Prolimatech Shows Off Blue Megahalems CPU Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 16, 2012 - 04:21 PM |
Tagged: prolimatech, megahalems, hsf, cpu cooler, anodized blue

Popular processor cooler manufacturer Prolimatech has offered its Megahalems cooler for a couple of years now, and it has seen several revisions. The latest modification seems to be purely aesthetic – and I can’t say I’m opposed. Despite my (irrational?) fear of large heatsinks ripping a chunk off of my motherboard, I do find them impressive. A new Megahalems was spotted by Fanless Tech that sports an anodized blue finish that is quite sleek looking.

megahalems1.jpg

We don’t have any details beyond the images, but it is reportedly a Megahalems Revision B with a glossy blue finish. The Megahalems Rev. B is of course the company’s answer to Intel’s socket 1156 processors (though it is also compatible with socket(s) 775, 1156, 1366, and 2011). It weighs 790 grams – approximately 1.74 pounds – and measures 158.7mm tall and 74mm wide. It can further support a 120mm fan for active cooling, and it sports six heatpipes. Needless to say, it is rather large and packs quite a bit of air cooling potential. (We reviewed the original Megahalems awhile back, and came away impressed).

megahalems3.jpg

I can only speak for myself here, but this is one giant air cooler that I wouldn’t mind risking my motherboard for (what can I say, they used my favorite color ;) ). What do you think of the Prolimatech prototype? Check out more photos over at FanlessTech.

Source: Fanless Tech

Origin PC Now Offering Frostbyte 360 All In One Liquid Cooling System

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 6, 2012 - 02:49 PM |
Tagged: water cooling, triple radiator, origin pc, liquid cooling, hsf, cpu block

Origin PC has started offering a unique water cooling solution called the Frostbyte 360. The self contained water loop includes a CPU water black, pump, tubing, and a triple 120mm radiator. The company claims that the new cooler has allowed their overclocking teams to reach overclocked processor speeds of 5.2 GHz on their systems. Kevin Wasielewski, the Origin PC CEO and co-founder has stated that the Frostbyte 360 is "a maintenance free liquid cooling solution, Origin PC customers can enjoy top-end CPU performance at a fraction of the cost."

OriginPC_Frostbyte360.jpg

Although his claims that "traditional" watercooling systems for extreme overclocking required hundreds in not thousands of dollars of components is a bit extreme, it is a hobby that can get expensive.

Especially if you are only interested in cooling a CPU, the various "all in one" solutions like the Corsair Hydro series and the Antec Kuhler series can be a viable option. What is interesting about the Origin offering; however, is the inclusion of a triple 120mm radiator in the loop, which is more than the competition and should be plenty of radiator space to keep your processor nice and chilly even when overclocked.

According to Origin, features of the new Frostbyte 360 water cooling system include:

  • Micro-channel copper CPU block
  • 360mm (3x120mm) high efficiency copper radiator
  • Embedded temperature sensor measures copper surface temperature accurate to within 1°C
  • Factory sealed, maintenance free operation
  • Silent pump
  • Lightweight
  • Thermal resistance as low as 0.085 C/W
  • 1 to 3 year warranty on PCs that include the new cooler.

Currently, the new Frostbyte 360 sealed loop water cooler is available in Origin PC's Genesis series computers, which start at $1,599 USD and can be added to the computer in the configurator.  UPDATE: The Frostbyte 360 is not sold as a standalone product; however, current and previous Origin PC customers can purchase it as an upgrade.  It will be interesting to see if the the company will take on the Corsair and others more directly by selling the Frostbyte 360 cooler itself to customers.  Although not expandable like a traditional water cooler, it is also less costly and should not require any maintenance for at least a few years.  Would you be interested in using one of these 360 rad sealed loop coolers in your builds?

Source: Origin PC

Corsair Launches New H40 and H70 CORE Sealed Loop Water Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 6, 2011 - 04:39 PM |
Tagged: water cooler, liquid cooling, hsf, h70, h40, corsair, cooling

 

Corsair has released two new sealed loop water coolers dubbed the Corsair H40 and H70 Core that are aimed at budget builds and enthusiasts who prefer to provide their own fans. These new models, like their predecessors, are compatible with both AMD and Intel sockets and will have mounting hardware, the cooler itself, and a illustrated quick start guide that the company claims will be helpful during setup. As the coolers use a somewhat odd mounting ring system, photo illustrations can indeed be helpful (as I learned when setting up my own H70).

