Thermalright Launches $99 Archon SB-E 2X HSF

Subject: General Tech | November 26, 2012 - 01:00 AM |
Tagged: thermalright, sb-e 2x, hsf, heatsink, cpu cooler

Thermalright has announced a new tower CPU cooler called the Archon SB-E 2X. The new heatsink is a slim tower design, which is designed to not infringe on the RAM slots or PCI-E expansion slots. It measures 170mm x 155mm x 53mm and weighs just over 1.7 pounds (775 grams).

The heatsink itself is 53mm wide. The aluminum fins are attached to the baseplate using eight 6mm copper heatpipes. The contact plate and heatpipes are nickel plated with a mirror finish on the area that makes contact with the processor.

Thermalright Archon SB-E 2X.jpg

Thermalright is bundling the HSF with two of its silent-series TY-141 140mm fans. The fans are rated at 73.5 CFM and 21 dBA. Using PWM, the fans will spin anywhere between 900 and 1300 RPM. Including the two fans, the heatsink is 79.5mm wide. Thermalright claims that the heatsink will fit on LGA 2011 platforms without touching the RAM slots, however.

Thermalright Archon SB-E 2X_1.jpg

 

The new heatsink uses Thermalright’s VX BTKII mounting system that allows pressure to be adjusted. It supports the LGA 2011, 1366, 1155, 1156, and 775 Intel sockets and the AMD FM1, AM3+, AM2+, AM2, and 939 sockets.

Thermalright Archon SB-E 2X_2.jpg

While there is no specific release date mentioned on the Thermalright website, it should be available soon. The Archon SB-E 2X will have an MSRP of $99.95 USD. At that price, it is putting itself into closed-loop watercooling territory. It will be interesting to see how well it performs and stacks up to coolers like the H80 and Noctua DH-14.

Source: Bit-Tech

SilverStone Launches Massive Nitrogon NT01-Pro CPU HSF

Subject: General Tech | November 11, 2012 - 06:00 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, nt01-pro, nitrogon, hsf, heatsink

SilverStone recently launched a new air cooler called the Nitrogon NT01-Pro. At 140mm (W) x 97mm (H) x 120mm (D), it looks to offer up some impressive cooling potential. The cooler is aluminum with a copper base-plate and a total of six heatpipes.

nt01-pro-34view-01.jpg

Interestingly, the cooler can be used passively without fans or be paired with two 80mm fans to allow for faster processor overclocks. While 120mm fan support would have been ideal, with a bit of modding, you could have four 80mm fans in a push-pull configuration. It would sound like a jet engine, but would give you a great deal of cooling power.

nt01-pro-05.jpg

Other specifications of the air cooler include six 6mm heatpipes and a net weight of 470g without fans, which translates to just over 1 pound. One issue with the cooler is that it will likely cover up the top PCI-E slot when it is mounted vertically due to its 140mm width.

nt01-pro-dimension.jpg

The Nitrogon NT01-Pro supports both AMD and Intel processors. Specifically, it can be used on motherboards with the LGA775, 1155, 1156, 1366, and 2011 sockets on the Intel side and the AM2, AM3, FM1, and FM2 AMD sockets. It will cost €50.90 (or approximately $65 USD). More information can be found on the SilverStone website.

SilverStone_topview.jpg

What do you think of the Nitrogon NT01-Pro?

Source: SilverStone

Sandia Shows Off Prototype of Its Impeller Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 25, 2012 - 05:45 PM |
Tagged: sandia, impeller, heatsink, cooling, cooler, air bearing

A white paper by Sandia National Laboratories caught the attention of the media last year with big claims for high performance cooling. The researchers had claimed to invent a new type of heatsink based on a impeller design that was allegedly 30% more efficient at heat transfer while being smaller and quieter than traditional air coolers.

