Rumor: Microsoft Plans a New Web Browser

Subject: General Tech | January 2, 2015 - 05:39 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, internet explorer, spartan, IE11, ie12

Mary Jo Foley at ZDNet reports that Microsoft is planning to release a new web browser with Windows 10. We have talked about it in the past, and its rumored extension architecture in particular, but it was expected to become Internet Explorer 12. Even then, snippets have shown that the team was considering a name change away from IE, to some degree of seriousness. Now we are hearing that it might actually be a wholly new, standalone browser that is installed alongside IE11.

Yikes. Okay, so...

trident-fork.jpg

Stick a fork in... ... Trident...?

(Image Credit: Wikipedia)

I guess we, first, should talk about its rumored technical features. The browser is still expected to run on Trident and Chakra, the rendering engine and JavaScript interpreter for Internet Explorer, respectively. While they are not replacing it with something wholly new, Trident has allegedly been forked into two versions, which are expected to be split between the different browsers, one for the old and one for the new.

Browser rendering engines have been in flux over the last couple of years. First, Opera decided to deprecate their Presto engine and move to Webkit, along with KDE, Apple, Google, Valve, and so forth. Later, Google decided to fork Webkit into Blink, with Opera following them, to push updates with less inter-company politics. Meanwhile, Mozilla (and Samsung) started a research project, called Servo, which was developed from scratch to be a multi-threaded, efficient rendering engine. This is difficult, because Web standards were designed to be single-threaded; it may be a successful replacement, or it may just teach them a few new tricks for Gecko.

Developing a new engine from scratch is daunting but Microsoft could obviously afford it, if it is deemed a worthy project. With Trident being forked, it seems unlikely for a while though. After all, why would they fork an engine if they had something in skunkworks for years (because a standards-compliant rendering engine takes a long time to make)? Chances are that they have no plans to even start, but don't let that belittle Microsoft's possibilities with a Trident fork that is free of legacy Internet Explorer concerns.

A preview of the new browser might not make the January technical preview of Windows 10, but it is expected to be done in time for Windows 10. We will probably have access to a pre-release version before then and they might even show it off during their Windows 10 Consumer event on January 21st.

Source: ZDNet

Internet Explorer 11 Is a Good Browser

Subject: General Tech | May 6, 2014 - 04:16 AM |
Tagged: Internet Explorer 11, IE11

According to Peter Bright of Ars Technica and their source, NetMarketshare, Internet Explorer 11 is steadily increasing in popularity. The browser is, now, more popular than both IE10 and IE9, combined. To put that into perspective, IE11, alone, is just a few percent shy of their entire Firefox usage numbers.

ie11.png

Of course, these figures change wildly depending on who performs the measurement. Wikimedia, for instance, claims that only 18% of their users are browsing with IE (NetMarketshare says 58%). W3Counter also has a significantly higher volume of Safari users, almost triple, than anyone else. (Update: 5/6/2014 @ 1:18pm EDT -- That 18% figure probably does not include IE11. Actual IE figure, including IE11, is probably ~25%)

Still, Internet Explorer 11 is Microsoft doing things right. They are embracing web standards, including ones which are outside the realm of the W3C. Because of WebGL's potential impact for web apps, they have even accepted it, a Khronos Group standard, into their ecosystem. IE11 shows what Microsoft can do when they need to. They were being pushed around by Google Chrome and mobile app platforms and, in response, they made a really good browser. Hopefully its adoption weeds out old Internet Explorer versions and give us a healthy mix of truly standards-compliant browsers.

Maybe then, we can truly write just one frickin' website.

Source: Ars Technica

It's Internet Explorer Tan (Not Ten) & I Don't Understand It.

Subject: General Tech, Shows and Expos | November 7, 2013 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, IE11, AFA 2013

Marketing decisions at Microsoft can be... different. If you include internal videos, you might see Bill Gates and Steve Ballmer in a Volkswagon parody ad. They abandon a Sun workstation on the side of a road with trash. I guess electronics recycling was not a thing back then.

The large white characters over the big monster at the end, "つづく", means "[to] be continued".

Expect more of these (perhaps at Anime Festival Asia?)

Internet Explorer Tan mixes the weirdness of Microsoft with the peculiarity of Anime culture. Inori Aizawa (藍澤 祈) is the semi-personification of Internet Explorer. The character describes herself as slow, clumsy, and awkward when she was younger. She stars in a two-minute cartoon created, apparently internally, by Microsoft Singapore. They snuck in more than a few subtle references.

For a bit of humor, her first name (, given names follow family names in Japanese) is romanized to Inori (祈り) as above. That word means "prayer" (and without the suffix, "praying" apparently). Again, this was created internally by Microsoft.

And, you know what? I believe that a well maintained Internet Explorer, if Microsoft can successfully focus on devices and services, will be their grace. Trident (IE's rendering engine) caught up to the standards-compliant ones and, if they continue to push the pack forward, can sell devices on its great experience. The other browsers need Internet Explorer to keep them innovating just as much as IE needs them.

It makes me smile. That could be my brain stuck in a bootloop, but it makes me smile. Almost every frame I look at has a reference to something. Still don't really understand it though.

Source: Microsoft

Internet Explorer 11 is for Windows 7, Too!

Subject: General Tech, Mobile, Shows and Expos | June 28, 2013 - 02:05 AM |
Tagged: BUILD, BUILD 2013, internet explorer, IE11, Windows 7

Windows 8.1 will be bundled with Microsoft's latest web browser, Internet Explorer 11. The line of browsers, starting with Internet Explorer 9, are very competent offerings which approach and eclipse many competitors. Microsoft has made some errors since then, breaking standards for personal gain, but their recent efforts in supporting W3C – and even arch-nemesis Khronos – displays genuine good faith.

ie10-dev.png

HTML5 Developer Tools rivalling even Mozilla and Google

But Windows XP never surpassed Internet Explorer 8, and apart from glitch and vulnerability fixes, Windows 7 is in almost exactly the same state as the day Windows 8 shipped. Internet Explorer 10 made it to the platform, late and reluctantly, along with severely neutered back-ports of Windows 8 DirectX enhancements. The platform update was welcome, but lacks the importance of a full service pack.

More importantly, the hesitation to bring IE10 to Windows 7 suggested that it would be the last first-party web browser the platform would see.

Not true, apparently. During their Build conference, Engadget claims to have spoke with a Microsoft representative who confirmed Windows 7 will receive the latest Internet Explorer. This is good news for every user of IE and every web designer with a cool WebGL implementation but is held back by browser market share concerns.

Honestly, my main concern is with the future of Internet Explorer, 12 and beyond. I am encouraged by the recent effort by Microsoft, but with Windows RT demanding for every browser to be built atop Internet Explorer, it better keep up or we are screwed. The web browser might be our operating system in the near future, applications should not be held back by the least of all possible platforms – be it Internet Explorer, Webkit, or any other dominant browser.

Of course, I should note that Engadget was not being specific with their source, so some grain of salts would be wise until it ships.

Source: Engadget