Microsoft DirectX 12 Live Blog Recap

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 21, 2014 - 02:25 PM |
Tagged: dx12, DirectX, DirectX 12, GDC, gdc 14, nvidia, Intel, amd, qualcomm, live, live blog

We had some requests for a permanent spot for the live blog images and text from this week's GDC 14 DirectX 12 reveal.  Here it is included below!!

  Microsoft DirectX 12 Announcement Live Blog (03/20/2014) 
9:53
Ryan Shrout: 

Hi everyone!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:53 Ryan Shrout
9:53
Ryan Shrout: 

We are just about ready to get started - people are filing in now.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:53 Ryan Shrout
9:53
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

?video

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:53 Guest
9:53
Ryan Shrout: 

Sorry, no video for this. They wouldn't allow us to record or stream.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:53 Ryan Shrout
9:55
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

kk, no worries

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:55 Guest
9:55
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

Pictures?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:55 Guest
9:55
Ryan Shrout: 

Yup!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:55 Ryan Shrout
9:59
Ryan Shrout: 

Just testing out photos. I promise the others will be more clear.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:59 Ryan Shrout
9:59
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 9:59 
10:00
[Comment From SebastianSebastian: ] 

Looks like it's a very small event

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:00 Sebastian
10:00
Ryan Shrout: 

The room is much smaller than it should be. Line was way too long for a room like this.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:00 Ryan Shrout
10:01
Josh Walrath: 

that is a super small room for such an event. Especially considering the online demand for details!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:01 Josh Walrath
10:02
Ryan Shrout
 
Qualcomm's Eric Demers, AMD's Raja Koduri, NVIDIA's Tony Tamasi.
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:02 
10:03
Ryan Shrout: 

And we are starting!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:03 Ryan Shrout
10:03
Josh Walrath: 

Have those boys gotten their knives out yet. Are the press circling them and snapping their fingers?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:03 Josh Walrath
10:03
Ryan Shrout: 

Going over a history of DX.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:03 Ryan Shrout
10:03
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:03 
10:04
Ryan Shrout: 

Talking about the development process.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:04 Ryan Shrout
10:04
Ryan Shrout: 

All partner base.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:04 Ryan Shrout
10:04
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:04 
10:05
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

why cant I comment ?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:05 Guest
10:05
Ryan Shrout: 

GPU performance is "embarrassing parallel" statement here.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:05 Ryan Shrout
10:05
Scott Michaud: 

You can, we just need to publish them. And there's *a lot* of comments.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:05 Scott Michaud
10:05
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:05 
10:05
Josh Walrath: 

We see everything, Peter.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:05 Josh Walrath
10:05
Ryan Shrout: 

CPU performance has not improved at the same rate. This difference rate of increase is a big challenge for DX.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:05 Ryan Shrout
10:06
Ryan Shrout: 

Third point has been a challenge, until now.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:06 Ryan Shrout
10:07
Ryan Shrout: 

What do developers want? List similar to what AMD presented with Mantle.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:07 Ryan Shrout
10:07
Ryan Shrout: 

DX12 "is no dot release"

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:07 Ryan Shrout
10:08
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:08 
10:08
Ryan Shrout: 

It faster, more direct. ha ha.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:08 Ryan Shrout
10:08
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:08 
10:08
Ryan Shrout: 

Xbox One games will see improved performance. Coming to all MS platforms. PC, mobile too.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:08 Ryan Shrout
10:08
Josh Walrath: 

Oh look, mobile!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:08 Josh Walrath
10:09
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:09 
10:09
Ryan Shrout: 

New tools are a requirement.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:09 Ryan Shrout
10:09
Josh Walrath: 

We finally have a MS answer to OpenGL ES.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:09 Josh Walrath
10:09
Scott Michaud: 

Hmm, none of the four pictures in the bottom is a desktop or Laptop.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:09 Scott Michaud
10:09
Ryan Shrout: 

D3D 12 is the first version to go much lower level.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:09 Ryan Shrout
10:09
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

The last one is a desktop...

