HD video streaming drone with autopilot; have fun with the 3DR Solo

Subject: General Tech | April 15, 2015 - 12:35 PM |
Tagged: drone, linux, 3DRobotics, Cortex A9, solo

The 3DR Solo drone is powered by a Cortex A9 processor running at 1GHz which gives the Pixhawk 2 autopilot feature some power to work with, a good thing as some pilots will be too busy watching the HD video stream.  If you buy the model with the GoPro gimbal or knock one up yourself, the Solo is capable of wireless streaming 720p video up to a distance of 1.2 miles (1.9km) with a delay of about 180ms.  You will have a flight time of 25 minutes unladen, 20 minutes if you are hauling a GoPro or any other equivalent payload.  It will not be cheap, it is being released on May 29th at a price of $1000 or $1400 with a GoPro gimbal, but you can check out more of the stats at Linux.com if you are still interested.

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"3DRobotics today announced its first Linux-based drone, a Solo quadcopter touted as the first Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) to support full control of GoPro cameras and deliver live-streaming HD video to mobile devices."

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Source: Linux.com

A quiet upgrade to Linux 4.0

Subject: General Tech | April 13, 2015 - 12:28 PM |
Tagged: linux, Linux 4.0

The upgrade to version 4.0 of the Linux kernel happened quietly over the weekend, less a huge step forward than an incremental improvement.  The most interesting feature for those who support Linux boxes will be the non-disruptive kernel patching, allowing you to apply patches without causing downtime; assuming you properly tested the patches that is.  As well support for Intel's new Quark processor has been added and support for the Z13 found in IBM machines has also been improved.  It was hinted to The Inquirer that version 4.1 is likely to see far more changes incorporated in its release.

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"The new number isn't a sign of a major upgrade. As we've chronicled, Torvalds thinks that it looks a bit silly when version numbers go beyond x.19. He therefore decided it would be best to tick over from 3.19 to 4.0 for the sake of neatness, rather than to celebrate any particular milestone in the kernel."

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Source: The Register

Saved so much using Linux you can afford a Titan X?

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 27, 2015 - 04:02 PM |
Tagged: gtx titan x, linux, nvidia

Perhaps somewhere out there is a Linux user who wants a TITAN X and if there is they will like the results of Phoronix's testing.  The card works perfectly straight out of the box with the latest 346.47 driver as well as the 349.12 Beta; if you want to use Nouveau then don't buy this card.  The TITAN did not win any awards for power efficiency but for OpenCL tests, synthetic OpenGL benchmarks and Unigine on Linux it walked away a clear winner.  Phoronix, and many others, hope that AMD is working on an updated Linux driver to accompany the new 300 series of cards we will see soon to help them be more competitive on open source systems.

If you are sick of TITAN X reviews by now, just skip to their 22 GPU performance roundup of Metro Redux.

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"Last week NVIDIA unveiled the GeForce GTX TITAN X during their annual GPU Tech Conference. Of course, all of the major reviews at launch were under Windows and thus largely focused on the Direct3D performance. Now that our review sample arrived this week, I've spent the past few days hitting the TITAN X hard under Linux with various OpenGL and OpenCL workloads compared to other NVIDIA and AMD hardware on the binary Linux drivers."

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Source: Phoronix

In love with smartwatches but want them open source and under $1000?

Subject: Mobile | March 24, 2015 - 07:02 PM |
Tagged: Android, linux, smartwatch

Linux.com offers you a shopping list of smartwatches which are all less expensive than the fruit flavoured models and run Android or Linux.  From familiar models like the Pebble and the older and less impressive Neptune Pine and Omate TrueSmart to leaked models like the Tizen-based Samsung Orbis you have quite a few choices to look through.  There is even  Monohm's large Runcible that is more of a pocket watch than a wrist watch to consider.  In many cases the details are a bit lacking but the model names are known so you can get a leg up on your research for when they are finally revealed with full specifications.

