VR-Zone Has, Well, A Haswell-E First Look

Subject: General Tech | December 14, 2013 - 02:01 AM |
Tagged: Intel, Haswell-E

Here's the short version: X99 chipset, quad-channel DDR4 (2133 MHz), 6 or 8 cores with Hyper-Threading, up to 3 GHz, up to 140W TDP.

Haswell-E, the replacement for recently launched Ivy Bridge-E, will hit in Q3 2014. VR-Zone China has already got their hands on an engineering sample but has yet to do any form of benchmarking. I went enthusiast and all I got is this lousy picture.

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Image Credit: VR-Zone

Well, they also got the slide embedded above. Apart from the specifications that were highlighted above, the slide also claims that both the X and K series will be unlocked for overclockers. Especially given how resilient modern processors are, it makes sense to allow all enthusiast-branded parts to be pushed over stock settings.

Of course Haswell-E should also bring the long-awaited boost to single-threaded performance without compromising on the core count. It is expected to launch Q3 2014.

Source: VR-Zone

A Few More Haswell Refresh (2014) Details

Subject: General Tech, Processors | December 13, 2013 - 08:49 PM |
Tagged: Intel, haswell

Intel will begin to refresh their Haswell line of processors, according to VR-Zone, starting in Q2 and continue into Q3. This will be accompanied by their 9-series of motherboard chipsets. The Intel Core i7-4770 and Core i7-4771 will be replaced, not just surpassed, by the Core i7-4790. That said, the only difference is a 100MHz bump to both the base and turbo CPU frequencies.

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The K-series processors will come in Q3 and are said to be based on Haswell-E with DDR4 memory. I find this quite confusing because of previous reports that Broadwell-K would appear at roughly the same time. I am unsure what this means for Broadwell-K and I am definitely unsure why some Haswell-E components would be considered part of the Haswell refresh instead of the Haswell-E launch.

My gut instinct believes that VR-Zone is simply confused or that Microsoft and Google Translate are both terrible at understanding this article.

Source: VR-Zone

The 25W, four core Xeon E3 1230Lv3

Subject: Processors | December 9, 2013 - 06:23 PM |
Tagged: xeon e3, Intel, haswell, 1230Lv3

Server chips with low power consumption are in style an the Xeon E3-1230Lv3 certainly qualifies at a tiny 25W TDP.  It is a Haswell chip running at a peak speed of 1.8GHz which would be great for a small business or for a home server.  eTeknix compared the performance of this chip to the i7-4770K with a TDP more than three times that of the Xeon which is perhaps a little unfair to the E3 but is a familiar chip to most enthusiasts.  That said the Xeon doesn't fall too far behind in many tests and at $250 it is less expensive to slap into a Z87 motherboard and it will reduce your power bill somewhat.

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"Intel’s Xeon E3-1230Lv3 CPU has been a hotly anticipated processor for a wide variety of target audiences – home users, office users, small business users and enterprise users. Today we’ve got an opportunity to put Intel’s enterprise Xeon E3-1230Lv3 CPU to the test in a professional home user or “prosumer” type of environment, by pairing it up with SuperMicro’s server-grade C7Z87-OCE motherboard. The Intel Xeon E3-1230Lv3 is an important CPU because it offers four cores, eight threads, a 1.8GHz base frequency, a 2.8GHz Turbo frequency and 8MB of cache all for a tiny TDP of just 25W."

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Source: eTeknix

Leaked Intel Slides Show Possible 2TB SSDs in Q2 2014?

Subject: General Tech, Storage | December 5, 2013 - 10:23 PM |
Tagged: Intel, ssd

Computer storage website, Myce, got a hold of a few slides from Intel's SSD division. The semiconductor giant is expected to have (at least) nine active product lines with new SKUs apparently coexisting with certain older models. Two of the PCIe-based product lines, the P3700 series and the P3500 series, are expected to be available in capacities of up to 2TB. They will apparently be available in 2.5" form factor as well.

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Image Credit: Myce

Intel has not produced the most mindblowing components over the last 3-4 years but, to my knowledge, they have been effective at wooing the enterprise customers. 2.8 GB/s reads and 1.7 GB/s writes at 450,000 IOPS for reading (150,000 IOPS for writes) seem pretty good, though. Combined with Intel's 5-year warranty and it will probably find its way into a few servers.

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Each of the new products will be fabricated on the 20nm process (the older 910 Series and DC S3700 Series, both from 2012, will remain 25nm). Of course Intel has access to smaller processes at this point but, since these are enterprise products, it makes sense for them to use the more tried and true methods for the time being.

If you are interested in enterprise SSDs, keep an eye out in a couple of quarters. Maybe we will even see some stuff coming out of CES in a month.

Also check out Myce for the rest of the leaked slides.

Source: Myce

Intel Xeon Phi to get Serious Refresh in 2015?

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Processors | November 28, 2013 - 03:30 AM |
Tagged: Intel, Xeon Phi, gpgpu

Intel was testing the waters with their Xeon Phi co-processor. Based on the architecture designed for the original Pentium processors, it was released in six products ranging from 57 to 61 cores and 6 to 16GB of RAM. This lead to double precision performance of between 1 and 1.2 TFLOPs. It was fabricated using their 22nm tri-gate technology. All of this was under the Knights Corner initiative.

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In 2015, Intel plans to have Knights Landing ready for consumption. A modified Silvermont architecture will replace the many simple (basically 15 year-old) cores of the previous generation; up to 72 Silvermont-based cores (each with 4 threads) in fact. It will introduce the AVX-512 instruction set. AVX-512 allows applications to vectorize 8 64-bit (double-precision float or long integer) or 16 32-bit (single-precision float or standard integer) values.

In other words, packing a bunch of related problems into a single instruction.