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:09 Guest
10:10
Scott Michaud: 

Huh, thought it was TV. My mistake.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:10 Scott Michaud
10:10
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:10 
10:10
Ryan Shrout: 

Yeah, desktop PC is definitely on the list here guys.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:10 Ryan Shrout
10:11
Ryan Shrout: 

Going to show us some prototypes.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:11 Ryan Shrout
10:11
Ryan Shrout: 

Ported latest 3DMark.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:11 Ryan Shrout
10:12
Ryan Shrout: 

In DX11, one core is doing most of the work.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:12 Ryan Shrout
10:12
Ryan Shrout: 

on d3d12, overall CPU utilization is down 50%

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:12 Ryan Shrout
10:13
Ryan Shrout: 

Also, the workload is more spread out.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:13 Ryan Shrout
10:13
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:13 
10:13
Ryan Shrout: 

Interesting data for you all!!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:13 Ryan Shrout
10:13
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:13 
10:14
Ryan Shrout: 

Grouping entire pipeline state into state objects. These can be mapped very efficiently to GPU hardware.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:14 Ryan Shrout
10:14
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:14 
10:15
Ryan Shrout: 

"Solved" multi-threaded scalability.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:15 Ryan Shrout
10:15
Scott Michaud: 

Hmm, from ~8ms to ~4. That's an extra 4ms for the GPU to work. 20 GFLOPs for a GeForce Titan.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:15 Scott Michaud
10:15
[Comment From JayJay: ] 

Multicore Scalability.... Seems like a big deal when you have 6-8 cores!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:15 Jay
10:16
Josh Walrath: 

It is a big deal for the CPU guys.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:16 Josh Walrath
10:16
Ryan Shrout: 

D3D12 allows apps to control graphics memory better.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:16 Ryan Shrout
10:16
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:16 
10:17
Ryan Shrout: 

API is now much lower level. Application tracks pipeline status, not the API.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:17 Ryan Shrout
10:17
[Comment From JimJim: ] 

20 GFlops from a Titan? Stock Titan gets around 5 ATM.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:17 Jim
10:17
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:17 
10:18
Ryan Shrout: 

Less API and driver tracking universally. More more predictability.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:18 Ryan Shrout
10:18
Ryan Shrout: 

This is targeted at the smartest developers, but gives you unprecedented performance.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:18 Ryan Shrout
10:18
Ryan Shrout: 

Also planning to advance state of rendering features. Feature level 12.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:18 Ryan Shrout
10:19
Scott Michaud: 

Titan gets around ~5 Teraflops, actually... if it is fully utilized. I'm saying that an extra 4ms is an extra 20 GFlops per frame.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:19 Scott Michaud
10:19
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:19 
10:19
Josh Walrath: 

Titan is around 5 TFlops total, that 20 GFLOPS is potential performance in the time gained by optimizations.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:19 Josh Walrath
10:19
Ryan Shrout: 

Better collision and culling

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:19 Ryan Shrout
10:19
Ryan Shrout: 

Constantly working with GPU vendors to find new ways to render.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:19 Ryan Shrout
10:20
Ryan Shrout: 

Forza 5 on stage now. Strictly console developer.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:20 Ryan Shrout
10:20
[Comment From Lewap PawelLewap Pawel: ] 

So 20GFLOPS per frame is 20x60 = 1200GFLOPS/sec? 20% improvement?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:20 Lewap Pawel
10:21
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:21 
10:21
Scott Michaud: 

Not quite, because we don't know how many FPS we had originally.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:21 Scott Michaud
10:21
Ryan Shrout: 

Talking about porting the game to D3D12

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:21 Ryan Shrout
10:22
Ryan Shrout: 

4 man-months effort to port core rendering engine.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:22 Ryan Shrout
10:22
Ryan Shrout: 

Demo time!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:22 Ryan Shrout
10:22
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:22 
10:22
Ryan Shrout: 

Rendering at static 60 FPS.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:22 Ryan Shrout
10:23
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:23 
10:23
Ryan Shrout: 

Bundles allows for instancing but with variance.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:23 Ryan Shrout
10:24
Ryan Shrout: 

Resource lifetime, track memory directly. No longer have D3D tracking that lifetime, much cheaper on resources.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:24 Ryan Shrout
10:24
Ryan Shrout: 

"It's all up to us, and that's how we like it."