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"Much to the delight of Apple fanbots everywhere, Apple has now fully unveiled the Apple Watch. The watch, which was previewed in September, will go on sale April 10 and ship on the 24th. Based on its brand name, styling, accessories, and battery life claims, it will likely be a big hit -- at least as far as smartwatches go."

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Source: Linux.com

Microsoft Changes Secure Boot Rules with Windows 10, Could Mean OS Lockout

Subject: General Tech | March 22, 2015 - 09:14 PM |
Tagged: windows 10, Secure Boot, microsoft, linux

Secure Boot is a security measure that prevents malware from interfering with the boot process, but it can also prevent unsigned operating systems from booting on the same hardware. While Microsoft’s “Designed for Windows 8” guidelines required manufacturers to permit users to disable the Secure Boot option, the upcoming Windows 10 release will not have this rule in effect. At WinHEC it has been revealed that Windows 10 guidelines leave it up to the OEM to decide if they will allow users to disable UEFI Secure Boot in the system setup, and making this optional presents an interesting question about compatibility with other operating systems. OEM's will be required to ship computers with Secure Boot enabled to comply with “Designed for…” rules, and while they could then choose to provide the option to disable it (currently the required standard), preventing user installation of other OS software could be seen as a way to streamline support by eliminating variables.

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Image Credit: Ars Technica

Why does this matter if most people who purchase a Windows 10 computer will run Windows 10 on it? This could be an issue for someone who wished to either replace that Windows 10 installation with another OS, or simply dual-boot with an OS that didn’t support the Secure Boot feature (which could be a build of Linux or even an older version of Windows). Requiring OS files to contain digital signatures effectively locks out other operating systems without special workarounds or keys, and although open-source operating systems represent a small segment of the market thanks to the way computer hardware is sold to most people, it is concerning to think future hardware could cause a loss of the freedom of choice we have always had with operating systems.

Microsoft enjoys market dominance with Windows thanks to its licensing model (giving it a monopoly on pre-built PC systems that don’t have an Apple or Chrome logo on them), but reportedly began considering possibilities "to assert its intellectual property against Linux or any other open-source software” a decade ago, and this has reached farther than they probably imagined with the adoption of Android (from which Microsoft makes money on every device sold). Is this Secure Boot move nefarious, and does Microsoft consider Linux to be a potential threat to the their desktop market share? It could be that Microsoft would simply like to claim that Windows 10 is the safest version of Windows yet, and that isn’t a bad thing for consumers. Unless they want to easily use another OS on the hardware they purchased, that is.

Source: Ars Technica

Preparing a Broadwell powered NUC for Linux

Subject: Systems | February 6, 2015 - 02:04 PM |
Tagged: linux, nuc, Broadwell

After the great experience Phoronix had setting up the X1 Carbon with both Fedora and Ubuntu, they purchased a new Broadwell based NUC to experiment with. This model uses the Core i3 5010U with an onboard 900MHz HD Graphics 5500, support for 2 DIMMs of up to 64GB of DDR3-1866, an M.2 SSD card and a 2.5" HDD or SSD.  Intel has stated that Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora, and openSUSE will all be compatible so Phoronix has a bit of testing ahead of them.  There are no benchmarks as of yet but you can see their teardown of this new NUC here.

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"With wrapping up my Core i7 5600U Broadwell Linux tests using the new ThinkPad X1 Carbon in the next few days, fortunately the Intel BOXNUC5I3RYH just arrived as the first available NUC Kit shipping with a Broadwell processor. The NUC5i3RYH features a Broadwell Core i3 processor, HD Graphics 5500, and support for a M.2 SSD card and 2.5-inch HDD/SSD."

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Source: Phoronix

Chromecast meets Linux

Subject: General Tech | January 21, 2015 - 02:01 PM |
Tagged: linux, chromecast, DIY, stream

Linux.com has put together a quick tutorial on how to stream content to Chromecast from a machine running Linux, giving you an incredibly inexpensive and effective way to stream your own capture media.  With the use of a Samba group in openSUSE you can send data to the Chromecast dongle attached to your TV, something that was not initially possible with Chromecast.  The author took this a step further, showing you how to set up your Android devices to stream to Chromecast as well.  Learn how to here.

