new chips into their Cray XE6 supercomputers, which have been purchased by a handful of governmental and education entities around the world.

Continue reading for our analysis on AMD's processor future...

More on GLOBALFOUNDRIES 32nm process and the supply problems we've seen

Subject: General Tech | September 7, 2011 - 11:07 AM |
Tagged: GLOBALFOUNDRIES, 32nm, llano

We have mentioned in the Podcast and on the front page that GLOBALFOUNDRIES 32nm process has been having some problems.  Poor yields have prevented AMD from hitting the targets that they wanted to see from Llano thought they still produce enough to sell.  The supply is enough to keep up with the demands of the individual DIY system builders but AMD really wants major laptop and system vendors to pick up Llano as a base for new models.  Since they want to order very large numbers of APUs at the same time, until Llano can reliably be available for bulk purchases AMD's new APU is not terribly attractive to those vendors.  Why is the Llano having such troubles? Check out Charlie's theory over at SemiAccurate.

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"Global Foundries is having the proverbial ‘issues’ with their high end 32nm-SHP process. The knee-jerk reaction is to kick GloFo for the problems, but that doesn’t take in to account the good partss of the process.

To say this story is complex and nuanced is putting things mildly. The 32nm-SHP process is the first foundry process to ship High-K Metal Gate (HKMG) chips, and it is the first foundry to ship customer products on a sub-40nm process. They are also the only foundry shipping HKMG products with strain, aka a SiGe cap. That is the hard part, compared to strain, the rest of the HKMG process is easy. The fact that AMD has shipped almost 10 million Llano CPUs by now says that something is going right. GloFo is currently making things that no one else can, and with a 6+ month lead on the competition."

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Source: SemiAccurate

Bulldozer Infused Trinity APU Specifications Confirmed

Subject: Processors | September 2, 2011 - 09:07 PM |
Tagged: trinity, llano, bulldozer, APU, amd

AMD has not only started announcing quite a few future processors, but has also gone a bit crazy with all of the code names for said products. Admittedly, when the news broke that Trinity APU specifications were revealed, I had to do a bit of digging to figure out just what the Trinity APU was (exactly). In the end, the APU (accelerated processing unit) is similar in composition to Llano except with a bulldozer based CPU core and upgraded GPU. The bulldozer core aspect is what threw me for a bit of a loop in that I had a difficult time figuring out how the CPU core could be based on bulldozer when bulldozer hasn’t even been released ;).  Hopefully that long introduction helps somewhat in clearing up what Trinity is.

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Specifically, the new Trinity APU will debut with AMD’s new “Piledriver” (more code names!) architecture, and include a Radeon HD 7000 series GPU and Bulldozer based CPU core. Futher, the Trinity APU will come in both notebook and desktop flavors titled “Comal” and “Virgo” respectively. AMD notes that the improvements in the CPU and GPU cores will result in up to a 50% performance increase over the current Llano A Series APUs. While the 50% number is measuring pure gigaflop performance, even if the real world speed increase is not as noticeable in everyday usage, it is still a nice bump in performance.

On the availability front, AMD has slated the processor for release in 2012; however, Semi Accurate believes that the APU may well debut much sooner than expected. The site further quoted sources who stated that “CES is a distinct possibility for a soft launch, and maybe more.” More tidbits of information can be had here.

Checking A8-3850 overclocking capability 7 times

Subject: Processors | August 30, 2011 - 09:50 AM |
Tagged: a8-3850, amd, llano, overclocking, APU

Legit Reviews decide that they really wanted to be able to show the overclocking results you can expect from the AMD A8-3850, so they picked up eight of the chips to test each for overclocking ability.  There have been examples in the past of chips with a wide variety of overclocking limits which was often decided by the chip revision but not in all cases.  The test results show that all but two of the chips hit a stability issue when being pushed beyond 3679.5MHz, so you can take that as the most likely result that your chip will provide.  The two outlying chips will be exceptional, in one case in a bad way which you can see in the full review.

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"When AMD released the 'Lynx' desktop platform back in June 2011, our motherboard reviewer ran into some bad luck when overclocking the processor. When you get a new platform setup for the very first time you really don't know what to expect and it does take some time to learn all the quirks and nuances of a new processor and motherboard. We recently ordered in six more processors and then overclocked all seven of them to see what the best one would be for our test system!"

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Llano on Linux, good but not good enough

Subject: Processors | August 22, 2011 - 09:06 AM |
Tagged: amd, linux, llano, a8-3850

Phoronix is still satisfying their curiosity about the performance of Llano under Linux.  To that end they assembled an A8-3850 with Gigabyte's GA-A75M-UD2H motherboard, 2GB of DDR3 memory, and a 60GB OCZ Vertex 2 SSD and installed Ubuntu 11.04 64-bit, GNOME 2.32.1, X.Org Server 1.10.1, and an EXT4 file-system.  To power the system they had a few choices but unfortunately the one they were most interested in, AMD's Open64 4.2.4, failed to compile.  That left them with two versions of GCC and Clang to test in a variety of benchmarks.  There is still some work to do to bring all of the power of Llano to Linux, but for now this will give you a good idea which to use.

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"Last week were a set of AMD Fusion A8-3850 Linux benchmarks on Phoronix, but for you this week is a look at the AMD Fusion "Llano" APU performance when trying out a few different compilers. In particular, the latest GCC release and then using the highly promising Clang compiler on LLVM, the Low-Level Virtual Machine."

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Source: Phoronix

Llano is running short

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2011 - 07:43 AM |
Tagged: shortage, llano, amd

Not all is well with AMD and GLOBALFOUNDRIES 32nm process as the yields have been so low as to effect the supply of Llano chips.  Currently only two chips, the A8-3850 and A6-3650 are on the market, with three more models expected fairly soon.  Since AMD beleives that there supply difficulties will be overcome by September the shortages should not delay the release of the new lower power chips.  DigiTimes also mentioned some news about NVIDIA's 28nm products that makes the outlook for this time next year a little bleak.

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"AMD's latest Llano-based processors are currently suffering from shortages due to the weaker-than-expected yield rates of the related 32nm process; however, AMD has already notified its partners that the shortage should be resolved by early September, according to sources from motherboard makers.

Due to the new platform's strong performance/price ratio, market demand for Llano APUs is rising gradually with sales of the compatible A75-based motherboards also expected to increase, the sources noted. However, because the supply of Llano APUs in July started turn tight because of weak 32nm yields, AMD currently has a lot of orders from the retail channel, but is unable to fulfill the shipments.

With AMD set to resolve its APU shortages in early September, many motherboard makers are already starting to increase their A75-based motherboard shipments.

In addition to the existing Llano CPUs, A8-3850 and A6-3650, AMD will launch three more 65W APUs, A8-3800, A6-3600 and A6-3500 at the end of the third quarter.

In additional news, although AMD, Nvidia and Qualcomm's 28nm chips finished tape-outs in June, and the companies are all ready to place orders in the second half, as demand from the retail channel remains weak, it is likely that the players will delay their orders to a later time, the sources added."

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Source: DigiTimes