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:24 Ryan Shrout
10:24
Ryan Shrout: 

Does anyone else here worry that DX12 might leave out some smaller devs that can't go so low level?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:24 Ryan Shrout
10:25
Josh Walrath: 

I would say that depends on the quality of tools that MS provides, as well as IHV support.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:25 Josh Walrath
10:25
Scott Michaud: 

Not really, for me. The reason why they can go so much lower these days is because what is lower is more consistent.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:25 Scott Michaud
10:26
Ryan Shrout: 

And now back to info. Will you have to buy new hardware? I would say no since they just showed Xbox One... lol

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:26 Ryan Shrout
10:26
[Comment From killeakkilleak: ] 

Small devs will use an Engine, not make their own.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:26 killeak
10:26
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:26 
10:26
Ryan Shrout: 

On stage now is Raja Koduri from AMD.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:26 Ryan Shrout
10:27
Scott Michaud: 

Not true at all, actually. Just look at Frictional (Amnesia). They made their own engine tailored for what their game needed.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:27 Scott Michaud
10:27
Ryan Shrout: 

AMD has been working very closely with DX12. Heh.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:27 Ryan Shrout
10:27
Josh Walrath: 

Shocking!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:27 Josh Walrath
10:28
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:28 
10:28
Josh Walrath: 

Strike a pose!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:28 Josh Walrath
10:28
Ryan Shrout: 

There is tension: AMD is trying to push hw forward, MS is trying to push their platform forward.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:28 Ryan Shrout
10:28
Ryan Shrout: 

Very honest assessment of the current setup between AMD, NVIDIA, MS.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:28 Ryan Shrout
10:28
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

Scott, with the recent changes with CryEngine, UE4 going subscription based more Indies might just go that route.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:28 Guest
10:28
Ryan Shrout: 

DX12 is an area where they had the least tension in Raja's history in this field.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:28 Ryan Shrout
10:29
Scott Michaud: 

Definitely. But that is not the same thing as saying that indies will not make their own engine.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:29 Scott Michaud
10:29
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:29 
10:29
Ryan Shrout: 

Key is that current users get benefit with this API on day 1.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:29 Ryan Shrout
10:29
Ryan Shrout: 

"Like getting 4 generations of hardware ahead."

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:29 Ryan Shrout
10:29
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:29 
10:31
Josh Walrath: 

That answers a few of the burning questions!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:31 Josh Walrath
10:31
Ryan Shrout: 

Up now is Eric Mentzer from Intel.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:31 Ryan Shrout
10:31
[Comment From KevKev: ] 

Thank you! Great news guys!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:31 Kev
10:31
Scott Michaud: 

You're welcome! : D

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:31 Scott Michaud
10:32
[Comment From JimJim: ] 

OH, intel and AMD in the same room....

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:32 Jim
10:32
Scott Michaud: 

Intel, AMD, NVIDIA, and Qualcomm in the same room...

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:32 Scott Michaud
10:32
Ryan Shrout: 

Intel has made big change in graphics; put a lot more focus on it with tech and process tech.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:32 Ryan Shrout
10:32
Josh Walrath: 

DX12 will enhance any modern graphics chip. Driver support from IHVs will be key to enable those features. This is a massive change in how DX addresses the GPU, rather than (so far) the GPU adding features.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:32 Josh Walrath
10:32
[Comment From GuestGuest: ] 

so this means xbox one will get a performance boost?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:32 Guest
10:32
Scott Michaud: 

Yes

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:32 Scott Michaud
10:33
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:33 
10:33
Scott Michaud: 

According to "Benefits of Direct3D 12 will extend to Xbox One", at least.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:33 Scott Michaud
10:33
Ryan Shrout: 

Intel commits to having Haswell support DX12 at launch.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:33 Ryan Shrout
10:34
Ryan Shrout: 

BTW - thanks to everyone for stopping by the live blog!! :)

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:34 Ryan Shrout
10:34
Josh Walrath: 

Just to reiterate... PS4 utilizes OpenGL, not DX. This change will not affect PS4. Changes to OpenGL will only improve PS4 performance.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:34 Josh Walrath
10:34
Ryan Shrout: 

If you like this kind of stuff, check out our weekly podcast! http://pcper.com/podcast

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:34 Ryan Shrout
10:34
Ryan Shrout: 

No mention of actual DX12 launch time quite yet...

