Thermalright Releases Le Grand Macho RT CPU Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 10, 2016 - 08:32 PM |
Tagged: thermalright, quiet computing, Le Grande Macho, heatsink, cpu cooler, air cooling, air cooler

Thermalright has released a very large new CPU air cooler with an equally impressive name: Le Grande Macho RT.

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The Le Grande Macho RT features no fewer than 7 heat pipes from its massive heatsink, and is paired with a quiet 140 mm fan (model TY-147B) that ranges from just 300 RPM to 1300 RPM. While large it is still smaller than the company's well-respected SilverArrow dual-tower cooler, and depending on performance could offer a compelling alternative for low-noise air cooling.

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Specifications from Thermalright:

Heatsink:
Dimension: L150mm x W120mm x H159mm (Fin Area only)
L150mm x W125mm x H159mm (Heat sink incl.)
Weight: 900g
Heat pipes: 6mm heatpipe*7 units
Fin: T = 0.4 mm ; Gap = 3.1 mm
Fin Pcs: 35 pcs
Copper Base: C1100 Pure copper nickel plated
Motherboard to Fin: 36 + 8 = 44 mm 46 + 8=54 mm

TY-147B FAN:
Dimension: L152 mm x W140 mm x H26.5 mm
Weight: 160g
Rated Speed: 300 - 1300 RPM
Noise Level: 14 - 20dBA
Air Flow: 16.9- 73.6 CFM
Connector: 4 Pin (PWM Fan connector)
Bearing Type : FDB Bearing

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The Le Grand Macho RT is listed on Amazon.com for $79.99, which places it in the same territory as the Noctua NH-D14. We'll see how it performs relative to the market once reviews start to appear.

Source: Thermalright

AMD Expands Wraith Air Cooler Lineup With More CPUs

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Processors | April 22, 2016 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: Wraith, quiet computing, heatsink, cpu cooler, cpu, AMD Wraith, amd, air cooling

AMD has expanded the CPU lineup featuring their high-performance Wraith air cooling solution, with the quiet cooler now being offered with two more FX-series processors.

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Image credit: The Tech Report

"AMD has heard the feedback from reviewers and PC users everywhere: the near-silent, capable AMD Wraith Cooler is a resounding success. The question they keep asking is, 'When will the Wraith Cooler be available on more AMD Processors?'

We’re pleased to announce that the wait is over. The high-performance AMD FX 8350 and AMD FX 6350 processors now include a true premium thermal solution in the AMD Wraith Cooler, and each continues to deliver the most cores andthe highest clock rates in its class."

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The lineup featuring AMD's most powerful air solution now includes the following products:

  • AMD FX 8370
  • AMD FX 8350
  • AMD FX 6350
  • AMD A10-7890K

The Wraith cooler initially made its debut with the FX-8370 CPU, and was added to the new A10-7890K APU with the FM2+ refresh last month.

Source: AMD
Manufacturer: CRYORIG

Introduction and First Impressions

The CRYORIG C7 is a compact air cooler for Intel and processors, designed to fit anywhere a stock solution will. Standing just 47 mm tall, and featuring a footprint close in size to an Intel stock cooler, CRYORIG claims this ultra-compact design will still outperform the stock solution.

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An attractive design, the C7 is further sweetened by a $29.99 retail, which places it in a favorable position in the compact CPU cooler market. Designs like these are rarely useful for enthusiasts, but there it certainly a need for good aftermarket options when overclocking isn't a consideration. There was a time when the stock Intel cooler was sufficient for many basic builds, and for some that may still be the case. But if you've spent a little more to get higher performance, a better heatsink can certainly help; and if you're an enthusiast, the stock cooler was never adequate anyway (even before Intel stopped shipping it in K series CPUs).

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In this review we'll find out if this small cooler can deliver on its performance promise, and see just how much noise it might make in the process.

Continue reading our review of the CRYORIG C7 Ultra-Compact CPU Cooler!!

Intel Skylake Processors Can Bend Under Pressure, Damage CPU and LGA Socket

Subject: Processors | December 5, 2015 - 04:35 AM |
Tagged: Skylake, Intel, heatsink, damage, cpu cooler, Core i7 6700K, Core i7 6600K, bend, 6th generation, 3rd party

Some Intel 6th-gen "Skylake" processors have been damaged by the heatsink mounts of 3rd-party CPU coolers according to a report that began with pcgameshardware.de and has since made its rounds throughout PC hardware media (including the sourced Ars Technica article).

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The highly-referenced pcgameshardware.de image of a bent Skylake CPU

The problem is easy enough to explain, as Skylake has a notably thinner construction compared to earlier generations of Intel CPUs, and if enough pressure is exerted against these new processors the green substrate can bend, causing damage not only to the CPU but the pins in the LGA 1151 socket as well.