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"Chromecast is one of the most used devices in my household. After using it for over a year now, I believe there is no longer a market for the so-called 'smart TV'. Inexpensive devices like Chromecast can turn any HDMI-enabled TV into a smart TV with immense possibilities to expand its features."

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Source: Linux.com

Steam for Linux will teach you the difference between backups and redundancy

Subject: General Tech | January 16, 2015 - 12:45 PM |
Tagged: steam, linux, idiots

If you move the Steam home directory of $STEAMROOT in Linux then you are running the risk of running rm -rf on your user directory, which in the case of this unfortunate person on Slashdot included their attached USB hard drive.  This is rather nasty bug and one which is easily avoidable by the use of proper syntax but unfortunately the command rm -rf "$STEAMROOT/"* contains an unnecessary / and without an error checking facility included if there is no $STEAMROOT directory the command run is rm -rf "/"*.  As it is in your home folder you do not even need to be running as root so for the time being it would be very wise to leave your Steam files in their default location and to realize that anything plugged into your machine is not a true backup until removed from your system.

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"I launched steam. It did not launch, it offered to let me browse, and still could not find it when I pointed to the new location. Steam crashed. I restarted it. It re-installed itself and everything looked great. Until I looked and saw that steam had apparently deleted everything owned by my user recursively from the root directory. Including my 3tb external drive I back everything up to that was mounted under /media."

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Source: Slashdot

Red Hat drops the 7.1 Enterprise Beta for your testing pleasure

Subject: Networking | December 15, 2014 - 12:46 PM |
Tagged: linux, Red Hat, rhel, little-endian

Hot on the heels of Fedora's release last week comes a Beta release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.  The new release comes with updates to user authentication via LDAP, Kerberos and FreeOTP as well as Security Content Automation Protocol Security Guides which are standards intended to make compliance and security testing easier.  OpenLMI is a standardized remote API for configuring Linux severs and will be very welcome for those who have to manage servers remotely and may be one of the most heavily tested of the new features on this OS.  Lastly, The Register notes that this version brings little-endian support when running on Power8 hardware which will make porting applications far less of a nightmare than it currently is.

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"RED HAT HAS ANNOUNCED the availability of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7.1 Beta with enhancements to improve ease of use, manageability and performance, as well as support for IBM Power8 little endian architecture."

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Source: The Register

Free hat! The Clouds are opening up, time to put on Fedora 21

Subject: General Tech | December 10, 2014 - 12:40 PM |
Tagged: linux, Fedora, Fedora 21, cloud

Fedora 21 has been released in three different flavours, each intended for a different usage scenario.  The Server version is designed for exactly what it sounds like while the new Cloud version has a modular kernel which is more friendly for being run on remote hardware and is likely to show up in Microsoft Azure's choice of image in their IaaS interface.  The Workstation version is the one that was examined at Linux.com and is likely to be the most common version installed by users.  Fedora has always been a choice for the brave as they tend to be on the cutting edge and while that does mean that they offer features unavailable on other flavours of Linux there can be the occasional bug or other obstacles.  Linux.com found only two so far, Nautilus aka Files stopped working and needed to be either reinstalled or preferably replaced with a better file manager.  The other was an unclear GUI during the updated installation process which is easily avoided once you have seen the screen more than once.  The positives far outnumber the negatives, this looks to be a great improvement on a solid OS and one which should retain its popularity with the software development crowd.  Read the article for the full list of included software and improvements.

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"Fedora is among the most respected Linux-based distributions. Known as a bleeding edge operating system it offers the latest technologies at the earliest stages. It’s also known for working with upstream projects instead of patching things downstream."

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Source: Linux.com