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:34 Ryan Shrout
10:34
[Comment From MagnarockMagnarock: ] 

Finish?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:34 Magnarock
10:34
Ryan Shrout: 

And Intel is gone. Short and sweet.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:34 Ryan Shrout
10:34
Scott Michaud: 

Still have NVIDIA and Qualcomm, at least.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:34 Scott Michaud
10:35
Scott Michaud: 

So -- not finished.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:35 Scott Michaud
10:35
Ryan Shrout: 

Up next is Tony Tamasi from NVIDIA.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:35 Ryan Shrout
10:35
Ryan Shrout: 

NVIDIA has been working with MS since the inception of DX12. Still don't know when that is...

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:35 Ryan Shrout
10:35
[Comment From AlexAlex: ] 

PS4 doesn't use OpenGL, but custom APIs instead...

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:35 Alex
10:35
Scott Michaud: 

True, it's not actually OpenGL... but is heavily heavily based on OpenGL.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:35 Scott Michaud
10:36
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:36 
10:36
Ryan Shrout: 

They think it should be done with standards so there is no fragmentation.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:36 Ryan Shrout
10:36
Ryan Shrout: 

lulz.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:36 Ryan Shrout
10:37
Scott Michaud: 

Because everything that ends in "x" is all about no fragmentation :p

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:37 Scott Michaud
10:37
Ryan Shrout: 

NVIDIA will support DX12 on Fermi, Kepler, Maxwell and forward!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:37 Ryan Shrout
10:37
Ryan Shrout: 

For developers that want to get down deep and manage all of this, DX12 is going to be really exciting.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:37 Ryan Shrout
10:38
Ryan Shrout: 

NVIDIA represents about 55% of the install base.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:38 Ryan Shrout
10:38
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:38 
10:38
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:38 
10:39
Ryan Shrout: 

Developers already have DX12 drivers. The Forza demo was running on NVIDIA!!!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:39 Ryan Shrout
10:39
Ryan Shrout: 

Holy crap, that wasn't on an Xbox One!!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:39 Ryan Shrout
10:39
Scott Michaud: 

Fermi and forward... aligning well with the start of their compute-based architectures... using IEEE standards (etc). Makes perfect sense. Also might help explain why pre-Fermi is deprecated after GeForce 340 drivers...

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:39 Scott Michaud
10:40
Ryan Shrout: 

Support quote from Tim Sweeney.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:40 Ryan Shrout
10:41
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:41 
10:41
[Comment From CrackolaCrackola: ] 

Any current NVIDIA cards DX12 ready? Titan, etc?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:41 Crackola
10:41
Ryan Shrout: 

Up now is Eric Demers from Qualcomm.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:41 Ryan Shrout
10:42
Scott Michaud: 

NVIDIA said Fermi, Kepler, and Maxwell will be DX12-ready. So like... almost everything since GeForce 400... almost.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:42 Scott Michaud
10:42
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:42 
10:42
Ryan Shrout: 

Qualcomm has been working with MS on mobile graphics since there WAS mobile graphics.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:42 Ryan Shrout
10:42
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:42 
10:42
Ryan Shrout: 

Most windows phones are powered by Snapdragon.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:42 Ryan Shrout
10:42
Josh Walrath: 

We currently don't know what changes in Direct3D will be brought to the table, all we are seeing here is how they are changing the software stack to more efficiently use modern GPUs. This does not mean that all current DX11 hardware will fully support the DX12 specification when it comes to D3D, Direct Compute, etc.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:42 Josh Walrath
10:43
Ryan Shrout: 

DX12 will improve power efficiency by reducing overhead.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:43 Ryan Shrout
10:43
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:43 
10:44
Ryan Shrout: 

Perf will improve on mobile device as well, of course. But gaming for longer periods on battery life is biggest draw.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:44 Ryan Shrout
10:45
Ryan Shrout: 

Portability - bringing titles from the PC to Xbox to mobile platform will be much easier.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:45 Ryan Shrout
10:45
[Comment From David UyDavid Uy: ] 

I think all Geforce 400 series is Fermi. so - Geforce 400 and above.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:45 David Uy
10:45
Scott Michaud: 

I think the GeForce 405 is the only exception...