The only way to prevent the possibility of a bend is avoid overtightening the heatsink, but considering most compatible coolers on the market were designed for Haswell and earlier generations of Intel CPU this leaves users to guess what pressure might be adequate without potentially bending the CPU.

Intel has commented on the issue:

"The design specifications and guidelines for the 6th Gen Intel Core processor using the LGA 1151 socket are unchanged from previous generations and are available for partners and 3rd party manufacturers. Intel can’t comment on 3rdparty designs or their adherence to the recommended design specifications. For questions about a specific cooling product we must defer to the manufacturer."

It's worth noting that while Intel states that their "guidelines for the 6th Gen Intel Core processor using the LGA 1151 socket are unchanged from previous generations", it is specifically a change in substrate thickness that has caused the concerns. The problem is not limited to any specific brands, but certainly will be more of an issue for heatsink mounts that can exert a tremendous amount of pressure.

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An LGA socket damaged from a bent Skylake CPU (credit: pcgameshardware)

From the Ars report:

"Noctua, EK Water Blocks, Scythe, Arctic, Thermaltake, and Thermalright, commenting to Games Hardware about the issue, suggested that damage from overly high mounting pressure is most likely to occur during shipping or relocation of a system. Some are recommending that the CPU cooler be removed altogether before a system is shipped."

Scythe has been the first vendor to offer a solution to the issue, releasing this statement on their support website:

"Japanese cooling expert Scythe announces a change of the mounting system for Skylake / Socket 1151 on several coolers of its portfolio. All coolers are compatible with Skylake sockets in general, but bear the possibility of damage to CPU and motherboard in some cases where the PC is exposed to strong shocks (e.g. during shipping or relocation).This problem particularly involves only coolers which will mounted with the H.P.M.S. mounting system. To prevent this, the mounting pressure has been reduced by an adjustment of the screw set. Of course, Scythe is going to ship a the new set of screws to every customer completely free of charge! To apply for the free screw set, please send your request via e-mail to support@scythe.com or use the contact form on our website."

Substrate.jpg

The thickness of Skylake (left) compared to Haswell (right) (credit: pcgameshardware)

As owner of an Intel Skylake i5-6600K, which I have been testing with an assortment of CPU coolers for upcoming reviews, I can report that my processor appears to be free of any obvious damage. I am particularly careful about pressure when attaching a heatsink, but there have been a couple (including the above mentioned Scythe HPMS mounting system) that could easily have been tightened far beyond what was needed for a proper connection.

We will continue to monitor this situation and update as more vendors offer their response to the issue.

Source: Ars Technica

Introduction and First Impressions

DEEPCOOL's Gabriel is part of their Gamer Storm series of products, and this low-profile design is rated up to 95 W to keep the latest processors cool under load. So how does it perform? We'll take a close look at the performance of this mini-ITX inspired air cooler in today's review.

gabriel.jpg

(Image credit: DEEPCOOL)

There are so many inexpensive options for air cooling on the market that it's almost overwhelming. At the top of the list in popularity are low-cost tower coolers from Cooler Master, with the ubiquitous Hyper 212 Evo at around $30, and the slightly smaller Hyper T4 at $25. But with a height of 159 mm for the 212 Evo and 152.3 mm for the T4 these coolers are not going to fit in every situation - and certainly not in a slim enclosure. There are plenty of low-profile CPU coolers on the market, one of the lowest being the Noctua NH-L9i, a $40-ish cooler which stands just 37 mm tall (with the fan!), but the tan and reddish-brown color scheme isn't for everyone, and the ultra-low profile design (which is also limited to a 92 mm fan) won't be required for many builds.

So when I began looking for a low-profile air cooler for my own use recently one of the options that cought my eye was this Gabriel, part of DEEPCOOL's Gamer Storm line.  The Gabriel had the advantage of being just $34.99 on Newegg when I picked it up, making it less expensive (and less tan and brown) than the Noctua. At 60 mm tall with its 120 mm fan installed, the Gabriel should fit in most low-profile enclosures, considering even half-height expansion cards are a bit taller at about 69 mm. The Gabriel also offers an understated look with a grey (well, mostly grey) fan. Of course appearances mean nothing unless it's well made and cools effectively, and for myself the question became, is this going to rival the experience of a Noctua (long my preferred brand) CPU cooler?

Continue reading our review of the DEEPCOOL Gamer Storm Gabriel CPU cooler!!

