Quantum dots may be screening on your mobile by 2020

Subject: General Tech | July 9, 2014 - 10:38 AM |
Tagged: cellphone, lcd, quantum dots

Research into using quantum dots in LCDs has been ongoing and several breakthroughs at research laboratories have proven that they can provide much a much wider and more accurate colour spectrum than conventional backlit LCDs.  The size of the dot effects the colour, with larger dots fluoresce red, mid-sized dots green and the smallest blue, emulating the familiar spectrum of pixels at a lower energy cost and greater accuracy.  DigiTimes is reporting on the predictions of DisplaySearch which feel that quantum dots will be the next step forward for LCD technology and could represent up to a quarter of the smartphone display market by 2020. 

The technology to incorporate quantum dots into displays is currently available but there are several hurdles which need to be overcome before you can expect to see them in your next mobile device.  First and foremost is the price of manufacturing, as with any new process the first generations are quite expensive to manufacture, even if it is ways to molecularly seed a panel with a tailored particles to produce quantum dots succeeds in large quantities.  Current mass production relies mostly on heavy metals such as Cadmium which are strictly regulated when used in commercial products and would likely not be approved for use in the production of mobile phones in the amounts currently required.  It won't happen in the next few generations of phones but keep your eyes peeled for greatly enhanced LCD panels by the end of the decade.

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"The firm said that the penetration of quantum dots in smartphone TFT LCDs will be 3% in 2015, growing to 26% in 2020. Penetration in tablets will also be relatively high, with nearly 2% penetration in 2015, growing to 15% in 2020. The quantum dot penetration in LCD TVs is expected to be lower, due to the large area of TV displays. DisplaySearch forecasts that less than 1% of LCD TV screens will use quantum dots in 2015, growing to 9% in 2020."

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Source: DigiTimes

ASUS, please offer us an alternative to IPS displays

Subject: Displays | November 20, 2012 - 01:33 PM |
Tagged: asus, PLS, lcd, 2560x1440, PB278Q, 27

Before they even turned the ASUS PB278Q on, Hardware Canucks had formed several opinions about the monitor; on the positive side the stand was very versatile and more stable than other 27" displays but on the negative side was the complete lack of an anti-glare coating.  The OSD was quite comprehensive, especially if you contrast it with some of the  high definition displays from Korea we have seen recently.  The overall performance of monitor was not quite up to the Samsung SyncMaster 27A850 which is another PLS display on the market, however you can get the ASUS display for at least $100 less which may make it the preferred choice of those needing something better than a TN display but can't afford the top model.

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"PLS panel technology hasn't been around for all that long but it has already made a lasting mark upon the display market. ASUS' new PB278Q puts this technology to good use in a 27" 2560 x 1440 WQHD monitor that is targeted towards gamers and professionals alike."

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From Viewers Like You...

About two months ago, a viewer of the podcast that Ryan co-hosts on the This Week in Tech network, This Week in Computer Hardware, wrote in with some information that immediately excited the staff here at PC Perspective. Ryan for a long time has been of the opinion that the proliferation of 1080p displays, and prohibitive cost of high resolution monitors has been holding the industry back as a whole. With talk of 4K displays being introduced for consumers this year, a major topic on the podcast in the weeks prior to this viewer email had centered around why we haven't seen affordable 2560x1440 (or 2560x1600) displays.

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This brings us back to the knowledge which the listener Jeremy bestowed upon us.  Jeremy brought to our attention that various eBay sellers were reselling and exporting generic 27", IPS, LED backlight, 2560x1440 monitors from South Korea. What is remarkable about these displays however is that various models can be found for just around, or even under $350. Everyone listening, including Ryan and his co-host Patrick Norton became immediately interested in these monitors, and I went into research mode.

Continue reading our review of the 27-in Achieva Shimian 2560x1440 monitor!

Samsung Transparent Smart Window Visible At CES

Subject: General Tech | January 12, 2012 - 01:39 PM |
Tagged: touch screen, smart window, Samsung, lcd, CES

Aside from "no compromises," "smart" was the big buzz word at this years CES (Consumer Electronics Show) 2012. Among Samsung's "smart" products on display was a transparent touchscreen LCD monitor that doubles as a window named appropriately enough the Transparent Smart Window. The new concept design can be made transparent to see the world outside or completely opaque using virtual blinds that blank out the window with a window blind closing animation, even. Tested's Will Smith takes a look at the Samsung window in the video below.

The window display can show more than just blinds, however. It is capable of acting as a fully functional LCD display; playing movies, browsing the Internet, and displaying widgets and backgrounds are all possible. At CES, many sites noted the Twitter application and weather widgets for seeing just how much better the weather is elsewhere in the world. As it is just a concept, there were no specific specifications or hardware sets given. Pricing and availability are just as much up in the air (unknown). It is not likely that we will see this exact product come to market. On the other hand, the technology behind the concept device is what is important, and we will likely see it rolled into other future products. One such likely application of this technology would be to finally bring the HUD, or heads up display, to car windshields including image/light enhancement, back-up cameras, car information (speed, warnings, gps, ect), et al.

What other applications of this technology would you like to see come to market?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: CNET

New Solar Cell Enhanced LCDs Could Improve Mobile Device Battery Life

Subject: Displays, Mobile | August 12, 2011 - 01:51 AM |
Tagged: solar cell, mobile, lcd, display

According to Ars Technica, researchers at UCLA announced on Tuesday a new LCD screen containing photovoltaic cells that promises to reduce back-light energy waste and improve battery life on mobile devices.

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My N900 eats up battery with an hour of Angry Birds, but can go for two days with the display off. Where's my happy medium? 

The researchers have placed what they are calling polarizing organic photovoltaics inside the LCDs in such a way that light that is normally filtered out and blocked in areas to create the displayed images can now be (mostly) recovered. While the process does not result in 100% reclamation of energy due to energy loss during the conversion process(es) and heat given off by the back-light, in a mobile device any amount of energy that can be recovered is desirable. Ars Technica states that up to 90% of a battery’s power is used to power the back-light of the display. Further, of that percentage, up to 75% is lost to the polarizing layers. By infusing the polarizing layer with photovoltaic cells and reclaiming as much of the otherwise wasted light as possible, battery life could be dramatically extended.

Mobile devices are getting beefier multi-core processors and graphics chips, numerous wireless radio connections (4G, WiFi, Bluetooth), and large power hungry displays; however, battery technology advancements have been rather stagnant and flat. As a result of this, having to make processors, displays, and other components as efficient as possible to make up the difference of battery technology not keeping up with other advancements, interesting tweaks like the photovoltaic infused displays become that much more important.

Whether this particular technology will catch on and work as well as they claim remains to be seen; however it is nonetheless an interesting experiment. More data on the researchers’ project will be published in the Advanced Materials journal in September 2011. What are your thoughts on the idea?

Source: Ars Technica

Battle the bane of bulging caps, bring back life to your monitor

Subject: General Tech | July 29, 2011 - 08:22 AM |
Tagged: lcd, solder, capacitor, DIY

Over at The Tech Report you will find a handy guide on restoring a monitor with busted caps to working condition, for not much money nor effort. A bit effort is all that you need to track down a dead capacitor on the circuit board, identified by the bulge which will be apparent at the top of the cap.  Once you've found it you just need to desolder it and swap in a new one and your once broken monitor will be working again.  Even better, this procedure can resurrect any peice of equipment you have which is suffering from failed capacitors.  If you've never used a soldering iron to fix something, this would be a great place to start.

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"In his latest blog post, our own David Morgan shows how to bring a monitor back from the dead with a simple capacitor transplant."

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