Dubbed the Sandia Cooler, the team has come up with an updated prototype that is nearly ready to come to market. Shown off in a recent video, the cooler is a small heatsink based on three relatively simple parts. A stationary disk acts as the base and area that comes into contact with the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) of a CPU. Then, a spinning array of curved fins resembling an impeller design is spun up by a small motor mounted in the center of the cooler.

sandia cooler (2).jpg

During an industry day, they reportedly signed two license option agreements with two companies to bring the product to market in the areas of solid state lighting (LEDS, et al) and computer hardware cooling, implying that it is getting closer to a final product that it was last year.

Interestingly, the cooler uses an “hydrodynamic air bearing” such that the spinning part of the cooler is spun up to 2,000+ RPM such that the top part separates from the bottom stationary part and rides (they use the analogy of a car hydroplaning) on a very thin layer of air. (Update: as KngRider noted, there is still some friction from the motor spinning the upper part of the cooler, however.) That thin layer of air is what facilitates heat transference from the stationary part to the spinning fins. It does raise questions of efficiency, however. How a layer of air is more efficient than thermal interface material, for example. Reportedly, the air bearing is not an issue that will impact cooling performance but it is a difficult concept to grasp considering TIM and metal-to-metal contact has always been touted as the best cooling situation.

Sandia explains that cool air is drawn into the center of the impeller as heated air is forced outwards through the spinning fins, which reportedly enables efficient heat transfer. In the video, they demonstrate that it is capable of being extremely quiet (nearly silent) despite spinning at an extremely fast rate – the noise in the first part of the video is due to the prototype motor that is not covered. They claim that the final design will use a brush-less motor that will be much quieter.

It’s an intriguing design because of its simplicity and form factor. It is reportedly able to cool more efficiently than some of the best air coolers on the market, which use such techniques as heatpipes that come into direct contact with the CPU IHS, larger fin arrays, and multiple fans. Compared to those coolers, the Sandia prototype is much smaller and simpler in its construction.

The company has further released a white paper (PDF) and has an area of its website dedicated to more information on the Sandia cooler. While I cannot vet the fluid dynamics they detail, it certainly looks good on paper. I’m excited to see this come to market and whether or not it will live up to its promise of more efficient (and quiet!) cooling. It could be an important asset in cooling computer hardware in everything from desktops to server rooms. Also, it might just be the advancement that air coolers have been looking for as far as the next jump in performance – more than simply adding additional heatpipes or fins (and dealing with weight, size, and diminishing returns as a result) can do alone.

I’ll say that I’m skeptically optimistic on this one, but I do hope that it’s the real deal. What do you think of the impeller cooler? Does it appear promising?

Source: Sandia

Another look at CoolerMaster's return to the Vapour Chamber

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 21, 2012 - 02:20 PM |
Tagged: coolermaster, TPC-812, heatsink, heatpipes

Heatpipes have been in vogue for a while now, but once long ago it was vapour chambers which made for the best heatsinks, a fact which CoolerMaster has not forgotten.  Their new TPC-812 shows one of the reasons that heatpipes took over, as the vapour chamber never starts to show promise until the second fan was added.  The extra surface area from the combination of vapour chamber and heatpipes benefits from the increased airflow but at the cost of additional noise, whereas many heatpipe only coolers will not show the same level of improvement.  On the other hand they provide better cooling with only one fan making them the choice of people with sensitive ears.  X-bit Labs were not terribly impressed and suggest that maybe the vapour chamber should stay forgotten.

x-b_07_cm812_pt_big.jpg

"CPU coolers have finally sported something new in their design. Although, I think, it would be more correct to say that it is more of a well forgotten old, rather than something completely new. Maybe it was a mistake to give up the vapor chamber technology a while back? Let’s find out with the help of the new Cooler Master cooler."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: X-Bit Labs

The Ice Wind Pro is a breeze to install

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 24, 2012 - 01:57 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool, Ice Wind Pro, heatsink

One neglected feature of heatsinks has always been the ease of installation, which has become much worse now that many heatsinks are so heavy they require a backplate to prevent its weight from damaging your socket or motherboard.  For those who would prefer a heatsink that can be installed without needed to access the back of the motherboard, or even removing the board from its case, DeepCool's Ice Wind Pro might be a good choice.  At 650g it is light compared to many other models and the handy bracket offers more than enough support for that weight.  Of course there are some downsides to such a light cooler, check out how well it could cool a CPU over at Overclockers Club.