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:45 Scott Michaud
10:45
Ryan Shrout: 

Off goes Eric.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:45 Ryan Shrout
10:45
Ryan Shrout: 

MS back on stage.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:45 Ryan Shrout
10:46
Ryan Shrout: 

And now a group picture lol.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:46 Ryan Shrout
10:46
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:46 
10:47
Ryan Shrout: 

By the time they ship, 50% of all PC gamers will be DX12 capable.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:47 Ryan Shrout
10:47
Ryan Shrout: 

Ouch, targeting Holiday 2015 games.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:47 Ryan Shrout
10:48
Ryan Shrout: 

Early access coming later this year.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:48 Ryan Shrout
10:48
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:48 
10:48
Josh Walrath: 

Yeah, this is a pretty big sea change.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:48 Josh Walrath
10:48
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:48 
10:49
Ryan Shrout
 
 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:49 
10:49
Scott Michaud: 

50% of PC Gamers sounds like they're projecting NOT Windows 7.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:49 Scott Michaud
10:49
Ryan Shrout: 

They are up for Q&A not sure how informative they will be...

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:49 Ryan Shrout
10:50
Josh Walrath: 

OS support? Extension changes to D3D/Direct Compute?

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:50 Josh Walrath
10:50
Ryan Shrout: 

Windows 7 support? Won't be announcing anything today but they understand the request.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:50 Ryan Shrout
10:51
Ryan Shrout: 

Q: What about support for multi-GPU? They will have a way to target specific GPUs in a system.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:51 Ryan Shrout
10:51
Ryan Shrout: 

This session is wrapping up for now!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:51 Ryan Shrout
10:51
Ryan Shrout: 

Looks like we are light on details but we'll be catching more sessions today so check back on http://www.pcper.com/

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:51 Ryan Shrout
10:52
Scott Michaud: 

"a way to target specific GPUs in a system" this sounds like developers can program their own Crossfire/SLi methods, like OpenCL and Mantle.

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:52 Scott Michaud
10:52
Ryan Shrout: 

Also, again, if you want more commentary on DX12 and PC hardware, check out our weekly podcast! http://www.pcper.com/podcast!

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:52 Ryan Shrout
10:52
Ryan Shrout: 

Thanks everyone for joining us! We MIGHT live blog the other sessions today, so you can sign up for our mailing list to find out when we go live. http://www.pcper.com/subscribe

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:52 Ryan Shrout
10:57
Scott Michaud: 

Apparently NVIDIA's blog says DX12 discussion begun more than four years ago "with discussions about reducing resource overhead". They worked for a year to deliver "a working design and implementation of DX12 at GDC".

 
 
Thursday March 20, 2014 10:57 Scott Michaud
11:03
 

 
 
 

 

Subject: Editorial, Storage
Manufacturer: Intel

Introduction and Background

Introduction:

Back in 2010, Intel threw a bit of a press thing for a short list of analysts and reviewers out at their IMFT flash memory plant at Lehi, Utah. The theme and message of that event was to announce 25nm flash entering mass production. A few years have passed, and 25nm flash is fairly ubiquitous, with 20nm rapidly gaining as IMFT scales production even higher with the smaller process. Last week, Intel threw a similar event, but instead of showing off a die shrink or even announcing a new enthusiast SSD, they chose to take a step back and brief us on the various design, engineering, and validation testing of their flash storage product lines.

heisman-cropped.jpg

At the Lehi event, I did my best to make off with a 25nm wafer.

