Huzzah! RAM reviews are much more interesting now

Subject: Memory | September 15, 2014 - 02:17 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyperx predator, DDR4-3000, ddr4

Ah DDR3, it has been a long and fruitful partnership and it is good to know you won't be going anywhere soon but you now have a younger sibling that is attracting a lot of attention.  DDR4 has arrived, with a base clock of 2133MHz and many kits with higher frequencies also appearing for sale.  The ~$350, 16GB Kingston HyperX Predator kit which Legit Reviews just reviewed comes with two XPM profiles, one @ 3000MHz with timings of 15-16-16-39 and one @ 2666MHz at 14-14-14-36 and they also tested the kit @ 2133MHz with the previous timings.  As you read through the review you will notice that the synthetic benchmarks show much more drastic differences than do the gameplay tests, similar to what was seen with DDR3.  As with the previous generation it looks as though tighter timings trump frequency in the majority of cases.

kingston-hyperx-ddr4-645x331.jpg

"Now that the Intel X99 chipset has been released along with the Intel Haswell-E processor series we have entered the era of DDR4 memory. There are many DDR4 memory kits on the market and right now you can find 16GB to 64GB kits of DDR4 memory ranging in speeds of 2133MHz to 3333MHz. The sheer number of kits on the market for the platform launch is rather impressive and luckily there are a good number of Intel X99 based motherboards that are ready to support DDR4 memory frequencies well beyond the JEDEC standard clock frequency of 2133MHz."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Kingston's new HyperX Fury SSD; fool me once ...

Subject: Storage | August 27, 2014 - 01:09 PM |
Tagged: Sandforce SF2281, kingston, hyper x fury, 240gb

The Kingston Hyper X Fury 240GB is a slim SSD able to fit in the anemic ultrabooks though it does ship with a 2.5mm adapter for systems which are a little more meaty.  It uses the familiar Sandforce SF2281 controller and has changed to 128GBit ONFi 3 NAND from the previous ONFi 1 and 2 found in the V300 and the first Fury models.  This NAND is slower at reads but at the same time it is also significantly more rugged, with a endurance rating of 641TB worth of writes.  Hopefully Kingston learned from the reaction to its previous release of the V300 where review models were sent out with Toggle Mode NAND which was then switched for ONFi in the retail models.  Hardware Canucks saw decent performance at a price in line with the market, but it is up to you to decide if you are willing to forgive Kingston and purchase this new SSD.

board1_sm.jpg

"Kingston has long been known as a company that caters to budget-minded buyers and that's exactly what their new HyperX Fury SSD does. However, this time performance is also a priority."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Kingston's multi-talented MobileLite Wireless G2

Subject: Mobile | July 3, 2014 - 11:54 AM |
Tagged: kingston, MobileLite Wireless G2

The Kingston MobileLite Wireless G2 is hard to describe quickly, you can plug memory cards or USB flash drives into it and access them with a wireless device, you can plug in an ethernet cord and use it as a wireless router and you can plug USB devices into it to recharge them.  Often these all in one devices tend towards being able to do several things poorly as opposed to one thing very well but in this case it seems Kingston has pulled it off.  Techgage was not terribly impressed with the features of the software but the utilitarian nature of the interface does keep things simple.

Kingston-MobileLite-Wireless-G2-Package-Contents-680x418.jpg

"There are mobile media readers, and then there’s Kingston’s MobileLite Wireless G2. When not serving files over Wi-Fi, it can accept a wired LAN connection to become a travel router, and it can also use its huge battery to help charge your mobile phone while you’re on-the-go. Who doesn’t love a device that can act as a jack-of-all-trades?"