OCC_deepcool.jpg

"The thing that impressed me the most about this cooler, believe it or not, was its installation process. The 100% tool-free, in-case, no-rear-access-required installation went through like a breeze. It took only minutes to go from having no cooler to having this one installed. It's the first of its kind that is done this way and I hope other manufacturers take a step for lighter-end coolers that can get away without a heavy-duty mounting mechanism. The cooler's build quality is top notch, which follows in the steps of previous DEEPCOOL heat sinks that I have had the opportunity to review."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Coolermaster's new vapourware, the TPC-812 heatsink

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 16, 2012 - 05:29 PM |
Tagged: coolermaster, TPC-812, heatsink, heatpipes

Coolermaster's new TPC-812 goes beyond the heatpipes which we have all become familiar with and adds in vapour chambers as well.  The vapour chamber works similarly to a heatpipe but instead of heat only being able to travel away in one direction, the chamber allows heat to be dissipated in to directions.  Unfortunately in order to properly work it needs to remain quite small in size so while it can quickly spread out heat it needs help from something else to keep that heat moving away.  The cooler was fairly noisy when FrostyTech ran the fan at full speed but also offered among the most effective cooling performance and when they dialed the fan back its performance ended up in the middle of the pack but for someone using a moderately powerful CPU and wanting less noise it should move enough heat to remain effective.

FT_CMTPC812_pspc.jpg

"Vapour chambers and heatpipes work on the same principle, the difference is that vapour chambers are planar thermal devices that conduct heat in two dimensions. The two 19x3mm vapour chambers on the Coolermaster TPC-812 heatsink are double-stacked (one vapour chamber on top of three heatpipes), much like the Xigmatek Aegir. Since vapour chambers are planar devices this represents a more efficient application that piling tubular heatpipes on top of tubular heatpipes. Coolermaster's TPC-812 is the first CPU heatsink to pass our test bench employing both vapour chambers and heatpipes in one package."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Frosty Tech

Gamer Storm's new heatsink wants to Assassin-ate your heat problems

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 4, 2012 - 12:59 PM |
Tagged: Gamer Storm, Assassin, heatsink, heatpipes

Following in the current trend of trying to give your newest heatsink a bizarre name comes the Gamer Storm Assassin, a 5.7" x 6.1" x 6.3" (144 x 154 x 160 mm) dual tower heatsink.  The cooler comes with a pair of mismatched fans, a 120mm fan for use on one of the sides of the tower and a 140mm for use in between the towers.  That does not seem to have hurt performance at all, Hardware Secrets tests show it to not only be an effective cooler but also one that does not generate excessive noise.  It will fit both AMD and Intel sockets, so whichever you are using you might want to ignore the name and consider this cooler for your system.

HS_assass.jpg

"The Assassin is the first CPU cooler from Gamer Storm, a brand of cooling products from Logisys/Deepcool, aimed at gamers. This huge cooler has two twin tower heatsinks, eight heatpipes, one 120 mm fan and one 140 mm fan. We already reviewed the Dracula VGA cooler from this brand."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Need a low cost cooler for your low cost Llano?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | March 12, 2012 - 04:19 PM |
Tagged: low profile, low noise, heatsink, arctic cooling alpine 64 plus

If you spent around $100 on your CPU you are unlikely to want to spend a large percentage of that again on a high powered third party heatsink but that doesn't mean you have to stick with the cooler in the retail package.  Arctic Cooling's Alpine 64 Plus stands 69mm x 99mm x 116mm making it perfect for smaller systems and weighs in at only 430g as well.  The price is something you will love, the MSRP is $15 which should sit within anyone's budget.  FrostyTech tried it out on their testbench and as you might expect it did not top the cooling charts but did perform adequately and it was one of the quietest active coolers they've tested.

