Author:
Manufacturer: Thermaltake

Introduction, Features, Technical Specifications

Introduction

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Courtesy of Thermaltake

Performance CPU coolers have been saturating the market in bunches this year, and Thermaltake added the FrioOCK to the fray to compete against other high-end heatsinks geared toward overclockers and power PC users. We wasted no time installing the FrioOCK in our LGA 1155 teset bench to see how it stacks up against other extreme air-cooled CPU coolers!

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Courtesy of Thermaltake

The FrioOCK is a universal CPU cooler that supports a variety of socket types from Intel (LGA1366, LGA1155, LGA1156, and LGA775) and AMD (AM3, AM2+, AM2). This heatsink uses a dual-tower design with six copper heatpipes to dissipate heat from the processor. The unit also sports two 130mm fans in a push-pull configuration to wisk heat away from the CPU.

Read the entire review of the Thermaltake FrioOCK Universal CPU Cooler!

The Havik 140, a kilo of cooling from NZXT

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 20, 2011 - 08:58 AM |
Tagged: nzxt, havik 140, heatsink

The new NZXT Havik weighs in at 1035g, so it is proper that NZXT spent time designing brackets to spread the weight on both AMD and Intel systems, though you are still going to want to be careful with it.  NZXT opted to skip heatpipes directly in contact with the CPUs heatspreader and instead went with a copper base plate to distribute the heat to the pipes more evenly.  That decision seems validated by FrostyTech's testing which placed this cooler above the middle of the pack but not at the top of the cooling charts.  One design choice they are not so impressed with is the rubber fan mounts, while it does keep the noise down they are worried that as the rubber ages it may let the fans start to slip.

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"In this review Frostytech is testing out the NZXT Havik 140 heatsink, a tower style CPU cooler designed for Intel socket 1366/1156/1155/775 and AMD socket AM2/AM3/AM3+/FM1 processors. The Havik 140 cooler performs pretty well as you'll shortly see. Before we get to the massive Frostytech thermal performance charts, let's take a look at some of the notable tweaks this heatsink employs to the standard tower cooler format."

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Source: Frosty Tech

Coolers of the Gods; Loki, Gaia and Aegir

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 6, 2011 - 11:46 AM |
Tagged: heatsink, xigmatek, cooler

Loki, Gaia and Aegir are all from Nordic mythology but are also now found in PC Cases as well as in Valhalla.  Loki and Gaia can be had for around $30 while the Aegir comes at twice the price and the sizes range as well from the diminutive 330g Loki to the 670g Aegir but all are 159mm tall or less.  Legit Reveiws proclaimed that they are all great values, each with their own traget system.

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"The Aegir is Xigmatek’s high-end offering, and it carries a high end price. Coming in at $59.99 shipped it is not the most expensive cooler we have ever tested but it performed nicely. Coming near the top of the charts throughout most of the testing the Aegir was on par with coolers that cost $20 to $30 more. The fan for the Aegir was nice as well. At 100% speed the fan is quiet. It was hard to pick out the Aegir’s fan from the Scythe case fans I use in the test system..."

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Small and quiet but still powerful, the Thermolab Trinity heatsink

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 27, 2011 - 09:51 AM |
Tagged: thermolab, heatsink

Usually when you are picking a heatsink you can only choose two of the three main attributes of cooling ability, noise produced and reasonably small size.  The Thermolab Trinity has found a way for you to avoid having to make that choice.  At 735g and 150mm x 136mm x 85mm it is certainly smaller than a lot of coolers, it's 130mm fan is reasonably quiet and the cooling ability that Legit Reviews saw in their tests is impressive.  Even better at a MRSP of $55 it is worth taking a look at.

 

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"Overall, I am happy with the Thermolab Trinity CPU HSF. The cooler is a solid performer, easy to install, and coming in at the $55 mark, it is easy on the wallet. Thermolab is still new to some enthusiasts; Trinity is their 7th cooler for the enthusiast market, but they are doing well. The Trinity was within 4 degrees of the top coolers throughout most of the testing. Looking at just the air coolers at 4GHz, the Trinity comes in 3rd place, but is less expensive than the two coolers that beat it: the Zalman CNPS9900 Max and the Prolimatech Super Mega..."

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