The most interesting part? Two versions will be offered: Add-In Boards (AIBs) and a standalone CPU. It will not require a host CPU, because of its x86 heritage, if your application is entirely suited for an MIC architecture; unlike a Tesla, it is bootable with existing and common OSes. It can also be paired with standard Xeon processors if you would like a few strong threads with the 288 (72 x 4) the Xeon Phi provides.

And, while I doubt Intel would want to cut anyone else in, VR-Zone notes that this opens the door for AIB partners to make non-reference cards and manage some level of customer support. I'll believe a non-Intel branded AIB only when I see it.

Source: VR-Zone

People prefer the small chips to the big ones

Subject: General Tech | November 27, 2013 - 12:50 PM |
Tagged: amd, Intel, arm, sales

Chips are hot this year, an increase in sales volume of 27% in Q1, 24% in Q2 and similar growth is expected over the coming year.  Unfortunately for AMD and Intel most of these chips are in mobile devices, a market which neither company has leveraged successfully as of yet; PC chip sales have declined steadily over the previous quarters.  The only good news is for AMD who managed to take a slightly larger share of this shrinking market.  Both companies are going to have to become much more focussed on the ultra low voltage mobile market if they want to remain profitable, which means less development on high end desktop processors.  Grab more market stats over at The Inquirer.

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"PROCESSOR CHIP SALES will increase by almost quarter this year thanks to the growing demand for mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, analyst outfit IHS has predicted."

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Source: The Register

Intel is stacking memory on top of the new Xeons

Subject: General Tech | November 22, 2013 - 12:29 PM |
Tagged: Supercomputing Conference, Intel, SoC, Near Memory, knights landing

Intel spilled more beans about the new Near Memory architecture that will be accompanying their new Xeon release.  The memory will be stacked directly onto the CPU giving much quicker access than you would normally see from DDR3 which has to travel over the motherboard.  They have not disclosed expected speeds, which could be up to what we see in current CPU caches only in much larger sizes.  This is not quite a Xeon SoC but in the presentation The Register heard of Intel's plans to incorporate optical fabrics and switches onto the CPUs as well with size being the only limit.  Perhaps they do have a leg to stand on when they claim the return to power of homogeneous computing.

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"According to an EE Times report, Intel's Rajeeb Hazra, a VP and general manager of its data centre group, said Intel would customise high-end Xeon processors and Xeon Phi co-processors by closely integrating memory, both by adding memory dies to a processor package and, at a later date, integrating layers of memory dies into the processor along with optical fabrics and switches."

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Source: The Register

Intel claims Knight's Landing will slay HUMA and bare all CUDA's flaws

Subject: General Tech | November 20, 2013 - 12:53 PM |
Tagged: Xeon Phi, knights landing, Intel, 14nm

Intel has been talking up the Xeon Phi, first of the Knight's Landing chips which shall arrive in the not too distant future.  This new architecture is touted to bring a return of homogeneous systems architecture which will perform parallel processing on its many cores, currently 61 is the number being tossed around, at a level of performance that will exceed the GPU accelerated heterogeneous architecture being pushed by AMD and NVIDIA.  Whether this is true or not remains to be seen but many server builders may prefer the familiar CPU only architecture and as at least some of the Phi's will be available in rack mounted form and not just addin cards they may choose Intel out of habit.   You can also read about Micron's Automata Processor which The Register reports can outperform a 48-chip cluster of Intel Xeon 5650s in certain scenarios.

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"From Intel's point of view, today's hottest trend in high-performance computing – GPU acceleration – is just a phase, one that will be superseded by the advent of many-core CPUs, beginning with Chipzilla's next-generation Xeon Phi, codenamed "Knights Landing"."

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Source: The Register

... And It's Gone. SATA Express Canceled from Intel 9-Series

Subject: General Tech, Chipsets, Storage | November 12, 2013 - 04:37 PM |
Tagged: Intel, 9-series, SATA Express

Intel is preparing to launch several processors next year. For back-to-school, Haswell will return with new SKUs and a new 9-series chipset; in the holiday season, Haswell-E will arrive for high-end (high wattage) enthusiasts on the X99 chipset; and, just before 2015, Broadwell-K will be available for the mainstream 9-series desktop.

SATA Express will not be accompanying them.

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The specification, which more than triples SATA 6Gbps's "up-to 600MB/s" bandwidth rating, will not be validated for Intel 9 Series chipsets. Intel was originally rumored to be its launch partner. The host connector accepts connections from both SATA (up to two per host connector) and PCIe-based (one device, up to two lanes) hard drives. Two PCIe lanes provides 2GB/s of bandwidth.

It seems like the real benefit is to allow internal drives be connected with PCIe speeds through a ribbon-cable. Currently Intel has not given a reason to pass on the standard.

Source: VR-Zone

Linux support for Broadwell is looking good

Subject: General Tech | November 4, 2013 - 01:28 PM |
Tagged: Intel, linux, open source, Broadwell

Over the weekend 62 patches to the Linux kernel were released, enabling Broadwell GPU support well ahead of the processors scheduled release date.  Not only is this great news for open source enthusiasts who appreciate it when large companies like Intel release detailed driver code but also means that Broadwell should function well with Linux on its release date.  Phoronix also reports that more code is scheduled to arrive this week to enable other features which are unique to Broadwell, keep your eyes peeled for any specifications we can infer from the code as it becomes available

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"While Intel's Broadwell processors won't be launching until 2014 as the successor to Haswell, this weekend the initial open-source Linux GPU kernel driver was published ahead of the Linux 3.13 kernel merge window. The changes are massive and it's looking like the Broadwell graphics improvements will be astonishing and provide significant improvements over Haswell and earlier generations of Intel graphics."

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Source: Phoronix