Backing up with Linux is a snap

Subject: General Tech | October 4, 2013 - 12:34 PM |
Tagged: linux, rsync, crontab, backup, automation

If you have any data that is important to you then you should have a backup scheme in place, even if it is simply keeping several copies of the files on different media but for many Windows users the idea of a proper automated backup scheme is something for businesses and not home users.  Then they lose some baby pictures.  At that point it is common for the sad individual to buy an additional piece of equipment that backs up at the push of a button but still tends to be kept in physical proximity to the machine it is backing up.

However if you know someone who is familiar with Linux or are not scared to try something new yourself, there are tools that exist in Linux which allow you to script a complete backup of a system, or parts thereof, to a remote location automatically; no user interaction required.  Techgage will take you through the wonderful world of rsync, crontab and 1ftp which are powerful tools in Linux and Unix to backup your data automatically and without constantly using huge amounts of bandwidth.  Spend a bit of time with some old hardware and you should be able to build yourself a backup server or NAS for free.

Rsync-Under-Cygwin.png

"Keeping good backups of your data is important; don’t be the sucker who loses important files and has to deal with it afterwards! In this in-depth guide, you’ll learn about using rsync and lftp to transfer files, writing your own scripts and automating them, and backing up to external storage, a NAS, and a remote server without passwords."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Techgage

AMD Published GPU Guides for Open Source Community

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | October 2, 2013 - 09:03 PM |
Tagged: amd, linux

Last week, NVIDIA published documentation for Nouveau to heal wounds with the open source community. AMD had a better reputation and intends to maintain it. On Tuesday, Alex Deucher published 9 PDF documents, 1178 pages of register and acceleration documentation along with 18 pages of HDA GPU audio programming details, compared to the 42 pages NVIDIA published.

amd-new2.png

Sure, a page to page comparison is meaningless, but it is clear AMD did not want to be outdone. This is especially true when you consider that some of these documents date back to early 2009. Still, reactionary or not, the open source community should accept the assistance with open arms... and open x86s?

I should note that these documents do not cover Volcanic Islands; they are for everything between Evergreen and Sea Islands.

Source: AMD

AMD Catalyst 13.10 Beta V2 has been released for Windows and Linux

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 30, 2013 - 06:30 PM |
Tagged: graphics drivers, catalyst 13.10, beta, windows, linux

ruby6.png

AMD Catalyst 13.10 Beta V2 for Windows:

  • Includes 32-bit single GPU and CrossFire game profile for Battlefield 4
  • Total War: Rome 2 CrossFire profile update
  • CrossFire frame pacing improvements for CPU-bound applications
  • Resolves image corruption seen in Autodesk Investor 2014
  • Resolves intermittent black screen when resuming from a S3/S4 sleep state if the display is unplugged during the sleep state on systems supporting AMD Enduro Technology
  • Updated AMD Enduro Technology application profiles

o Profile highlights:

  • Total War: Rome 2
  • Battlefield 4
  • Saints Row 4
  • Splinter Cell Blacklist
  • FIFA 14

AMD Catalyst 13.10 Beta for Linux:

Resolved issue highlights:

  • System hang up when startx after setting up an Eyefinity desktop.
  • Permission issue with procfs on kernel 3.10
  • System hang observed while running disaster stress test on Ubuntu 12.10
  • Hang is observed when running Unigine on Linux
  • AC/DC switching is not automatically detected
  • Laptop backlight adjustment is broken
  • Glxtest failures observed in log file with forcing on Anti-Aliasing
  • Cairo-dock is broken
  • Severe desktop corruption is observed when enabled compiz in certain cases 
  • glClientWaitSync is waiting even when timeout is 0
  • C4Engine get corruption with GL_ARB_texture_array enabled

Source: AMD

NVIDIA Mends Open Sores? Documentation for Nouveau.

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | September 25, 2013 - 02:59 AM |
Tagged: nvidia, Nouveau, linux

AMD commit numerous updates to the open source driver community, three months ago, and has otherwise assisted the Linux community in the past. The same has not been true for NVIDIA. Despite a respectable (albeit lacking compared to Windows) proprietary driver for Linux, this GPU vendor was not adored by the community. They have not been accused of malice, it would just seem to be control over both the end-user experience and, of course, their secret sauce.

Well, NVIDIA is being more cooperative.

13-1.jpg

I, obviously, do not have a crystal ball of fortune telling (the journalist house of auction ran out and the gift shop is just too expensive) so it is anyone's guess the future extent of NVIDIA's involvement. For now, their assistance included 42 pages of Device Control Block documentation and proprietary developers answering questions on the Nouveau mailing list.

Many, from Ars Technica to our staff discussions at PC Perspective, note how the change of heart aligns with the SteamOS announcement. I do not really believe these events are related if only because I doubt NVIDIA would wait to contact developers until Valve spoke up. I would have to expect that SteamOS would not be a surprise to NVIDIA especially after Gabe Newell discussed Maxwell virtualization all the way back at CES.