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

Mobile

Source: Techgage

Some good news on competition for a change; SSDs may be getting cheaper

Subject: General Tech | June 23, 2014 - 10:38 AM |
Tagged: ssd, kingston, Samsung, Intel, sandisk, rumour

If the information provided to DigiTimes is correct we may be in for a price war between SSD manufacturers.  We have seen price drops in flash memory, especially with the advent of TLC and asynchronous flash which have been heartily approved by most enthusiasts.  However there is a chance that in the coming months competition will start driving prices of SSDs down but may have the opposite impact on other products.  Micron is planning on reducing the amount of memory it sells to other companies in order to ramp up its stock of SSDs and SanDisk has jumped into the market with both feet.  You can also expect to see all the major manufacturers start putting out more M.2 drives as adoption of Intel's Z97 board grows.

pricesfalling.jpg

"The SSD industry is heading for fierce price competition as major suppliers, including Micron Technology, Intel, Kingston Technology, SanDisk and Samsung Electronics, are gearing up efforts to outperform others, according to industry sources."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Is it Bait and Switch or not?

Subject: General Tech | June 17, 2014 - 10:59 AM |
Tagged: kingston, pny, ssdnow v300, optima

There is a wee bit of outrage in the community over the internals of Kingston's SSDNow V300 and PNY's Optima SSDs.  In both cases the internals being sold at the moment do not match the internals that were originally benchmarked and people are outraged that the same product with a different model number has changed internals.  The two drives are marketed towards value conscious purchasers and represent two different cases of modifications; Kingston with a flash change and PNY with a controller change.

The complaints against PNY are a little odd, it would seem that the 4-channel SMI 2246en controller was swapped for an 8-channel LSI SandForce SF-2281 with no price change and the only way you can be upset by that is because of a ridiculous level of brand loyalty.  On the other hand Kingston has switched from Synchronous to Asynchronous NAND flash memory which does have a noticeable impact on performance and the stamina of the flash and also happens to be less expensive to manufacture.  If Kingston had left the price as it was originally and specified the use of Synchronous Flash in the V300 series then you would have a good argument that they had intentionally mislead customers.  The reality is that the type of flash was not specified and the price of a 120GB SSDNow V300 has halved since its release which makes this more of a slightly shady product refresh.  It is not the best way to update your product line but considering the specifics of this particular case it really does not show intent to deceive.

If you really want something to be upset about then consider the example provided by The SSD Review; ASUS's swapping out of the SSD in their ZenBook with utterly no warning or price change.  Now that is Bait and Switch!

H_kingstonssdnow.jpg

"It seems that the world of technology has stopped with allegations that some SSD companies are pulling the old ‘bait and switch’ routine in their SSDs by switching off components that many had recognized through initial SSD reviews. We have read several reports and forums, most of which simply repeat the original information, and finally have decided to clarify things just a bit from our perspective. Get ready though as many may not like our viewpoint; it goes against the grain somewhat."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Tech Report's SSD Endurance: The Petabyte Club

Subject: General Tech, Storage | June 16, 2014 - 10:38 PM |
Tagged: ssd, Samsung 840, Samsung, kingston hyper x, kingston, endurance, corsair neutron gtx, corsair

In The Tech Report's ongoing SSD endurance challenge, three SSDs are soldiering forward. We have reached the thousand-terabyte mark, which is at least five times more than any of the survivors are rated for. These survivors: The Corsair Neutron GTX, the Samsung 840 Pro, and the Kingston HyperX 3K. Technically, the HyperX was able to reach 1PB of written data with performing only 716TB of actual writes, due to compression.

techreport-endurance-1000tb-speed.gif

Image Credit: The Tech Report

Of course, each of the drives are less-than prestine. The Corsair Neutron GTX 240GB was slowly decreasing in its "life" attribute since the beginning, claiming to be somewhere between 75% and 80% with a fairly linear decline. If this trend continues, the drive will reach "zero" at around 4-5PB of writes. That said, its read speed has substantially dropped from the time between 900TB and 1000TB of total writes, from 500MB/s to just under 400MB/s. Also, this "life" could drop substantially if the drive encounters reallocated sectors (which this model has apparently yet to do).

The other two drives are a similar, remarkably successful story.

The Kingston HyperX drive is reporting itself to be substantially worse off, within the last 10% of its life. That said, even though it claims to be pining for the fjords, it is still working and has only reported a couple of reallocated sectors, those occurring in the last 100TB of writes.

The Samsung 840 Pro seems to still be going strong, although it had more zero or "a couple" of reallocated sectors -- every hundred terabytes yields about 500 reallocations.

As always, this is just our brief discussion of what The Tech Report found out. Be sure to check out their full article for many more benchmarks, tests, and conclusions.