Many topics were covered at this new event at the Intel campus at Folsom, CA, and over the coming weeks we will be filling you in on many of them as we take the necessary time to digest the fire hose of intel (pun intended) that we received. Today I'm going to lay out one of the more impressive things I saw at the briefings, and that is the process Intel goes through to ensure their products are among the most solid and reliable in the industry.

Read on for more on how Intel tests their products!

Podcast #292 - Haswell-E, Iris Pro in Broadwell, our 750 Ti Roundup and more!

Subject: General Tech | March 20, 2014 - 04:05 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, gdc14, haswell, Haswell-E, Broadwell, devil's canyon, Intel, amd, Mantle, dx12, nvidia, gtx 750ti, evga, pny, galaxy

PC Perspective Podcast #292 - 03/20/2014

Join us this week as we discuss Haswell-E, Iris Pro in Broadwell, our 750 Ti Roundup and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

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Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath and Allyn Malventano

 
This podcast is brought to you by Coolermaster, and the CM Storm Pulse-R Gaming Headset!
 
Program length: 1:32:09
 
  1. Week in Review:
  2. 0:34:44 This podcast is brought to you by Coolermaster, and the CM Storm Pulse-R Gaming Headset
  3. News items of interest:
    1. 0:57:00 Busy week to be a GPU-accelerated software developer
  4. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
  5. Closing/outro

Be sure to subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube channel!!

 

Intel Devil's Canyon Offers Haswell with Improved TIM, 9-series Chipsets

Subject: Processors | March 19, 2014 - 08:00 PM |
Tagged: tim, Intel, hawell, gdc 14, GDC, 9-series

An update to the existing Haswell 4th Generation Core processors will be hitting retail sometime in mid-2014 according to what Intel has just told us. This new version of the existing processors will include new CPU packaging and the oft-requested improved thermal interface material (TIM).  Overclockers have frequently claimed that the changes Intel made to the TIM was limiting performance; it seems Intel has listened to the community and will be updating some parts accordingly.

haswellplus.jpg

Recent leaks have indicated we'll see modest frequency increases in some of the K-series parts; in the 100 MHz range.  All Intel is saying today though is what you see on that slide. Overclocks should improve with the new thermal interface material but by how much isn't yet known.

These new processors, under the platform code name of Devil's Canyon, will target the upcoming 9-series chipsets.  When I asked about support for 8-series chipset users, Intel would only say that those motherboards "are not targeted" for the refreshed Haswell CPUs.  I would not be surprised though to see some motherboard manufacturers attempt to find ways to integrate board support through BIOS/UEFI changes.

Though only slight refreshes, when we combine the Haswell Devil's Canyon release with the news about the X99 + Haswell-E, it appears that 2014 is shaping up to be pretty interesting for the enthusiast community!

GDC 14: Intel Ready Mode offers low power, always connected desktops

Subject: Processors, Systems | March 19, 2014 - 08:00 PM |
Tagged: ready mode, Intel, gdc 14, GDC

Intel Ready Mode is a new technology that looks to offer some of the features of connected standby for desktop and all-in-one PCs while using new power states of the Haswell architecture to keep power consumption incredibly low.  By combining a 4th Generation Core processor from Intel, a properly implemented motherboard and platform with new Intel or OEM software, users can access the data on their system or push data to their system without "waking up" the machine.

readymode1.jpg

This feature is partially enabled by the C7 state added to the Haswell architecture with the 4th Generation Core processors but could require motherboard and platform providers to update implementations to properly support the incredibly low idle power consumption.  

To be clear, this is not a desktop implementation of Microsoft Instant Go (Connected Standby) but instead is a unique and more flexible implementation.  While MS Instant Go only works on Windows 8 and with Metro applications, Intel Ready Mode will work with Windows 7 and Windows 8 and actually keeps the machine awake and active, just at a very low power level.  This allows users to not only make sure their software is always up to date and ready when they want to use the PC but enabled access to a remote PC from a remote location - all while in this low power state.