You would think they would have come about while working with NVIDIA on the game streaming technology. You know, allow a single desktop to utilize multiple games across multiple devices. Even still, you would think NVIDIA would just put even more effort into their proprietary driver rather than help Nouveau.

Either way, we will keep an ear out for NVIDIA involvement with the open source community.

Tips on setting up Virtual Machines in Linux

Subject: General Tech | September 9, 2013 - 02:43 PM |
Tagged: virtualization, virtualbox, linux

When we talk about virtualization at PC Perspective we tend to talk about Windows, both for the host and the VMs.  For those who want a more penguin flavoured VM, Linux.com has a brief look at how to set up VirtualBox on a machine running Linux and creating and provisioning VMs.  Why should only Microsoft users benefit from the new optimizations on Intel and AMD processors?

lcom_fig-2-centos.jpg

"VirtualBox is the excellent and user-friendly Type 2 Hypervisor that supports all the major operating systems. A Type 2 Hypervisor requires a host operating system to install on, and VirtualBox can be installed on Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, and Windows. Then you can run any of these operating systems on VirtualBox as guests in virtual machines."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Linux.com

A Linux powered laptop from System76 with all the trimmings

Subject: Mobile | August 27, 2013 - 02:07 PM |
Tagged: linux, ubuntu, system76, Gazelle Pro

The component list of System76's Gazelle Professional laptop reads like a $1000+ ultrabook, a Core i7 4900MQ, 8GB of DDR3-1600, a 120GB Intel 520 SSD and 15.6-inch 1080p display.  Instead of Windows it ships with Ubuntu 13.04, part of the reason you can purchase the base model for $830.  Support for Haswell's HD Graphics 4600 is solid, with performance  far beyond the old HD Graphics 3000; the Ivy Bridge GPU can sometimes outperform Haswell but that will change as drivers improve.  Take a peek at the benchmarks in Phoronix's review.

phoronix_s76.jpg

"System76 recently sent over their Haswell-based Gazelle Professional laptop that sports HD Graphics 4600, a fancy Intel SSD, 8GB of system memory, and a beautiful HD display. This Haswell Linux laptop has already been used for testing within a few Phoronix articles while now is a full look at this Ubuntu laptop along with some comparison performance tests."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

Mobile

Source: Phoronix

Insync 1.0 For Linux Finally Out of Beta Status

Subject: General Tech | August 2, 2013 - 12:57 AM |
Tagged: linux, insync, google drive, file sync

Insync, a service that enables file syncing between local machines and Google Drive cloud storage recently announced that its Linux client has been updated to version 1.0 and is officially out of beta.

Insync 1 for Linux.jpg

Several bug fixes and performance tweaks hve been made to the Insync Linux client, which has gone through several beta testing/feedback cycles between the Windows and Mac 1.0 release and the new Linux 1.0 release. Users can now install Insync for Linux on various Linux distributions using apt-get or yum. Insync 1.0 for Linux will further add a new right-click context menu that allows users to add files to Insync and the software takes care of adding a symlink to the Insync folder automatically. The local Insync files will then be sync to Google Drive, including your documents.

Unfortunately, the file compare update is still being worked on. This update wil enable users to update to version 1.0 from a x.9 release without re-downloading all of their data stored in Google Drive. According to Insync, this feature is slated for inclusion in the Insync 1.1 Linux client.

More information on the latest Insync for Linux application can be found at insynchq.com/linux.

Source: Insync

Could Linux 3.11 for Workgroups win the Desktop for Linux? Okay, probably not, but it's a good pun.

Subject: General Tech, Systems | July 17, 2013 - 03:58 AM |
Tagged: linux, Windows 3.11

Remember the time where Microsoft would only succeed on their third attempt? Did you ever wonder where Microsoft lost their way, instead stuck with some semi-regular sequence of alternating good and terrible? I cannot tell you at what point we lost the magical third version, it left unannounced about a decade ago, but Windows 3 will be its earliest popular example. Windows 3.11 for Workgroups eclipsed the then dominant Apple and helped put a computer in every office.

linux-workgroups.jpg

Image, Linux Foundation via The H Open.

Even Linus Torvalds, the creator and lead maintainer of the Linux Kernel, referred to the notoriety of Windows 3.11 with Linux heading toward 3.11. That version of Linux is now developed under the codename, "Linux for Workgroups". Tux, the penguin mascot of Linux, can be seen waving a retro-fashioned Windows flag. Perhaps in a few decades when they reach version 6, Tux can learn to play the tuba... or some other type of... long... horn.

A little luck is what Linux requires to become adopted by the home PC market. Unlike Windows 3, Linux has been a great operating system for decades. The real problem with Linux is branding, many equate the OS with command-line inputs, or believe that it does not welcome proprietary software into its open gates. Clearly, both statements are untrue: Linux is the foundation for Android and many other popular graphical UIs, and one can easily be against selling a software's right to exist without being against selling the software itself. Otherwise, very few critiques can be justified against Linux.

Readers: What is your favorite "wait for version 3" example, with or without Microsoft?