Source: Tech Report

Kingston Sees Sales Growth in PC Hardware

Subject: General Tech, Memory, Storage | June 9, 2014 - 08:08 PM |
Tagged: kingston, ssd, hyperx

Kingston, known primarily for RAM, flash drives, and SSDs, discussed the health of their company. VR-Zone reported on the interview and highlighted the company's sentiments about the PC industry. Long story short, Kingston sees growth in sales of PC gaming hardware -- apparently 20% year-over-year. The company expects that this growth comes primarily from SSD upgrades, either from rotating media or, they claim, replacing years-old, entry-level SSDs with more modern (probably in both speed and size) options.

kingston-hx.jpg

Nathan Su, APAC (Asia-Pacific) director of Kingston, believes that "many users" have experienced low-tier SSDs and, it seems, would be willing to invest in the full thing. He does not clarify what he means, whether he is talking about SSD caching, or just a really small (or slow) SSDs from drive generations past.

There is a bit of a concern that SSD prices will continue to fall, with some drives reaching under 40c/GB in recent sales. As a consumer, I (selfishly) hope that prices continue to drop, while still remaining profitably sustainable for the manufacturers. Hopefully Kingston is accounting for this and will continue to see growth at the same time.

Source: VR-Zone

Kingston Digital Releases Larger Capacity mSATA Drives

Subject: Storage | April 22, 2014 - 11:24 AM |
Tagged: kingston, msata, ssdnow, SandForce SF-2241, SandForce SF-2281, ssd

Fountain Valley, CA – April 21, 2014 – Kingston Digital, Inc., the Flash memory affiliate of Kingston Technology Company, Inc., the independent world leader in memory products, today announced the addition of 240GB and 480GB capacities to the existing SSDNow mS200 mSATA SSD line. Kingston’s SSDNow mS200 mSATA solid-state drive allows system builders and enthusiasts a cost-effective performance boost with quicker boot time and application loads while requiring less power than HDDs.

The mS200’s small-form factor is perfect for notebook, tablet and Ultrabook PCs, as well as a variety of embedded systems. It can also be used as a caching device with motherboards that support Intel Smart Response Technology (SRT) to improve system performance. mS200 has read speeds up to 550MB/s and write speeds up to 520MB/s.

The 30GB, 60GB, 120GB, 240GB and 480GB mS200 mSATA SSDs have a caseless, PCB-only design with no moving parts and are backed by a two- or three-year warranty, free technical support and legendary Kingston reliability. For more information visit www.kingston.com.

unnamed.jpg

Features & Specifications:

  • LSI SandForce 2241 (30GB, 60GB, 120GB) and 2281 (240GB, 480GB) controller with SATA Rev. 3.0 (6Gb/s) interface: twice as fast as the previous generation, yet more cost-efficient 
  • mSATA interface: fully compliant with industry standard, easy to fit, guaranteed to work 
  • NAND Flash memory based: shock-resistant with low power consumption
  • Supports Intel’s SRT: combines capacity advantage of HDD with performance improvements of SSD in dual-storage configuration
  • Supports S.M.A.R.T.: monitors the status of your drive
  • Supports TRIM: maintains maximum performance on compatible operating systems
  • Interface: SATA Rev. 3.0 (6Gb/s), SATA Rev. 2.0 (3Gb/s), SATA Rev. 1.0 (1.5Gb/s) ·
  • Capacities1: 30GB, 60GB, 120GB, 240GB, 480GB
  • Automatic Encryption (AES 128-bit):Password at the drive level ensures secure data protection
  • Sequential Read/Write2:
    • 30GB – 550 MB/s / 510MB/s
    • 60GB – 550 MB/s / 520MB/s
    • 120GB – 550MB/s / 520MB/s
    • 240GB – 540MB/s / 530MB/s
    • 480GB – 530MB/s / 340MB/s ·
  • Maximum 4k Read/Write2:
    • 30GB – up to 86,000/ up to 77,000 IOPS
    • 60GB – up to 86,000/ up to 79,000 IOPS
    • 120GB – up to 86,000/ up to 48,000 IOPS
    • 240GB – up to 72,000/up to 40,000 IOPS
    • 480GB – up to 72,000/up to 18,000 IOPS ·
  • Random 4k Read/Write2:
    • 30GB – up to 7,500/71,000 IOPS
    • 60GB – up to 14,000/77,000 IOPS
    • 120GB – up to 17,000/45,000 IOPS
    • 240GB – up to 21,000/41,000 IOPS
    • 480GB – up to 21,000/13,000 IOPS
  • PCMARK® Vantage HDD Suite Score: 60,000
  • Power Consumption: 0.4W Idle / 1.2 (TYP) Read / 1.8W (TYP) Write
  • Storage temperature: -40°C ~ 85°C
  • Operating temperature: 0°C ~ 70°C
  • Dimensions: 50.88mm x 30mm 
  • Weight: 6.86g
  • TRIM Supported
  • Vibration operating: 2.17G
  • Vibration non-operating: 20G
  • MTTF: 1,000,000 Hrs
  • Warranty/support:
    • 30GB – two-year warranty with free technical support
    • 60GB, 120GB, 240GB, 480GB – three-year warranty with free technical support 
  • Total Bytes Written (TBW)3:
    • 30GB: 121TB 3 DWPD4
    • 60GB: 218TB 3 DWPD4
    • 120GB: 337TBW 2 DWPD4
    • 240GB: 585TBW 2 DWPD4
    • 480GB: 1562TBW 2 DWPD4