 

h40_1.png

The new budget H40 water cooler

The H40 is Corsair’s new budget sealed loop water cooler, replacing the H50 as the company’s entry level cooler. It features an aluminum radiator able to accommodate up to two 120mm fans (one 2000rpm 120mm fan is included). The radiator connects to the water block via flexible black tubing, and the cold plate is also composed of aluminum (versus the H70’s copper base plate). It includes mounting hardware to support all the latest AMD and Intel sockets up to AMD’s FM1 and Intel’s socket 1155.

The H70 Core (or CORE if you prefer Corsair’s all caps nomenclature) is a retooled H70 water cooling product that eschews the fans in favor of a slightly cheaper retail price. Further, by selling the H70 without fans, enthusiasts are able to purchase (or reuse) their own fans. The H70 CORE water cooler itself is the same as the previous 70, and features a 38mm thick aluminum radiator connected by sealed flexible tubing with a copper cold plate. The radiator can accommodate two 120mm fans and the device is compatible with both Intel and AMD CPU (Processor) sockets.

The H70 without bundled fans is a sealed water cooler that many enthusiasts have been asking Corsair for for a long time, and it’s good to see the company responding to requests. The H40 may well be a decent option for a quiet, low power HTPC. The H40 carries and MSRP of $59 USD while the H70 CORE has an MSRP of $89 USD. The H70 with bundled fans retails for around $95 USD, so it will be interesting to see where the H70 CORE will fan in retail and whether it will provide a good value. Both sealed loop water coolers will be available worldwide later this month.

 

Source: Corsair

Sandy Bridge-E Processors: Cooler Sold Separately

Subject: Processors | August 15, 2011 - 10:45 AM |
Tagged: sandy bridge-e, Intel, hsf, cooling

We reported a few days ago that AMD is considering bunding a sealed loop water cooling solution with it's high end FX processors.  In an interesting development, VR-Zone today stated that Intel will not be including any cooler at all with it's Sandy Bridge-E parts.

IntelHSF.jpg

Specifically, Intel will not be bundling any processor cooler with its Core i7 Sandy Bridge-E 3820, 3930, or 3960X CPUs.  These processors are rated at a 130 watt TDP; however, VR-Zone reports that the processors may in fact be drawing as much as 180 watts at stock speeds.  This massive jump in power compared to previous models, if true, would make Intel's move to not include a cooler a good thing, as enthusiasts will almost certainly want a quality third part air cooler at least, and a proper water loop if any overclocking is involved.  Enthusiasts especially have always opted to use an aftermarket cooler instead of the included Intel one as they have been notoriously noisy and mediocre in the performance department.  While they are decent for stock speeds, overclockers have always demanded more than the Intel coolers could provide.

The situation is made all the more interested when paired against AMD's announcement; Intel has opted to not include any heatsink at all while AMD has opted to ratchet up the cooling performance with a sealed water loop.  Personally, I find the two companies' reactions- because they are almost direct opposite solutions- very intersting and telling about the company mindset.  Which solution do you like more, would you like the chip makers to ratchet up their stock cooling performance, or do you prefer the hands-off approach where they allow you to grab the cooler of your choice by not bundling anything in the processor box?  Let us know in the comments!

Image Credit: Tim Verry.  Used With Permission.

Source: VR-Zone

AMD Considers Bundling FX Processors With Sealed Loop Water Coolers (LCS)

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Processors | August 13, 2011 - 02:53 AM |
Tagged: amd, FX, octocore, water cooling, sealed loop, LCS, hsf

According to Xbit Labs, AMD is considering switching out the usual air cooler (HSF) for a sealed loop liquid cooling solution (LCS) for its high end FX Processors. Specifically, AMD wants to pair their highest end eight core processor (and possibly the next highest end eight core chip) with the sealed loop liquid cooling solution. This information, they believe, comes from a “source with knowledge of the company’s plans.”

AMDplusLCS.png

If you are not familiar with the sealed loop water coolers, PC Perspective reviewed the Corsair H70 processor cooler last year and it is a good example. Sealed loop water coolers are similar to the large DIY water cooling loops comprised of a large radiator, copper CPU block, pump, and reservoir all connected in a loop by tubing; however, they usually have smaller radiators and pumps as well as coolant that cannot be refilled (and should not have to be).  This coolant carries heat away from the processor to be dissipated through a radiator.  Corsair in particular has heavily invested in this once very niche product with it’s H series of coolers.