FT_ACalpine64_p.jpg

"With the release of AMD's socket FM1 Fusion A8-3850 processors late last year there's been a growing need for inexpensive yet relatively quiet CPU coolers of moderate power. The 'Llano' processor only has a 100W TDP and costs just over $120 bucks, so expensive tower heatpipe coolers can be a little bit of an overkill. Arctic Cooling's Alpine 64 Plus heatsink is one economical option to consider; it's rated for 100W and stands 70mm tall so it fits in most media PC cases with ease."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Frosty Tech
Author:
Manufacturer: Corsair

Introduction, Features, Technical Specifications

Introduction

corsairh100.jpg

Courtesy of Corsair

Corsair expanded their product line exponentially in 2011 by adding a variety of PC components like mechanical keyboards, gaming mice, performance CPU coolers, desktop and headset sound systems, solid state drives, and their trademark system memory modules. One of the truest innovations we saw from Corsair this year was their self-contained watercooling units. Corsair developed the H100 to be their flagship CPU cooler that uses a dual-radiator configuration to bring enthusiasts an efficient and responsive cooling solution.

 

h100_fanconnectors.png

Courtesy of Corsair

The Corsair H100 debuted in June 2011 and is the only self-contained watercooling unit on the market that sports a massive 240mm radiator and digital fan control buttons to adjust the CPU cooler for quiet, performance, and balanced modes. This CPU cooler retails for around $119 before shipping at most vendors, but many enthusiasts wonder how it stacks up against other comparable options from Corsair, Antec, and Thermaltake. Personally, I would also like to see what performance differences I will see using the H100 against a few of the top air-cooled heatsinks I have in our office.

Continue reading our review of the Corsair Hydro Series H100 CPU Cooler!!

A CPU Cooling Heatsink With Built In Computer From AMD

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 10, 2012 - 08:43 PM |
Tagged: nano-itx, heatsink, e-350, cooling, cooler master, CES, APU

At CES today we saw what at first resembles a Cooler Master V6 CPU heastink and fan combo. The processor cooler features a red 120mm fan housed in a black shroud which is then attached to the heatsink itself. The heatsink is a tower design with six copper heatpipes attached to a copper CPU block. The heatpipes then lead into a tower of aluminum fins to dissipate heat.

IMG_7519.JPG

On the back of the unit; however, there's a little something extra in the form of a nano-itx motherboard and AMD E-350 APU based on the Brazos platform. The computer is self contained and provides a number of connectivity options. For more information on the Brazos platform and E-350 APU, see our preview and review articles. A quick run down of the E-350 specifications; however, is below.

  • Two Bobcat CPU cores at 1.6 GHz
  • A Radeon HD 6310 GPU with 80 processing cores running at 500 MHz
  • A TDP of 18 watts
  • DirectX 11 Graphics and DDR3 Memory Support

IMG_7520.JPG

The bottom of the rear of the CPU cooler is the location of the nano-ITX motherboard's rear IO panel. The motherboard features Wi-Fi, HDMI, two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, Gigabit Ethernet, VGA(?), and e-SATA(?) connections.

IMG_7522.JPG

A side view of the Cooler Master heatsink is available below.

IMG_7521.JPG

It's certainly a new idea, and it will definitely hit home for people that don't need or want to run their power hungry main desktop all the time. Because the system is self contained it does present some usability issues. Mainly that you will need to have a KVM or VNC connection to control it and the inside of the computer case is going to become a lot more crowded with cables. Further, it would be a pain to have to open up the main desktop system just to plug in a flash drive or cable. On the other hand, it'd make for a nice media or file server and would not require the desktop be on 24/7 without needing yet another box crowding my desk so I'd give it a shot. (The inside of my computer case is already a mess of wires so what do I have to lose?)

What are your thoughts on this somewhat strange CPU cooler?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!