Enter Tegra K1 CUDA Vision Challenge, Win Jetson TK1

Subject: General Tech | April 25, 2014 - 10:43 AM |
Tagged: nvidia, contest, jetson tk1, kepler

Attention enthusiasts, developers and creators. Are you working on a new embedded computing application?

Meet the Jetson TK1 Developer Kit. It’s the world’s first mobile supercomputer for embedded systems, putting unprecedented computing performance in a low-power, portable and fully programmable package.

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Power, ports, and portability: the Jetson TK1 development kit.The Jetson TK1 development kit

It’s the ultimate platform for developing next-generation computer vision solutions for robotics, medical devices, and automotive applications.

And we’re giving away 50 of them as part of our Tegra K1 CUDA Vision Challenge.

In addition to the Tegra K1 processor, the Jetson TK1 DevKit is equipped with 2 GB of RAM, 16 GB of storage and a host of ports and connectivity options.

And, because it offers full support for CUDA, the most pervasive, easy-to-use parallel computing platform and programming model, it’s much easier to program than the FPGA, custom ASIC and DSP processors that are typically used in today’s embedded systems.

Jetson TK1 is based on the Kepler computing architecture, the same technology powering today’s supercomputers, professional workstations and high-end gaming rigs. It has 192 CUDA cores, delivering over 300 GFLOPs of performance, and also provides full support for OpenGL 4.4, and CUDA 6.0, as well as the GPU-accelerated OpenCV.

Our Tegra K1 system-on-a-chip offers unprecedented power and portability.Our Tegra K1 system-on-a-chip offers unprecedented power and portability.

Entering the Tegra K1 CUDA Vision Challenge is easy. Just tell us about your embedded application idea. All proposals must be submitted April 30, 2014. Entries will be judged for innovation, impact on research or industry, public availability, and quality of work.

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By the end of May, the top 50 submissions will be awarded one of the first Jetson TK1 DevKits to roll off the production line, as well as access to technical support documents and assets.

The five most noteworthy Jetson TK1 breakthroughs may get a chance to share their work at the NVIDIA GPU Technology Conference in 2015.

Source: NVIDIA

NVIDIA Launches Jetson TK1 Mobile CUDA Development Platform

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | March 25, 2014 - 06:34 PM |
Tagged: GTC 2014, tegra k1, nvidia, CUDA, kepler, jetson tk1, development

NVIDIA recently unified its desktop and mobile GPU lineups by moving to a Kepler-based GPU in its latest Tegra K1 mobile SoC. The move to the Kepler architecture has simplified development and enabled the CUDA programming model to run on mobile devices. One of the main points of the opening keynote earlier today was ‘CUDA everywhere,’ and NVIDIA has officially accomplished that goal by having CUDA compatible hardware from servers to desktops to tablets and embedded devices.

Speaking of embedded devices, NVIDIA showed off a new development board called the Jetson TK1. This tiny new board features a NVIDIA Tegra K1 SoC at its heart along with 2GB RAM and 16GB eMMC storage. The Jetson TK1 supports a plethora of IO options including an internal expansion port (GPIO compatible), SATA, one half-mini PCI-e slot, serial, USB 3.0, micro USB, Gigabit Ethernet, analog audio, and HDMI video outputs.

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Of course the Tegra K1 part is a quad core (4+1) ARM CPU and a Kepler-based GPU with 192 CUDA cores. The SoC is rated at 326 GFLOPS which enables some interesting compute workloads including machine vision.

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In fact, Audi has been utilizing the Jetson TK1 development board to power its self-driving prototype car (more on that soon). Other intended uses for the new development board include robotics, medical devices, security systems, and perhaps low power compute clusters (such as an improved Pedraforca system).It can also be used as a simple desktop platform for testing and developing mobile applications for other Tegra K1 powered devices, of course.

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Beyond the hardware, the Jetson TK1 comes with the CUDA toolkit, OpenGL 4.4 driver, and NVIDIA VisionWorks SDK which includes programming libraries and sample code for getting machine vision applications running on the Tegra K1 SoC.

The Jetson TK1 is available for pre-order now at $192 and is slated to begin shipping in April. Interested developers can find more information on the NVIDIA developer website.