The CRYORIG H5 heatsink comes with some new features

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 17, 2015 - 06:34 PM |
Tagged: CRYORIG, H5 Universal, heatsink, Hive Fin

The CRYORIG H5 is referred to as Universal as it supports LGA sockets going back to 775 and all AM2/3 or FM2 AMD sockets, significantly more breadth that most coolers on the market.  At 110.9x143x168.3mm (4.4x5.6x6.6") it may not fit in every case and the 920g with the fan installed is going to need a sturdy board to support it.  [H]ard|OCP tested out the effectiveness of the Hive Fin and Jet Fin features in their review.  As it turns out the cooler is not the most effective choice but it is one of the quietest and for the price it is recommended for users that won't be heavily overclocking their CPU.

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"The CRYORIG H5 UNIVERSAL heatsink claims to have a Hive Fin Design for Extreme Performance Efficiency and is compatible with a huge number of older and modern AMD and Intel processors. Along with the Hive Fins, we get Jet Fin Acceleration and Turbulence Reduction. Let's however see just how well it cools your CPU."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Cooler Master Hyper 612 Ver. 2 Heatsink Released

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 2, 2014 - 09:25 PM |
Tagged: hyper 612, heatsink, fanless, cooler master, cooler

The Cooler Master Hyper 612 Ver. 2 CPU cooler is a member of their "Hyper Series", upper-mainstream product lineup. It looks to be one of the (if not the) biggest offerings in that category. Its extreme dimensions are 139mm (5.47") in length by 102mm (4.02") wide, with a height of 160.4mm (6.32"). It has a 120mm fan which basically takes up a whole side and slowly blows air across it. Some sites claim that it can be used fanless with some (but not every) CPU.

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Cooler Master is particularly proud of their "Continuous Direct Contact" technology. In other words, the heat pipes are flattened into a contact with the CPU's heatspreader (or die guard for people like Morry). This eliminates a reservoir of heat before the copper pipes can carry it to the aluminum fins and out into the air.

The heatsink is now available, but no pricing information yet (I cannot find it online).

Fanless, SFF or heavy weights, check out the best in quiet coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 23, 2014 - 07:45 PM |
Tagged: heatsink, air cooling, water cooling, quiet

Silent PC Review has just done a major update to their lists of the best Big, Small and Fanless coolers, both air and water.  The Big list requires a fair sized case in which to contain the cooler and consists of those coolers which operate at 20 dBA or less from 1m away with no more than 45°C rise over ambient.  The graph starts with the loudest 20dBA and grows more quiet with the measured temperature appearing at the noise level they tested, those with multiple values have adjustable speeds.  The Small list has the same setup but consists of coolers that should fit in most SFF cases and the fanless lacks noise ratings for obvious reasons.  Check them all out here.

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"Recommended Heatsinks lists SPCR-reviewed top cooling devices for CPUs, VGA and other hot computer parts, ordered by cooling performance and low noise. Major update on 16 Sept 2014."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

bequiet! lives up to their name with the Dark Rock Pro 3

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 12, 2014 - 08:50 PM |
Tagged: heatsink, Dark Rock Pro 3, bequiet!

At 150x137x163mm (6x5.4x6.4") in size and 1197g the Dark Rock Pro 3 is a hefty chunk of copper and aluminium.  The extra size does allow for the use of a 135mm fan on the interior with the more common 120m variety on the side which helps make this cooler very quiet even at full load.  The performance was decent but a bit of a let down considering [H]ard|OCP saw better performance from its predecessor, the Dark Rock Pro 2.  Still, if it is quiet performance you need then this is certainly a cooler worth consideration.

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"There is no doubt that when it comes to CPU air cooling, marketing terms like "category leader" and "virtually inaudible" will get your attention. be quiet!'s Dark Rock Pro 3 air cooler touts cooling up to 250 watts, which is stout at best in the world of air cooling. Does the Darck Rock Pro 3 perform and bring with it a cooling value."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Noctua puts their new NH-U12S on a diet

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 25, 2013 - 06:37 PM |
Tagged: noctua, NH-U12S, heatsink

Noctua have attempted to strike a balance between performance and profile with the NH-U12S, slimming it down to allow for tall heatspreaders to be used on RAM but without shaving off too much performance.  From the tests performed at [H]ard|OCP it seems that Noctua did exactly what they claimed, there is plenty of space to fill all your DIMM slots with any brand of RAM and the performance at stock speeds was better than average.  It is a little more expensive than some alternatives and is not the best at cooling an overclocked CPU but but of you want a slim profile and reasonably quiet performance this is a good choice.

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"The Noctua NH-U12S is well known in enthusiast circles for a few reasons. Noctua states it is because, "the NH-U12S is a complete premium quality solution that combines outstanding performance, quiet operation and excellent compatibility." And quite frankly Noctua would be very correct. Where does the value stand today?"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: [H]ard|OCP