Traditionally, both Intel and AMD have been content in pairing their chips with mid-range but cheap air coolers that did a decent job of keeping the processors within their thermal limits at stock speeds. Enthusiasts, and especially those interested in overclocking, have generally ditched the included cooler in favor of a more powerful and/or quieter aftermarket cooler. Needless to say, including a cooler, especially with high end chips that will likely go to enthusiasts, that’s never even used only serves to add additional unnecessary cost for both consumers and the manufacturer. Thus, this move to bundle a more powerful sealed loop water cooler with its high end chips may be an attempt by AMD to futher appeal to enthusiasts and keep with their traditional image of being friendly to overclockers and hardware enthusiasts. Having and using a water cooler that is supported by the chip maker certainly doesn’t hurt, especially if it ever came down to warranty and RMA situations. On the other hand, enthusiasts can be very picky about which cooler to use in their systems; therefore, bundling a cooler that is sure to add even more extra cost to the package may not be the right move for AMD. At best, consumers are likely to see an extra $50 or so added to the sure to be pricey highest end eight core chips.

Their idea, if true, surely has merit, but is it wise? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below!

Source: Xbit Labs

The Corsair Hydro H80 Sealed Loop Water Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 21, 2011 - 08:05 PM |
Tagged: water cooling, hsf, h80, corsair, cooling

We talked about the Corsair H80 (and H100) all in one water coolers in a previous post as they were announced a few months ago; however, it seems that they are finally out in the wild and ready for review.  Neoseeker has the review ball today and has posted a concise five page review of the device. Forunately, from their testing it seems to stack up well compared to its predecessors, though the review does note that the fan noise can become rather loud.

H80

"...the H80 also includes the same easy to use mounting system as the H60. This was one of the aspects we liked the most about the H60, so we are more than pleased to see it return with this new unit. The low-profile block and 120mm radiator will allow the Corsair H80 to fit into nearly any chassis, with the only exceptions being some of the smaller HTPC cases."

You can read more about the sealed loop water cooler here.

 

And in other case and cooling news:

Cases & Cooling

Source: neoseeker

PCCooler OC3 Shows Off a Tower Air Cooler Also Ready To Add To Existing Water Cooling Loop

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 11, 2011 - 01:35 AM |
Tagged: water cooling, PCCooler OC3, hsf, cooling

PCCooler OC3, a company not widely known of outside of China due to limited worldwide distribution, had its fair showing at Computex 2011 where the company showed off a new CPU cooler.

 

The new W120 cooler at first glance appears to be another modern tower style air cooler; however, it has a feature that the other cooler lack. Namely, the W120 supports both air and water cooling. When used as an air cooler, the W120 acts as one would expect, and a 120mm fan moves air across aluminum fins that are connected via (six) heat pipes to a copper base plate that transfers heat away from the processor.

When hooked into an existing water cooling loop; however, the tower cooler acts as a water block as well as assisting in dispersing heat via the fins and 120mm fan. The company claims that when the cooler is used in this fashion, it is capable of dissipating up to 500 watts of power-- much more than any current CPU can deliver even when heavily overclocked.

It’s certainly an interesting design, and if the company’s claim hold merit, this cooler is likely to be popular among overclockers if the price is right. Unfortunately, enthusiasts in the US are not likely to see this any time soon.  You can see more pictures of the cooler; however, over at EXPreview.

Image copyright 2011 EXPreview.  Used under fair usage guidelines for purposes of commentary and reporting.

Source: EXPReview

Enermax Shows Off Seven New CPU Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 4, 2011 - 07:54 PM |
Tagged: hsf, enermax, cpu cooler, computex

Enermax, a company most well known for its computer power supplies, expanded on it’s computer case fan lineup by slapping aluminum fins and heat pipes to some of their LED fans to create a new line of CPU coolers. The company will unveil seven new heat sinks, each incorporating one of Enermax's fans.

Bit-Tech reports that both tower and down-flow (like those of Intel) cooler types are on offer, and will sport what Enermax states are the industry’s first 10mm heat pipes.

It will be interesting to see just how much these behemoths weigh, as the current air coolers are already pushing the “just how much stress can my motherboard take” meter for me. You can check out more photos of the new coolers as well as get more information over at bit-tech.

Computex 2011 Coverage brought to you by MSI Computer and Antec

Image copyright 2011 bit-tech.net.  Used under fair-usage guidelines for purposes of commentary and news reporting.

Source: bit-tech