Source: The H Open

CompuLab Launches SFF Utilite PC Powered By Quad Core ARM Processor

Subject: General Tech, Systems | July 14, 2013 - 11:51 PM |
Tagged: utilite, ubuntu, silent, SFF, linux, fanless, cortex-a9, compulab, arm, Android

CompuLab has announced a new fanless, small form factor PC called the Utilite. This new PC comes from the same company that engineered the MintBox, MintBox 2, and Fit PC series. The Utilite is a low-power desktop PC powered by a quad core ARM Cortex A9 processor and runs either Ubuntu Linux or Google’s Android operating system.

The upcoming Utilite measures 5.3” x 3.9” x 0.8”(135 x 100 x 21mm) and consumes anywhere between 3W and 8W of power depending on the particular hardware configuration. It is designed to be a quiet desktop replacement with plenty of IO.

Compulabs Utilite ARM Desktop PC.jpg

CompuLab will provide single core, dual core, and quad core CPU SKUs. Specifically, the Utilite is powered by a Freescale i.MX6 ARM Cortex-A9 MPCore processor that is clocked at up to 1.2 GHz. Users will be able to further configure the system with up to 4GB of DDR3 1066 MHz memory and a 512GB mSATA SSD. Storage can be further expanded using Micro SD-XC cards (maximum of 128GB per card). The GPU in the SoC is compatible with OpenGL ES 1.1 and 2.0 as well as OpenVG 1.1 and OpenCL EP. It is capable of hardware decoding multi-stream 1080p video in a variety of common formats.

Wireless functionality includes an 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi card and Bluetooth 3.0.

Compulabs Utilite ARM Desktop PC Cortex-A9 MPCore.jpg

The Utilite has a dark gray case with silver front and rear bezels.

The front of the Utilite PC features the following IO options in addition to the power button and indicator LEDs.

  • 1 x USB OTG (Micro USB)
  • 1 x RS232 (ultra mini serial connector)
  • 1 x Micro SD card slot
  • 2 x USB 2.0
  • 2 x 3.5mm audio jacks (line in, line out)

The rear of the PC hosts:

  • 1 x DC power input
  • 1 x Wi-Fi antenna
  • 1 x RS232 (ultra mini serial connector)
  • 2 x USB 2.0
  • 2 x Gigabit Ethernet RJ45 jacks
  • 2 x HDMI video outputs

According to fanless PC guru FanlessTech, CompuLab will be releasing the ARM-powered Utilite mini PC next month with a starting price of $99 and a variety of SKUs with varying amounts of CPU cores, memory, and storage. The Utilite PC is a bit on the expensive side, but this is a system for industrial and enterprise use as well as consumers, and Olivier from FanlessTech notes that build quality should be on par with those goals/industry aims.

Source: Utilite

Linux Kernel 3.10 Adds New Drivers, SSD Caching Framework, Networking Improvements, and More

Subject: General Tech | July 2, 2013 - 04:47 PM |
Tagged: linux, linux kernel, kernel 3.10, linus, bcache, TLP, btrfs, XFS, UVD

Earlier this week, Linus Torvalds officially released an updated Linux kernel with version 3.10. The new kernel bakes in a number of tweaks and new features, including a new SSD caching framework, new drivers and hardware support, networking improvements, and experimental file system tweaks.

Kernel 3.10 features quite a few improvements to storage. The big new feature is bcache, or Black Layer Cache, which is a framework that allows an SSD to acts as a read and write cache for a slower mechanical hard drive. The SSD will cache frequently accessed data to improve read times as well as act as a write cache that will write data bound for the hard drive to the SSD temporarily until a low usage point when the data will finally be written out to the mechanical hard drive.

Additionally, the kernel developers have made tweaks to the btrfs and XFS file systems. For example, XFS can create and store checksums of metadata to reduce errors and verify data integrity. Performance when using btrfs has also been slightly improved.

Driver and hardware support added to kernel 3.10 includes support for the UVD hardware found in AMD Radeon graphics cards from the 4000 series and beyond, and allows for hardware accelerated video decoding. The kernel also supports the GPU in Richland APUs and the acceleration hardware in NVIDIA's Tegra 2 and 3 SoCs. For Intel systems that use HD processor graphics, PCs will be able to wake from standby faster using the 3.10 kernel. There is also support for ARM's big.LITTLE processors, the IR receiver that Apple uses in its Mac computers, and other new and improved drivers with the latest kernel. 

On the networking side of things, kernel 3.10 implements the Tail Loss Probe algorithm which makes improvements to the TCP networking stack and how it deals with lost packets. The new kernel networking stack tweaks reportedly result in up to a 15% reduction in packet retransmission timeouts and 6% shorter HTTP response times.

Aside from these larger changes, kernel 3.10 has a great deal of under-the-hood fixes. For all the nitty-gritty geeky details, the H-Online has put together a detailed breakdown of all the tweaks and new features baked into the latest 3.10 Linux kernel.

For a comparison / breakdown of what the previous 3.9 kernel brought to the table, see this post.