How low?  Well Intel has a note on its slide that mentions Fujitsu launched a feature called Low Power Active Mode in 2013 that was able to hit 5 watts when leveraging the Intel guidelines. You can essentially consider this an incredibly low power "awake" state for Intel PCs.

readymode2.jpg
 

Intel offers up some suggested usage models for Ready Mode and I will be interested to see what OEMs integrate support for this technology and if DIY users will be able to take advantage of it as well. Lenovo, ASUS, Acer, ECS, HP and Fujitsu are supporting it this year.

Intel brings Iris Pro Graphics to Broadwell in LGA Sockets

Subject: Processors | March 19, 2014 - 08:00 PM |
Tagged: LGA, iris pro, Intel, gdc 14, GDC, Broadwell

We have great news for you this evening!  The demise of the LGA processor socket for Intel desktop users has been great exaggerated.  During a press session at GDC we learned that not only will Intel be offering LGA based processors for Broadwell upon its release (which we did not get more details on) but that there will be an unlocked SKU with Iris Pro graphics implemented.  

broadwell.jpg

Iris Pro, in its current version, is a high performance version of Intel's processor graphics that includes 128MB of embedded DRAM (eDRAM).  When we first heard that Iris Pro was not coming to the desktop market with an LGA1150 SKU we were confused and bitter but it seems that Intel was listening to feedback.  Broadwell will bring with it the first socketed version of Iris Pro graphics!

It's also nice to know that the rumors surrounding Intel's removal of the socket option for DIY builders was incorrect or possibly diverted due to the reaction. The enthusiast lives on!!

UPDATE: Intel has just confirmed that the upcoming socketed Broadwell CPUs will be compatible with 9-series motherboards that will be released later this spring. This should offer a nice upgrade path for users going into 2015.

Intel Confirms Haswell-E, 8-core Extreme Edition with DDR4 Memory

Subject: Processors | March 19, 2014 - 08:00 PM |
Tagged: X99, Intel, Haswell-E, gdc 14, GDC, ddr4

While talking with press at GDC in San Francisco today, Intel is pulling out all the stops to assure enthusiasts and gamers that they haven't been forgotten!  Since the initial release of the first Extreme Edition processor in 2003 (Pentium 4), Intel has moved from 1.7 million transistors to over 1.8 BILLION (Ivy Bride-E). Today Intel officially confirms that Haswell-E is coming!

haswelle.jpg

Details are light, but we know now that this latest incarnation of the Extreme Edition processor will be an 8-core design, running on a new Intel X99 chipset and will be the first to support DDR4 memory technology.  I think most of us are going to be very curious about the changes, both in pricing and performance, that the new memory technology will bring to the table for enthusiast and workstation users.

Timing is only listed as the second half of 2014, so we are going to be (impatiently) waiting along with you for more details.

Though based only on leaks that we found last week, the X99 chipset and Haswell-E will continue to have 40 lanes of PCI Express but increases the amount of SATA 6G ports from two to ten (!!) and USB 3.0 ports to six.  

Samsung 840 EVO 1TB SSD for $469, 750GB for $388

Subject: General Tech, Storage | March 18, 2014 - 06:58 PM |
Tagged: ssd, Samsung, ocz, Intel, corsair

Back in January I wrote a short editorial that asked the question: "Is now the time to buy an SSD?" At that time we were looking at a combination of price drops with a lack of upcoming hardware releases. Since that published we have seen the release of the Intel 730 Series SSDs and even the new Crucial M550.  While those are interesting drives to be sure (review pending on the M550), they aren't changing our opinions on the currently available, and incredibly cheap, solid state options.

While looking for some new hardware for the office, I found that the 1TB Samsung 840 EVO is now at an all time low $469!  That is one of the faster SSDs on the market, and one of Allyn's favorites, for $0.469/GB!!  I have included an updated table below with some of the most popular SSDs and their prices.  

