Know someone who uses Kaspersky Internet Security that is having trouble today?

Subject: General Tech | March 11, 2013 - 02:27 PM |
Tagged: Kaspersky Labs, patch

It would seem that a single specially malformed IPv6 packet is enough to completely lock up a PC protected by several versions of Kaspersky Internet Security.  There is currently a private patch available for machines suffering from this issue and there will be an official patch pushed out in the very near future.  According to The Register this flaw was originally reported to Kaspersky in January but as they had not released a patch the original discoverer of the flaw has gone public, which was obviously what it took to get them to fix the issue.  If you run into problematic PCs over the next few days you might want to check for Kaspersky Labs software before you really get into troubleshooting.

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"After receiving feedback from the researcher, Kaspersky Lab quickly fixed the error. A private patch is currently available on demand and an autopatch will soon be released to fix the problem automatically on every computer protected by Kaspersky Internet Security 2013."

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Source: The Register

This new malware goes straight to your RAM, no installation required

Subject: General Tech | March 19, 2012 - 11:58 AM |
Tagged: Virus, Trojan-Spy.Win32.Lurk, ram virus, Kaspersky Labs, javaw.exe, fud

A lovely little electronic beastie was spotted by Kaspersky Labs on Russian ad servers recently which uses a Java exploit (long since patched) to corrupt javaw.exe while it is running on system memory, infecting machines without any installation required whatsoever.  While this sounds quite bad, the fact is that in your memory it can infect running programs but not move out of the memory without triggering an installation process and will not survive a system reboot.  That is why as soon as this malware finds its self on a systems RAM it immediately tries to install the Lurk Trojan, which is when your problems would start and when your anti-virus/anti-malware protection should notice something amiss. 

By its self the new virus poses little direct risk but it represents a new attack vector for drive by infections, which could get into protected space and be able to launch an attack from within the systems memory, a much faster and more intimate way of attacking than coming over the network.  With home systems sporting more that 4GB of RAM, there is a lot more space for this type of virus to work with than there was just a few years ago.  Read on at The Register, if you dare.

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"The researchers aren’t quite sure how unusual it is, describing it as both “unique” and “very rare”, but no matter how scarce this type of malware is it does sound rather nasty as it “… uses its payload to inject an encrypted dll from the web directly into the memory of the javaw.exe process.” That mode of operation means Windows and MacOS are both affected by the exploit, which is hard for many antivirus programs to spot given it runs within a trusted process."

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Source: The Register