1 Some of the listed capacity on a Flash storage device is used for formatting and other functions and thus is not available for data storage. As such, the actual available capacity for data storage is less than what is listed on the products. For more information, go to Kingston's Flash Memory Guide.
2 Based on “out-of-box performance.” Speed may vary due to host hardware, software and usage.
3 Total Bytes Written (TBW) is derived from the JEDEC Workload (JESD219A).
4 Drive Writes Per Day (DWPD)

Source: Kingston
Subject: Memory
Manufacturer: Kingston

Ultra-Speed RAM, APU-Style

In our review of the Kingston HyperX Predator 2666MHz kit, we discovered what those knowledgeable about Intel memory scaling already knew: for most applications, and specifically games, there is no significant advantage to increases in memory speed past the current 1600MHz DDR3 standard.  But this was only half of the story. What about memory scaling with an AMD processor, and specifically an APU? To find out, we put AMD’s top APU, the A10-7850K, to the test!

apu_components_1.jpg

Ready for some APU memory testing!

The APU

AMD has created a compelling option with their APU lineup, and the inclusion of powerful integrated graphics allows for interesting build options with lower power and space requirements, and even make building tiny mini-ITX systems for gaming realistic. It’s this graphical prowess compared to any other onboard solution that creates an interesting value proposition for any gamer looking at a new low-cost build. The newest Kaveri APU’s are getting a lot of attention and they beg the question, is a discrete graphics card really needed for gaming at reasonable settings?

Continue reading our article on using high speed DDR3 memory with AMD APUs!!

Shave another couple of watts off your Kabini system

Subject: Memory | April 9, 2014 - 03:54 PM |
Tagged: kingston, kingston hyper x, Genesis LoVo, 16GB, ddr3-1600

If you were impressed by the low wattage required to run the AMD AM1 Athlon 5350 and are thinking of building a low power system along the lines of the one Josh used in his review Kingston has a product to help you lower that total system voltage a little more.  HyperX Genesis LoVo uses only a mere 1.35V to power the 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9 kit and their low profile helps if you are building a small sized system.  Performance at stock speeds is quite decent, with the possibility of overclocking to add more speed if you desire but these DIMMs are more about power savings than raw power.  Check out the full review at Funky Kit.

Kingston_LoVo_pht2.jpg

"Even though higher clocked RAM is great for overclocking and gaming for most computer users, memory at lower clocks is good enough for the general tasks they perform daily. For those users, memory speed is usually less important than capacity so today we wish to present something more regular in the memory's world what is Kingston HyperX Genesis LoVo 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9. As probably some readers already noticed, we can't really call it regular memory as Kingston specified it to run at low voltage of 1.35V ... and it's green like most eco-friendly products."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Funky Kit