Series Capacity Cost/GB Price
Samsung 840 EVO 120 GB $0.69/GB $83 - Amazon
  250 GB $0.55/GB $139 - Amazon
  500 GB $0.51/GB $259 - Amazon
  750 GB $0.51/GB $388 - Amazon
  1000 GB $0.46/GB $469 - Amazon
Samsung 840 Pro 128 GB $0.92/GB $119 - Amazon
  256 GB $0.77/GB $199 - Amazon
  512 GB $0.74/GB $413 - Amazon
Intel 530 Series 120 GB $0.91/GB $89 - Amazon
  180 GB $0.80/GB $144 - Amazon
  240 GB $0.62/GB $149 - Amazon
  480 GB $0.87/GB $419 - Amazon
Crucial M500 Series 120 GB $0.57/GB $69 - Amazon
  240 GB $0.49/GB $119 - Amazon
  480 GB $0.47/GB $229 - Amazon
  960 GB $0.45/GB $439 - Amazon

The biggest price drops were seen in the higher capacity drives including, the Samsung 840 EVO 1TB and 750GB models, the Intel 530 Series 480GB drive and even the Crucial M500 960GB and 480GB drives.  Numerically the best value is with the 960GB Crucial M500 drive at $0.45/GB but it is followed very closely by that 1TB Samsung 840 EVO.  

evo1.jpg

As of now, the Intel 730 Series of SSDs is available for sale on Amazon.com but their price per GB comparisons don't really match that of the EVO or M500.  They are great drives, just read Allyn's review to see the proof of that, but they are targeted at the very performance conscious.  The Crucial M550 is brand new, and looks interesting; expect us to dive more into that line very soon.

For me personally, grabbing a 750GB SSD is incredibly enticing and I think I'll find a handful in my cart to update our older 180GB SSD test beds.

Intel "Wellsburg" Leaks: Haswell-E's X99 Chipset

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Chipsets | March 13, 2014 - 03:35 AM |
Tagged: Intel, Haswell-E, X99

Though Ivy Bridge-E is not too distant of a memory, Haswell-E is on the horizon. The enthusiast version of Intel's architecture will come with a new motherboard chipset, the X99. (As an aside: what do you think its eventual successor will be called?) WCCFTech got their hands on details, albeit some of which have been kicking around for a few months, outlining the platform.

Intel-X99-Wellsburg-Chipset-635x426.jpg

Image Credit: WCCFTech

First and foremost, Haswell-E (and X99) will support DDR4 memory. Its main benefit is increased bandwidth and decreased voltage at the same current, thus lower wattage. The chipset will support four memory channels.

Haswell-E will continue to have 40 PCIe lanes (the user's choice between five x8 slots or two x16 slots plus a x8 slot). This is the same number of total lanes as seen on Sandy Bridge-E and Ivy Bridge-E. While LGA 2011-3 is not compatible with LGA 2011, it does share that aspect.

X99 does significantly increase the number of SATA ports, to ten SATA 6Gbps (up from two SATA 6Gbps and four SATA 3Gbps). Intel RST, RST Smart Response Technology, and Rapid Recover Technology are also present and accounted for. The chipset also supports six native USB 3.0 ports and an additional eight USB 2.0 ones.

Intel Haswell-E and X99 is expected to launch sometime in Q3 2014.

Source: WCCFTech

Video Perspective: Intel Haswell NUC D54250WYKH with 2.5-in HDD Support

Subject: Systems | March 12, 2014 - 10:36 AM |
Tagged: video, nuc, next unit of computing, Intel, d54250wykh

In September of 2013 we reviewed the updated Intel NUC device that implemented the latest Haswell architecture in the form of the Core i5-4250U processor.  In the conclusion I wrote:

The Next Unit of Computing is meant to be a showcase for different form factors and implementations that Intel's architectures can reach and I think it accomplishes this goal quite well and should be a blueprint for other system integrators and embedded clients going forward.  Enthusiasts and standard PC users will be to adopt it too without feeling like they are leaving performance on the table which is impressive for this form factor.

At CES we first learned about the new D54250WYKH model and what it added - support for a 2.5-in HDD/SSD.  While that isn't a drastic change, it does allow for more variance in configuration options including both mSATA and 2.5-in storage with only a minimal increase in size of the system.

You can find the Intel NUC D54250WYKH on Amazon.com for $411.

Check out the video below for a quick overview of the H-variant of the Intel NUC!

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